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No.
PAGE No.

PAGE 152 Modesty opposed to lust, 149 152 Scorn opposed to patience,

149 163 More, (Sir Thomas,) his poem about the choice of 104 Segonia, (John de,) his story, fights his brother a wife,

105
Briant unknown,

- 117 136 Mortality, bill of, out of the country,

143 152 Sexes, the comparative perfections of them, • 149 114 Motteux's unicorn, 114 | 152 Sexes at war,

149 121 Mum, (Ned,) his letters about the silent club, 134 152 Sexea, reconciled by virtue and love,

• 149

14 Silvio, his bill of cost in courting Zelinda, - 109 100 NECKS, women's immodostly exposed, • 112 103 Snow, artificial, made before the French king, 115 109 Necks, do.

do.
122 135 Socrates's contempt of censure,

141 118 Necks, do. da

do.

132 97 Softly, (Simon,) very ill used by a widow, - 109 12 Neeks, do. do.

do.
135 111 Solomon's choice of wisdom,

195 107 Nomenclators, a set of men in Rome,

120 135 South, (Dr.,) his sermon on a good conscience, 142 107 Nomenclators, a male and female one in London, 120 71 Spies, the use Secretary Walsingham made of

them,

106 110 EDIPUS, tragedy of, its faults, 123 122 Statius, Strada's,

• 137 122 Ovid, Strada's, 136 115 Strada's excellent Prolusion,

- 129 122 Strada's excellent Prolusion,

136 101 PALACES, the French king's very fine,

113 152 Sublime in writing. Longinue's best rule for it, 149 103 Pandemonium, Milton's, to be represented in fire works, 115 108 TALL Club,

121 136 Paschal, (M.) his observations on Cromwell's death, 143 109 Teraminta angry about the tucker,

122 116 Patch, (Parson,) why so called, 130 158 Time not to be squandered,

158 153 Patience opposed to scorn, 150 117 Timoleon, his piety,

131 99 Persian soldier, his crime and punishment, 111 116 Topknot, (Dr.,) a divine so called,

130 114 Petticoats, a grievance,

129 116 Tremble, (Tom, the Quaker,) his letter about na103 Phenomena of nature, imitated by art,

115
ked breasts,

130 166 Philosopher's stone, a letter about it,

168 113 Truelove, (Tom.) the character of a good hus140 Picts, the women advised to imitate them,

147
band,

127 67 Pills to purge melancholy, 106 110 Tucker laid aside by the ladies,

112 67 Pindar and Durfey compared, 105 134 Tucker, the immodesty of laying aside,

- 141 153 Pismires, the nation of them described, 150 134 Tucker, do. de. do,

148 114 Plain, (Tom,) his letter about petticoats, 198 109 Tucker, the ladies offended about it,

122 135 Plato, what he said of censure,

142 110 Poets, tragic, errors committed by them, 123 138 VARIETY, the sweets of it,

. 145 114 Popes, the Leos the best, and the Innocents the

101 Versailles described,

- 113 worst, 128 138 Verses of Eve treating the angel,

145 114 Popish prince inconsistent with Protestant subjecta, 128 138 Verses, Translation of Virgil,

146 138 Posterity, the rogard due to it, 145 161 Verses out of Cato,

163 162 Posture-master, his frolics, 114 115 Virgil's Strada,

129 153 Pride, its viciousness and opposition to honour, 150 138 Virgil's praise of Augustus,

146 06 Project for medals given to the late ministry, 108 123 Virgins, the great wickedness of deflowering them, 138 115 Prolusion of Strada, on the style of the Poets, 129 119 Prolusion do. do. do.

do.

135
71 WALSINGHAM'S Lions,

. 106 136 Proteus' death compared to him, 143 113 Wedding clothes, a letter thereupon.

