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Contract with the

1708

said sachems and chief warriors conveyed, on the 28th day of June, 1785, for the consideration of $11,500 in goods and money, " all that tract of land situate on the west side of the line commonly called the line of property, established at a treaty held at Fort Stanwix, in 1768, and on the north side of the Pennsylvania line, beginning at the mouth of the Unadilla or Tianaderha river, where the same empties into the Susquehanna river; thence, up the said Unadilla or Tianaderha river, ten miles, measured on a straight line ; thence, due west, to the Chenango river; thence, southerly, down the said Chenango river, to where it empties into the said Susquehanna river, and to the said line called the line of property; thence, along the said line, to the place of beginning, so as to comprehend all the land belonging to the Oneida and Tuscarora nations, lying south of the said line to be run from the said Unadilla or Tianaderha river, to the Chenango river, and north of the division line between the State of New York and the State of Pennsylyania, together with all ways, waters, watercourses, rivers, rivulets, creeks, and streams of water, and also all mines and minerals which are or may be found thereon," &c.

2. A contract executed by the tribe or nation of Indians Onondagas, at a treaty held at Fort called the Onondagas, at a treaty held at Fort Schuyler, (for1211. 1 September, merly called Fort Stanwix,) with George Clinton, and Wil

liam Floyd, Ezra L'Hommedieu, Richard Varick, Samuel Jones, Egbert Benson, and Peter Gansevoort, junior, commissioners on behalf of the people of the State of New York, whereby the aforesaid Onondagas stipulated, on the 12th day of September, 1788, as follows : “ First. The Onondagas do cede and grant all their lands to the people of the State of New York, forever. Secondly. The Onondagas shall, of the said ceded lands, hold to themselves and their posterity, forever, for their own use and cultivation, but not to be sold, leased, or in any other manner aliened or disposed of to others, all that tract of land beginning at the southerly end of the Salt lake, at the place where the river or stream on which the Onondagas now have their village empties into the said lake, and runs from the said place of beginning, east, three miles; thence, southerly, according to the general course of the said river, until it shall intersect a line running east and west at the distance of three miles south from the said village ; thence, from the said point of intersection, west, nine miles; thence, northerly, parallel to the second course above mentioned, until an east line will strike the place of beginning; and thence, east, to the said place of beginning:

Thirdly. The Onondagas and their posterity, forever, shall enjoy the free right of hunting in every part of the said ceded lands, and of fishing in all the waters within the same. Fourthly. The Salt lake, and the lands for one mile round the same, shall forever remain for the common benefit of the people of the State of New York, and of the Onondagas and their posterity, for the purpose of making salt, and shall not

be granted or in any wise disposed of for other purposes. Fifthly. In consideration of the said cession and grant, the people of the State of New York do, at this treaty, pay to the Onondagas one thousand French crowns in money, and two hundred pounds in clothing, at the price which the same cost the people of the State of New York. And the people of the State of New York shall annually pay to the Onondagas and their posterity, forever, on the first day of June, iu every year, at Fort Schuyler, five hundred dollars in silver ; but if the Onondagas or their posterity shall, at any time hereafter, elect that the whole or any part of the said five hundred dollars shall be paid in clothing or provisions, and give six weeks' previous notice thereof to the Governor of the said State for the time being, then so much of the annual payment shall, for that time, be in clothing or provisions, as the Onondagas or their posterity shall elect, and at the price which the same shall cost the people of the State of New York, at Fort Schuyler aforesaid. Sixthly. The people of the State of New York may, in such manner as they shall deem proper, prevent any persons except the Onondagas from residing or settling on the lands so to be held by the Onondagas and their posterity, for their own use and cultivation ; and if any persons shall, without the consent of the people of the State of New York, come to reside or settle on the said lands, or on any other of the lands so ceded as aforesaid, the Onondagas and their posterity shall forth with give notice of such intrusions to the Governor of the said State for the time being; and, further, the Onondagas and their posterity, forever, shall, at the request of the Governor of the said State, be aiding to the people of the State of New York in removing all such intruders, and in apprehending, not only such intruders, but also felons and other offenders who may happen to be on the said ceded lands, to the end that such intruders, felons, and other offenders, may be brought to justice.”

