The History of the United States of America, Band 5

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CHAPTER XI
97
Partiality for France
103
Hamiltons Correspondence with Monroe
113
William Cobbett Porcupines Gazette
120
State of Affairs in France
128
Talleyrands unofficial Communications
129
Dispatches to America
140
Talleyrands Reply to the Memorial
147
Observations on this Manifesto
153
Departure of Marshall and Pinckney
159
Kean and Cobbett
165
Keans Attack on Cobbett
171
Accounts from France
177
Private BillsRelief to the Daughters of De Grasse
186
Policy of Jefferson and the Opposition
193
Communication of the Dispatches
203
Presidents Replies to Addresses Fast
209
Suspected Intrigues by Aliens
215
Views taken of Gerrys Conduct
221
American Newspapers
229
Rising Spirit of Support to the Administration
235
Subordinate Army Appointments
241
Mississippi Territory
247
Maryland Election
250
Departure of Gerry Further Concessions by France
259
Honors to the President
267
Jeffersons original Draught
273
Secret History of this Speech
279
The Presidents Motives therefor
287
Activity of Jefferson
293
General Considerations on the Law of Libel
298
Capture of a French Frigate
304
Washingtons estimate of the Opposition
309
Revised Constitution of Kentucky
315
Monroe Governor of Virginia
321
Reverses of the French Republic
323
True Character of that Transaction Parallel of Adams
329
Wolcotts Account of the State of Parties
335
Petition to Congress from colored Men
341
Bankrupt Law
347
Growing Differences among the Federalists
353
Prospects of the Presidential Election
355
Massachusetts Election
362
Rushs Verdict against Cobbett
368
Inaugural Ceremonies
420
Newspaper OrganNational Intelligencer
421
Removals and Appointments
427
Squadron sent to the Mediterranean
434
Repeal of Adamss Judiciary Act
440
British Debts Revolutionary Balances
446
Wolcotts Reply Federal Newspapers
452
Political Grounds of the New England Church Establish
459
Progress and Effects of religious Enthusiasm
465
Proceedings respecting the right of Deposit
471
CHAPTER XVII
478
Cession by the Indians of Southern Illinois
482
Close of the Commission under Jays Treaty
488
Opinions as to the Acquisition of Louisiana
494
Revival of the Slave Trade by South Carolina
500
Amendment of the Constitution proposed
506
Impeachment of Addison in that State
512
Freedom of the Press in New York
518
He forces a Quarrel on Hamilton
520
His Character
526
Of Delaware and Maryland
532
Jeffersons Plan of Seaboard Defense Gunboats
538
Duane the public Printing
544
New Breach in the Republican Party
550
Gubernatorial Election
556
Relations with Tunis
562
Cabinet Project for purchasing Florida Secret Session
568
Randolphs Report
569
Views of Randolph
575
Internal Improvements Cumberland Road
581
BURRS MYSTERIOUS ENTERPRISE AFFAIRS OF KEN
594
Return to Philadelphia
600
Wilkinsons Determination
607
Proceedings at New Orleans Arrests
613
Tylers Flotilla
619
Second Session of the Ninth Congress Habeas Corpus
625
Provisions of the Act
638
Coast Survey
644
Appropriations for Indian Treaties
650
The Treaty as agreed to
657
Reasons given for that Rejection
662
Proceedings against Burr
668
The Driver Sloop of War
674
Measures taken in consequence
681

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Seite 215 - I will never send another minister to France without assurances that he will be received, respected, and honored as the representative of a great, free, powerful, and independent nation.
Seite 165 - The liberty of the press is indeed essential to the nature of a free state ; but this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter, when published. Every freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments he pleases before the public ; to forbid this is to destroy the freedom of the press ; but if he publishes what is improper, mischievous, or illegal, he must take the consequence of his own temerity.
Seite 476 - Mexican republic, conformably with what is stipulated in the preceding article, shall be incorporated into the union of the United States and be admitted at the proper time (to be judged of by the Congress of the United States...
Seite 165 - But, to punish (as the law does at present) any dangerous or offensive writings, which, when published, shall, on a fair and impartial trial, be adjudged of a pernicious tendency, is necessary for the preservation of peace and good order, of government and religion, the only solid foundations of civil liberty.
Seite 38 - Such is the amiable and interesting system of government (and such are some of the abuses to which it may be exposed) which the people of America have exhibited to the admiration and anxiety of the wise and virtuous of all nations, for eight years, under the administration of a citizen, who, by a long course of great actions, regulated by prudence, justice, temperance, and fortitude, conducting a people inspired with the same virtues, and animated with the same ardent patriotism and love of liberty,...
Seite 39 - If a preference, upon principle, of a free republican government, formed upon long and serious reflection, after a diligent and impartial inquiry after truth ; if an attachment to the Constitution of the United States, and a conscientious determination to support it, until it shall be altered by the...
Seite 65 - Such attempts ought to be repelled with a decision which shall convince France, and the world, that we are not a degraded people, humiliated under a colonial spirit of fear and sense of inferiority, fitted to be the miserable instruments of foreign influence ; and regardless of national honor, character, and interest...
Seite 274 - States are parties, as limited by the plain sense and intention of the instrument constituting that compact; as no further valid than they are authorized by the grants enumerated in that compact; and that, in case of a deliberate, palpable, and dangerous exercise of other powers not granted by the said compact, the States, who are parties thereto, have the right and are in duty bound to interpose for arresting the progress of the evil, and for maintaining within their respective limits the authorities,...
Seite 271 - That the government created by this compact was not made the exclusive or final judge of the extent of the powers delegated to itself; since that would have made its discretion, and not the Constitution, the measure of its powers; but that, as in all other cases of compact among parties having no common judge, each party has an equal right to judge for itself, as well of infractions, as of the mode and measure of redress.
Seite 494 - In the salutary operation of this sagacious and benevolent restraint it is believed that the inhabitants of Indiana will at no very distant day find ample remuneration for a temporary privation of labor and of emigration.

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