127 140 Prudes, how they should paint themselves,

148 166 White, (Thomas,) his letter about the philosopher's 106 Puzzle, (Peter,) his dream,

119
stone,

- 108 165 Pythagoras, his own and his family's learning, 166 112 Wilkins, (Bishop.) his art of flying,

126 111 Wisdom, Solomon's choice of it,

195 136 QUAINT moralists, a saying of theirs, 143 152 Wisdom opposed to cunning,

149 155 Women should bave learning,

152 137 REPARTEE, a quick one in parliament,

144 12 Roarings of Button's lion, 134 111 XENOPHON'S Vision,

125 162 SCHACHABAC, the Persian, his complaisance, - 164 97 ZELINDA, her generosity to Silvio,

109

INDEX TO FREEHOLDER.

Pada

No.

PAGE No. 53 AFTERWISE, who they are,

255 36 Bacon, his legacy to foreign nations and posterity, 230 51 Alexander the Great's false notion of glory, 252 35 Biographors, Grub-street, what they are,

230 6 Allegiance to be broke by other methods besides re- 31 Biron, (Marshal de,) his execution,

222 bellion,

132

46 Birth-day of King George I. celebrated by the Free17 Ambassador, what his business is, according to Sir

holder,

245 Henry Wotton, 199 49 Black Prince, his character,

250 41 Ander (St.) British trade there,

239 8 Boadicea, her example proposed to the British 10 Arbitrary power exemplified,

189
widows,

185 12 Arbitrary power interwoven with popery, 193 30 Bouhours, his character,

218 8 Association, female,

185 51 British constitution, how far preferable to any among 11 Association, subscriptions to the ribands,

191
the Greeks and Romans,

253 1 Authors, when their arguments lose their weight, 173 39 Authors, how they are usually treated,

234 21 CAROLINE, Queen, her character when Princess 40 Authors, to what compared by Mr. Congreve, 136 of Wales, drawn by the Freeholder,

205

23 Cartel settled for the British ladies during their party % BACON, Sir Francis, his observations on peaceable

contentions,

208 times,

214

31 Catalans, remarks on the treatment of that people, 223

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PAGE 7 Cause, a bad one, the greatest sign of it,

- 183 46 Charles I. his troubles, to whom partly owing, . 245 17 Chastity, the trial of suspected, among the Jews, 200 A Cheshire prophecy, how mueh relied on by the disaffected,

- 210 30 Chevreau's character of the Germans, of Boubours,

of the Duchess of Hanover, and the late Princess
Sophia.

- 218 51 Christianity, its preference to any other system of religion,

252 43 Christina, queen of Sweden, her resignation of the crown,

242 7 Church, the ridiculous notion of its danger, - 183 32 Church,

do.
do. do.

226 37 Church, do. do. do.

- 232 29 Church, a reflection on such as engrons that name, 216 37 Church, ill consequences of the cry of its danger with regard to religion,

2322 40 Cicero, whether most admired as an author or as a consul,

- 237 53 Citizens, the danger of their turning politicians, 255 8 Clelia, a Roman spinster, her story recommended to

British virgins, 25 Conde, prince of, his raillery upon the ficklenen of the English politics,

. 211 40 Congreve's character of an author,

236 8 Coriolanus's wife proposed as a pattern to the British wives,

- 185 14 Creed of a Tory malecontent,

- 196

- 185

17 DETRACTION from merit, what it is owing to, 199 52 Disaffection, how punished in some former reigns, 254 33 Dublin University, an encomium on it,

- 227 31 Duck hunting, what M. Bayle compares to it, - 219 41 EDWARD III., his character,

- 237 41 Edward III., do.

250 25 Elizabeth, Queen, her steadiness and uniformity, 211 33 Elizabeth, Queen, her advice to the University of Oxford,

- 228 41 Elizabeth, Queen, her character in general, - 238 54 Elizabeth, Queen, do. do.