3. A contract executed at a treaty held at Fort Schuyler, Comidas, with elde (formerly Fort Stanwix,) by the Oneida tribe or nation of ly held at Fort Indians, on the 22d of September, 1788, with George Clin. 22d of September, ton, William Floyd, Ezra L'Hommedieu, Richard Varick, Samuel Jones, Egbert Benson, and Peter Gansevoort, junior, commissioners on behalf of the State of New York, by which the Oneidas entered into the following stipulations : “ First. The Oneidas do cede and grant all their lands to the people of the State of New York, forever. Secondly. Of the said ceded lands, the following tract, to wit: beginning at the Wood creek, opposite to the mouth of the Canada creek, and where the line of property comes to the said Wood creek, and runs thence, southerly, to the northwest corner of the tract to be granted to John Francis Perache ; thence, along the westerly bounds of the said tract, to the southwest corner thereof; thence, to the northwest corner of the tract granted to James Dean; thence, along the westerly bounds thereof,

1788

1788

Contract with the to the southwest corner of the last-mentioned tract; thence, ly held at Fort due south, until it intersects a due west line from the head med Splember, of the Tianaderha or Unadilla river; thence, from the said

point of intersection, due west, until the Deep spring bears due north; thence, due north, to the Deep spring; thence, the nearest course, to the Canaseraga creek; and thence, along the said creek, the Oneida lake, and the Wood creck, to the place of beginning, shall be reserved for the following several uses, that is to say : the lands lying to the northward of a line parallel to the southern line of the said reserved lands, and four miles distant from the said southern line, the Oneidas shall hold to themselves and their posterity, forever, for their own use and cultivation, but not to be sold, leased, or in any other manner aliened or disposed of to others. The Oneidas may, from time to time, forever, make leases of the lands between the said parallel lines (being the residue of the said reserved lands) to such persons, and on such rents reserved, as they shall deem proper ; but no lease shall be for a longer term than twenty-one years from the making thereof; and no new lease shall be made until the former lease of the same lands shall have expired. The rents shall be to the use of the Oneidas and their posterity, forever. And the people of the State of New York shall, from time to time, make provision by law to compel the lessees to pay the rents, and in every other respect to enable the Oneidas and their posterity to have the full benefit of their right so to make leases and to prevent frauds on them respecting the same. And the Oneidas and their posterity, forever, shall enjoy the free right of hunting in every part of the said ceded lands, and of fishing in all the waters within the same ; and, especially, there shall forever remain, ungranted by the people of the State of New York, one half mile square, at the distance of every six miles of the lands along the northern bounds of the Oneida lake ; one half mile in breadth of the lands on each side of the Fish creek, and a convenient piece of land at the fishing-place in the Onondaga river, about three miles from where it issues out of the Oneida lake, and to remain as well for the Oneidas and their posterity as for the inhabitants of the said State to land and encamp on. But, notwithstanding any reservation to the Oneidas, the people of the State of New York may erect public works and edi. fices as they shall think proper, at such place and places, at or near the confluence of the Wood creek and the Oneida lake, as they shall elect, and may take and appropriate for such works or buildings, lands to the extent of one square mile at each place: and, further, not withstanding any reservations of lands to the Oneidas, for their own use, the New England Indians (now settled at Brotherton, under the pastoral care of the reverend Samson Occum) and their posterity, forever, and the Stockbridge Indians and their posterity, forever, are to enjoy their settlements on the lands hereto. fore given to them by the Oneidas for that purpose, that is

