THE HISTORY OF FRANCE.

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Seite 80 - Paris , but his wife, a courageous and beautiful woman, who is said to have had the courage of a man and the heart of a lion...
Seite 109 - ... wept ; but this paroxysm of sensibility was akin to that of devotion. Her visions came, her protector saint Michael appeared ; and, if we are to believe the testimony of the French knights, she got up and fought till the gallant Gladesdale was slain and his fort taken. The English immediately raised the siege. Joan, having accomplished so considerable a portion of her promises, would not allow the enemy to be pursued. The gratitude of Charles was proportionate to the benefits he had received....
Seite 109 - Never, by human means alone, was miracle wrought more effectually or more naturally. Joan won first upon a knight to believe, at least not to contemn, the truth of her mission ; which was to deliver France from the English, to raise the siege of Orleans, and bring Charles to be crowned at Rheims. Her credit soon extended from knights to nobles. Charles himself, in that crisis when men grasp at straws, still dreaded the ridicule of being credulous, and the danger of meddling with sorcery ; a priest...
Seite 110 - ... to retreat. The exploits of Joan were drawing to a term ; she was herself aware, and hinted, that much longer time was not allowed her. She was taken by the English as she headed a sortie from Compiegne. Her capture was considered tantamount to a victory : it was one, however, replete with dishonour to the English. They bound and used every cruelty towards the hapless maid of Orleans; raised accusations of sorcery against her, whose only crime was man's first duty, to make a religion of patriotism....
Seite 40 - ... south. During a war carried on about the same time against Thibaud, Count of Champagne, an accident occurred, which had a marked effect upon the future conduct and character of Louis the Young. He had taken by storm the castle of Vitry, and set fire to it. The flames chanced to catch the neighbouring church, into which the population had crowded, to preserve themselves from the fury of the soldiery. It appears that they had no means of escape. Thirteen hundred men, women, and children, perished...
Seite 71 - The events of the reign of Philip the Fair form but a series of acts of injustice. He was called the Faux Monnoyeur, or falsifier of coin, from his continual tampering with the standard. He frequently ordered the coin and plate of his subjects to be brought to his mint, and paid for it in new coin so much debased, that the marc of silver, from being worth only two livres fifteen sous, came to be worth eight francs eight sous of the debased coin. When the king's purpose was answered, and his engagements...
Seite 65 - The character of St. Louis is one of the noblest that occurs in modern history. He possessed all the virtues of his age, untarnished by its vices : he was brave without cruelty or violence, pious without bigotry or weakness. Although more the hero of the legend than of romance, he commands our admiration by his rare disinterestedness, his bold attempt to rule his actions as a monarch by the rigid maxims of private...
Seite 43 - ... with royalty. Philip ill repaid this kindness: he imitated his father's policy in seducing the sons of the English monarch from their allegiance; and their frequent ingratitude at length broke the heart of the sensitive and passionate monarch. Richard, Duke of Aquitaine, known as Coeur de Lion, and his father's successor on the throne, was the especial friend and ally of Philip in these quarrels; and for a long time the princes shared the same tent and the same bed. Meantime a third crusade began...
Seite 108 - ... baseness allied with our aspirations after immortality. It could not but occur to Joan, that she might be the object of these prophecies ; it was but a short and flattering step for her credulity to suppose, to believe, that she was. The idea was bright and dazzling ; — she gazed upon it ; — it became the object of her constant meditation. When we see that ill success or contradictory events can seldom dissipate illu'sion in such cases, how strongly must "her successes have confirmed hers...
Seite 267 - Tis pitiable when the valet expels his master ; as for me, my soul belongs to my Maker, and my fidelity to the king ; my body alone is in the hands of the wicked. You talk of assembling the parliament: when the majesty of the prince is violated, the magistrate is without authority.

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