- 256 23 Eloquence, when it proves a very pernicious talent, 208 25 English, much given to change, and why,

. 210 25 do. The ill effects of it,

- 211 30 do. Their character by the French writers,

- 217 30 do. How they ape the French,

- 218 5 Englishman, his duty as such,

- 180 7 Evil not to be committed that good may come of it, 183 6 Euripides, the tragedian, his impious account of an

oath, and how resented by the Atheniens, 182 19 Examiner, some reflections on that paper,

202 8 FAN, how it may be made use of with good succoss against popery,

185 15 Fan,

do. do. do. do do. 196 23 Female conversation, its distinguishing ornaments, 208 22 Fox-hunter, his character,

- 206 1 Freeholder, British, his happiness,

- 173 1 Freeholder, the design of that paper,

- 173 9 Freeholder's answer to the Pretender's declaration, 186 9 Free-thinkers in politics, who they are,

- 186 51 Free-thinking of the old philosophers,

232 30 French, their vanity-incivility of their writers to the English,

217 30 French, incivility to the Germans--what the Germans and Italians say of a Frenchman,

- 218

No.

Past 43 Great Britain, not to be governed by a popish por

ereign, 51 Greek historians, cautions to be obeerved is reading

them, 30 Gretzer's character, by Cardinal Perron, 35 Grub-street biographers described, 16 HABEAS CORPUS act, reflections on ita repet

警告费高清游 最后,朝前期错

sion, 31 Henry IV. of France, his treatment of the com

tors, 41 Henry VII. of England, his character, 49 Henry V. of England, his character, 28 High-church-men, how naturally they are devam to favour the cause of popery,

-925 28 High-church-men, compared to the blind Syrian. 15 52 do.

their bawlers a disgrace te the church of England, 27 Highlander, second-sighted, his character and på

ion, 30 Highlanders, Jacobites opinion of the 35 Historian, ecclesiastic, D. Schomberg's advice te

him, 35 Historians, modern, an account of them, 51 Historians, Greek and Roman, cautions to be ob

served in reading them, 45 Humour, its advantage under proper regulations, .28 31 JAMES II., his treatment of those concerned in

Monmouth's rebellion, 46 James I., his character, 54 James I., do. 5 Jews, ancient ones, great lovers of their country, 179 37 Impiety, present, to what owing, 32 Inn-keeper, a pleasant story of a high-church one, 226 52 Inn-keeper, a factious one executed for a saucy pon. 54 4 LADIES, British, their happiness,

17 4 Ladies, the great service they are of to their parties, 177 23 Ladies, a cartel for them during their party conten

tions, 23 Ladies, disaffected, who they are, 26 Ladies, considerations offered to them, 38 Ladies of either party, proposals for a truce between

them, 20 Land-tax, reflections upon the act for laying four shillings in the pound,

200 33 Learned fools, a fable, 33 Learned bodies, their obligation to cultivate the fa

vour of princes and great men, 55 Love of one's country defined-how much it is our duty,

178 55 Love of one's country, how natural and reasonable,

the actions procoeding from it, how received, - 179 4 Lovers, a calculation of their numbers in Britain, - 177 18 Louis d'ors, reflections on the edict for raising ther, 911 6 Loyalty, the nature of it,

- 122 40 Lugan, his Pharsalia, the character of that work,

md why it was not explained for the use of the

Dauphin, 17 Lies suited to particular climates and latitudes party lies,

. 199 7 Lying, the sign of a bad cause,

. 183 41 MADRID treaty compared with the treaty of

Utrecht, 50 Mahometanis, how it was propagated,

- 950 24 Malecontents, advice to them,

- 209 44 Masquerade on the birth of the Archduke, 34 Match out of Newgate, on account of that farce, 33 Matilda the Emprese favoured by the university of

Oxford, 17 Ministers of state, how they should bear an undeserved reproach,

200 48 Ministers, the condition of those in Great Britain, - 27 50 Mobs, the folly and mischiefs of them,

951 50 Monkeys' skirmishes in the East Indies, 29 Morality, its practice necessary to make a mation or party flourish,

- 916 10 Muley Ishmael, emperor of Morocco, his arbitrary power, and the tendency of it,

· 189 42 NETHERLANDS, advantages to our trade there obtained by his late majesty,

.241

影斯坦空E 西班則

20017

211

11 Garter, lady's, the dropping of it fatal to the French nation,

- 192 2 George L, King of Great Britain, his character, 174 46 George I., do.