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to say : a tract of two miles in breadth and three miles in Contract with the
length for the New England Indians, and a tract of six miles ty held at Fort
square for the Stockbridge Indians. Thirdly. In considera- 22 September,
tion of the said cession and grant, the people of the State of 1758.
New York do, at this treaty, pay to the Oneidas two thou-
sand dollars in money, two thousand dollars in clothing and
other goods, and one thousand dollars in provisions; and, also,
five hundred dollars in money, to be applied towards build-
ing a grist-mill and saw-mill, at their village. And the peo-
ple of the State of New York shall annually pay to the Onei.
das and their posterity, forever, on the first day of June, in
every year, at Fort Schuyler, six hundred dollars in silver ;
but if the Oneidas or their posterity shall, at any time here-
after, elect that the whole or any part of the said six hun-
dred dollars shall be paid in clothing or provisions, and give
six weeks' previous notice thereof to the Governor of the
said State for the time being, then so much of the annual
payment shall, sor that time, be in clothing or provisions, as
the Oneidas and their posterity shall elect, and at the price
which the same shall cost the people of the State of New
York at Fort Schuyler. And as a further consideration to
the Oneidas, the people of the State of New York shall grant
to the said John Francis Perache a tract of land, beginning
in the line of property, at a certain cedar tree, near the road
leading to Oneida, and runs from the said cedar tree, southerly,
along the line of property, two miles; then, westerly, at right
angles to the said line of property, two miles; then, north-
erly, at right angles to the last course, two miles, and then
to the place of beginning ; which the said John Francis Pe.
rache hath consented to accept from the Oneidas, in satis-
faction for an injury done to him by one of their nation. And,
further, the lands intended by the Oneidas for John T. Kirk-
land and for George W. Kirkland, being now appropriated
to the use of the Oneidas, the people of the State of New
York shall, therefore, by a grant of other lands, make com-
pensation to the said John T. Kirkland and George W. Kirk-
land. And, further, that the people of the State of New
York shall, as a benevolence from the Oneidas to Peter Pe-
net, and in return for services rendered by him to their na-
tion, grant to the said Peter Penet, of the said ceded lands
lying to the northward of the Oneida lake, a tract of ten
miles
square,

wherever he shall elect the same. Fourthly.
The people of the State of New York may, in such manner
as they shall deem proper, prevent any persons except the
Oneidas from residing or settling on the lands so to be held
by the Oneidas and their posterity, for their own use and
cultivation. And if any persons shall, without the consent
of the people of the State of New York, come to reside or
settle on the said lands, or on any other of the lands so ceded
as aforesaid, except the lands whereof the Oneidas may make
leases as aforesaid, the Oneidas and their posterity shall
forthwith give notice of such intrusions to the Governor of

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Contract with the

ruary, 1789.

the said State for the time being. And, further, the Oneidas and their posterity, forever, shall, at the request of the Governor of the said State, be aiding to the people of the State of New York in removing all such intruders, and in apprehending, not only such intruders, but also lelons, and other offenders, who may happen to be on the said ceded lands, to the end that such intruders, felons, and other offenders, may be brought to justice. Before the execution hereof, the Oneidas, in public council, declared to the commissioners that they had, in return for his frequent good offices to them, given to John J. Bleecker, of the lands reserved for their own use, one mile square, adjoining to the lands of James Dean, and requested that the same might be granted and confirmed to him by the State.”

4. A contract executed by the sachems, chiefs, and warCargada urmea: riors, of the tribe or nation of Indians called the Cayugas, on the 25th of Feb' at a treaty held in the city of Albany, with George Clinton,

Pierre Van Courtlandt, Ezra L'Hommedieu, Abraham Ten Broeck, John Hathorn, Samuel Jones, Peter Gansevoort, junior, and Egbert Benson, commissioners on behalf of the State of New York, by which the said sachems, chiefs, and warriors, of the Cayugas, covenanted, on the 25th of February, 1789, as follows: “ First. The Cayugas do cede and grant all their lands to the people of the State of New York, forever. Secondly. The Cayugas shall, of the said ceded lands, hold to themselves and to their posterity, forever, for their own use and cultivation, but not to be sold, leased, or in any other manner aliened or disposed of to others, all that traet of land, beginning at the Cayuga salt spring, on the Seneka river, and running thence, southerly, to intersect the middle of a line to be drawn from the outlet of Cayuga to the outlet of Waskongh, and from the said place of intersection, southerly, the general course of the eastern bank of the Cayuga lake ; thence, westerly, to intersect a line running on the west side of the Cayuga lake, at the mean distance of three iniles from the western bank thereof; and from the said point of intersection, along the said line, so running on the west side of the Cayuga lake, to the Seneka river; thence down the said river, to the Cayuga lake; thence, through the said lake, to the outlet thereof; thence, further down the said Seneka river, to the place of beginning, so as to comprehend within the limits aforesaid, and exclusive of the water of Cayuga lake, the quantity of one hundred square miles. Also, the place in the Seneka river, at or near a place called Skayes, where the Cayugas have heretofore taken eel; and a competent piece of land on the southern side of the river, at the said place, sufficient for the Cayugas to land and encamp on, and to cure their cel. Excepted, nevertheless, out of the said lands so reserved, one mile square at the Cayuga ferry. Thirdly. The Cayugas and their posterity, forever, shall enjoy the free right of hunting in every part of the said ceded lands, and of fishing in all the waters within

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