do.

do. do. 215 24 George I., his influence and credit, both at home and abroad,

209 25 George I., do. do. do.

do.

do. 46 George I., the baseness of his treatment by the digaffected,

245 30 Germans, French writers' reflections on them, - 218 51 Glory, Alexander the Great's false notion of it, - 252 26 Gossip in politics, what she is in her family, 212 35 Gratian's maxim for raising a man to greatness,

229 41 Gratias, Spanish, what they are,

- 28 36 Great Britain, not to be governed by a popish sov

230

ereign,

- 246

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PAGE
27 News-writers, the hardship upon them in a time of 43 Sigismond, king of Sweden, deposed, and why,
peace,

- 213
7 Slander, the sign of a bad cause,

• 183
29 News-writers, do.

do.
do. 214 45 Socrates, why called a droll,

- M3
53 Newe-writers, their favourite sects and parties, - 255 31 Solomon, his notions of justice and clemency,
26 Nithisdale, a country gentlewoman in a riding-hood 49 Solomon, feast of the dedication of his temple, - 949
mistaken for that lord,

- 211

13 Solon, a remarkable law of his against the neutrality
of the subjects in a rebellion,

194
50 OAK BOUGHS, rue, and thyme, the censure and 39 Somers (Lord) his character,

34 correction of those who wore those badges, - 251 30 Sophia (Princesser character,

218 6 Oaths to the state, the nature of them,

- 181

41 Spanish trade, advantages to it obtained by the late 33 Oxford university, their affection to the Empress

king,

938 Matilda-Queen Elizabeth's advice to them,

.227

52 State-jealousy defined,
38 Stateswoman compared to a cotquean, -

- 233
45 PAPERS of the week, how they ought to be con- 11 Sully (D. of) a blunt speech of his to some ladies
ducted,

-944

who railed against Henry IV. of France, 191 32 Papyrius, son of a Roman senator, his story,

- 226

53 Sweetwilliam, its contention with the white rose, - 255
19 Party writers, their unchristian spirit,

.202
34 Party spirit to be excluded out of public diversions, 228 49 TEMPLE OF SOLOMON, feast of its dedication, 219
37 Party rage, how unamiable it makes the fair sex,

- 233

41 Tertuga, an account of that island and its trade, 238
52 Party distinctions censu red, -

- 254 49 Thanksgiving-day for suppressing the late rebellion
25 Parties in church and state, the source of them,
. 211 celebrated, -

. 949
30 Patin (M.) his ill-natured character of the English, 218 30 Tilenus's character by Sealiger,

- 218 5 Patriots, from whence they naturally rise,

- 179 14 Tory malecontent, his political faith and creed. 195
27 Peace, observations upon a time of,

- 213 44 Tory fox-hunter's account of the masquerade on the
28 Peace,
do. do.
do.
- 114 birth of the arch-duke,

249
6 Perjury, the guilt of it,

181 47 Tory fox-hunter, his conversion,
5 Persian ambassador in France, his ceremony every 7 Tories' victories in Scotland and Lancashire, · 183
morning,
179 8 Tory females, few beauties among the, -

. 185
40 Pharsalia of Lucan, the character of that work, 42 Trade considered with regard to our nation,

- 239
and why it was not explained for the use of the 42 Tyre, an account of that island and its trade,

- 239
dauphin,
33 Play of Sir Courtly Nice, the audience divided into 41 UTRECHT treaty compared with that of Madrid, 238

whigs and tories,
3 Preston rebel, his memoirs,

176 52 VENICE, the jealousy of that commonwealth, 2.13
7 Preston rebels and their party,
183 30 Verulam (Lord) compared with Lord Somers,

- 235
36 Pretender, annals of his reign,
231 20 Viper, Esop's fable of it,

- 213
9 The Freeholder's answer to his declaration,

- 186
8 Virgins, political advice to them,

. 185
30 Pudding, a favourite dish of the English,
- 217 27 Vision of a second-sighted Highlander, -

- 213
2 Punch, a remark upon that liquor, -

- 207

31 WALTHEOF, (Earl,) beheaded for a conspiracy 12 REBELLION, the guilt of it in general, and of the

against William the Conqueror, though he was late one in particular,

192

the first that discovered it, -
12 What would have been the consequences of its 8 Whigs, the finest women acknowledged to be of
success,

193
that party, -

185
13 Indifference in such a juncture criminal,

194 10 Whigs, the bulk of the men such in their hearts, - 189
28 Several useful maxims to be learned from the late 29 Whigs, vindicated from being republicans-advice
rebellion,

214
to them,

. 216
49 The celebration of the thanksgiving-day, for sup- 54 Whig scheme, preference of the, to the tory one, - 254
pressing it, -

- 249 53 White rose, its contention with the sweet william, - 955 31 Rebels against the late king, whether they deserved 8 Widows cannot be enemies to our constitution, - 185 his mercy or justice,

219 7 William, (King.) how injuriously he was treated by 18 Riches, the uncertainty of them in France, - 201 the Jacobites on his first arrival,

- 183 50 Riots, the folly and mischief of them,

251 31 William Rufus's saying of perjurers, robbers, SI Roman historians, cautions to be observed in read

traitors,

- 220 ing them,

252 31 William the Conqueror, his treatment of conspirators, 222 30 Ruyter (de) the governor of Sallee's saying of him, 218 45 Wit, its advantage under proper regulations,

. 213

4 Women, (British) the reasons they have to be
25 SALLUST, his notions of regal authority, 211 against popery and tyranny,

177
55 Schomberg (D.) his advice to an ecclesiastic histo- 32 Women, the artifice of malecontents to draw them
rain,

229

to their party,
27 Second-sighted Sawney, his character and vision, - 213 32 Women, they are not to be reasoned with by solid
38 Septennial bill, the advantages of it,

233
arguments,

- 225
3 Shrews, domestic, what they prove in politics, 208 17 Wotton, (Sir Henry.) his saying of ambassadors, - 199

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- 225

INDEX TO WHIG - EXAMINER.

- 268

No.
PAGE No.

PAGE 5 ADDRESS, a non-resisting one,

- 267 2 BALANCE, precarious one, a oritieism upon it, - 262 5 Address of the Quakers to King James the Se- 4 Barrier, Dutch, some thoughts upon it,

- 205 cond, 3 Alcibiades, his character,

263 2 CHARIOT of government, a criticism on that 3 Alcibiades' speech to the Athenians, - 264 phrase,

- 282 2 Anne, Queen, how celebrated by the Examiner, 261 2 Cato, the Censor, distinguished from Cato of Utica, 262 2 Anti-climax, an instance of that figure,

- 263 2 Censor of Great Britain compared with the Censor 4 Aristotle, his nomination of a successor in his school, 265 of Rome,

• 281

No.

PAGE No. 1 DISPENSARY, (Garth's,) vindicated against the 4 Nonsense, the only two writen be pee the Examiner's criticisms,

. 280

sublime in it, 5 ENGLAND compared to Trinculo's kingdom of 4 PARROT in London affronts a Besteck viceruys,

- 267

5 Passive obedience truly stated, 1 Examiner, why the title of this paper ought to be 5 Passive obedience, its consequences Executioner,

259

5 QUAKERS' address to king James IL 5 FLATTERER, to what compared by Thales, 268 2 Quack, the first appearance that a Freach esde

in the streets of Paris, 1 HANS Carvel's finger,

260

I RIDDLE upon legs, 2 JOHN, (St.) the Evangelist, distinguished from the 1 Riddle upon a leg of mutton, Baptist,

262

4 SCOTCHMAN affronted by a parrot 5 KIRKE'S Lambs, the name he gave his dra- 2 Semiramis, Queen, Scarron's character of be. goons,

268 1 Sphinx, a riddle,

1 Syrica's ladle, 1 LEGS, a riddle upon them,

- 259 4 Stanhope, (General) his success in Spain, 4 Letter to the Examiner full of nonsense,

- 264

3 TORYA8, an Athenian brewer, his contention with 5 NON-RESISTANCE truly stated,

- 267 Alcibiades, 5 Non-resistance, its consequences,

- 268

5 Tyrant, to what compared by Thales, 4 Nonsense defined,

- 264 4 Nonsense, high and low compared to small-beer, 265 I WHIG-EXAMINERS,

INDEX TO THE LOVER.

No.
PAGE | No.

PAGE
39 BREEDING, good, commended by Lord Roscom- 10 PAGE, (Mrs. Ann,) fond of china,
mon,

271 10 China-ware, a lecture upon it, and the inconve- 39 SLOVEN, described by Theophrastus, niences of women's passion for it,

269

39 THEOPHRASTUS'S characten, Budgel's trans 89 DISCONTENTED temper described by Theo

lation recommended, phrastus,

270 39 Translation, rules for it, 20 LOVER, his passion for Mn. Ann Pogo,

- 269

39 WORMWOOD, (Nilo,) eat up with love and spleen, mu

INDEX TO DIALOGUES ON MEDALS.

- 305

-981

PAGE

PAGE ACHAIA, described by a medal, 301 Claudius, a medal of his oxplained,

• N Adrian, medals struck on his progress through the em- Coin, old, licked by an antiquary to find out its age, pire,

300 Coins of the old Romans compared to Gazettes, - 30$ Africa, explained by a modal,

• 289 Coins, ancient and modern, the different workmanship Africa, its obnoxious animals described by the poets, - 289

of each,

- 310 Antioch, described on a modal and by tho poets, - - 303 Commodus, explanation of one of his medals, Arabia, represented on a medal and described by the

Concord, described on a medal, poets,

• 303 Constantine, Emperor, the sign that appeared to him in Augustus, explanation of a medal stamped to his mem

the heavens,

204 ory,

- 297 Constantine, Emperor, a coin of his explained, Augustus, another of his medals,

- 208 Cornu-copia explained,
Cornu-copia do.

220
BRASS, ancient and modern, distinguished by the taste, 305 Comu-copia do.
Britannia, description of her by a medal,

- 301 Corona radiata, on medals, why it represented the sun,

Cragge, (Mr.) Secretary, his character by Mr. Pope,
CADUCEUS, or rod of Mercury described on a medal, 291
Cæsar's, Roman, the character ascribed to them on DACI, a medal on Trajan's victory over them, 294
medals,

- 307 Domitian, Martial censured for reflecting on his memory, 25 Cap worn by the eastern nations,

- 295 Dunkirk, the motto of a medal on that town censured, - 310 Charles V., a medal on his resigning the crown to Philip 1.

- 368 EGYPT, described by a madal, its fertility, its sistrum, Chastity described on a inodal, - 283 its idolatry,

299 Chronogrammatists, German, ridiculed,

- 309 Equity described on a modal, Church, danger of it represented on a Pope's coin, • 301 | Eternity described on a medal,

- 281

- 291

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282

- 273

PAGE

PAGE FIDELITY described on a medal,

- 282 Philip II., a gold medal of his weighing 22 lbs., - 305 Fid elity do. do.

- 291 Philip II., a modal of his on Charles V. resigning the Fortune, translation of Horace's ode to her,

- 283
crown to him,

- 308 French medals, an account of them, - 300 Piety described on a medal,

. 284 Fruitfulness, emblem of it on a medal, - 202 Plane-tree, Cicero's observation on it,

305 France described by a medal,

- 300 Plenty described on a medal,
Plenty do. do.

290 GALBA, a coin of his explanation,

281 Pope, (Alexander, Esq.,) his verses on the treatises of German chronogrammatists ridiculed,

300
medals,

273 Goodwill, an emblem of it on a medal,

- 291 Pope, (Alexander, Esq.,) his character of Mr. Secretary Gordianus Pius, a medal of his explained,

282

Craggs,
Popes, their medallic history,

- 310 HAPPINESS, an emblem of it on a medal,

288 Persia, king of, a heavy gold medal of his collection, - 305 Heliogabalus, & medal of his explained,

- 281 Honour joined on a medal with victory, 281 RABBITS, the multitude of them in Spain,

- 300 Hope described on a medal, 282 Raillery avoided by the old Romans on their coins,

• 307

Roman Casar's, the character ascribed to them on INNOCENT XI. (Pope,) his coin to represent the dan

medals,

- 307 ger of the church, - 310 Romans, (old.) their habits,

- 295 Italy described by a medal, - 301 Rome described

- 301 Judea described on several old coins,

- 302 Rome, its commonwealth represented by a stranded vessel,

- 296 LABARUM, a military ensign of the Romans described,

- 294 SAGULUM, mentioned by 'Virgil, described on a Liberty, description of it on a medal,

287
medal,

300 Legend on medals examined, 307 Scales on old coins explained,

- 289 Lucius Verus, a medal of his victory over the Par- Security described on a medal,

. 283 thians, - 205 Sheep, the emblem of France,

300

Ships of the Romans, a conjecture that they had their MARCUS Aurelius, explanation of three of his coins, 206 tutelar deities,

389 Martial censured on the memory of Domitian, - 295 Ships of the Romans, & conjecture that they had their Mauritania described on a medal, - 300 tutelar deities,

296 Medalations described, - 306 Shipwrecks described,

- 289 Medals, ancient dialogues on their usefulness, - 273 Sicily described on a inedal,

- 302 Medals, Roman, illustrated by the Latin poots, - 298 Sistrum, or timbrel of the Egyptians,

- 299 Medals, a parallel between the ancient and modern ones, 305 Slaves, how they became citizens of Rome,

- 287 Medals, why the ancients made them of brass or Smyrna described on a medal and by the poets, - 303 copper - 305 Spain described on a medal,

- 300 Medals, when they passed as current coin, - 306 Spain abounds with rabbits,

- 300 Medals, their mottos or inscriptions inquired into, - 307 Sphinx, description of that monster,

297 Medals, account of French ones, - 309 Standard-bearer, Roman, described,

291 Medallic history of the popes,

- 310 Sun, why represented on medals by Corona Radiata, 208 Medals, Pope's verses on the treatise of,

- 273 Mercury's rod, or Caduceus, described on a medal, - 291 THUNDERBOLT on old medals explained,

290 Military fury shut up in the temple of Javius, - 294 Tiberius, a coin of his explained,

- 294 Timbrel of the Egyptians,

299 NEMÆAN Games, what was the reward of the victor, 302 Titus, one of his medals explained,

- 302 Trajan, a medal of his victory over Daci,

294 OAKEN garland on old medals explained, 290 Trajan, another of his medals,

- 206 Oaken garlands, when distributed as a reward, - 290 Olives, abundance of them in Spain,

- 300 VESPASIAN, a medal on the peace he procured the empire,

• 205 PALM-TREE, why represented on coin relating to Vespasian, another of his medals explained,

- 302 Judea, 284 Vessel, old Roman, described,

- 288 Parsley, a garland of it the reward of the victor in the Victory described on a medal,

- 303 Nemæan games, - 302 Victory do. do.

- 287 Parthia described on a medal and by the poets, - 303 Victory on a coin of Constantine,

- 287 Parthians, a medal on Lucius Verus's victory over them, 295 Victory joined on a medal with honour,

. 281 Peace described on a modal, 282 Virtue described on a medal,

281 Persius a better poet than Lucan,

- 304 Phænix described on a medal,

- 284 I WATER-DEITIES represented on medals, - 296

INDEX TO REMARKS ON ITALY.

PAGE - 313

PAGE ANCONIA,

- 334 DEDICATION, Antiquities and natural curiosities that lie near the city of Naples,

- 343 FANO,

Ferrara, BERNE,

377 Florence, Bologne,

371 From Naples to Rome by son, Brescia,

322 Fribourg,

- 333 330

368 • 350 - 376

CAPRIA, Lalo or,

348 | GENEVA and the lako,

373

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