Geography and Revolution

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David N. Livingstone, Charles W. J. Withers
University of Chicago Press, 15.08.2010 - 440 Seiten
A term with myriad associations, revolution is commonly understood in its intellectual, historical, and sociopolitical contexts. Until now, almost no attention has been paid to revolution and questions of geography. Geography and Revolution examines the ways that place and space matter in a variety of revolutionary situations.

David N. Livingstone and Charles W. J. Withers assemble a set of essays that are themselves revolutionary in uncovering not only the geography of revolutions but the role of geography in revolutions. Here, scientific revolutions—Copernican, Newtonian, and Darwinian—ordinarily thought of as placeless, are revealed to be rooted in specific sites and spaces. Technical revolutions—the advent of print, time-keeping, and photography—emerge as inventions that transformed the world's order without homogenizing it. Political revolutions—in France, England, Germany, and the United States—are notable for their debates on the nature of political institutions and national identity.

Gathering insight from geographers, historians, and historians of science, Geography and Revolution is an invitation to take the where as seriously as the who and the when in examining the nature, shape, and location of revolutions.
 

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Inhalt

1 On Geography and Revolution
1
PART I GEOGRAPHY AND SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION
23
PART II GEOGRAPHY AND TECHNICAL REVOLUTION
133
PART III GEOGRAPHY AND POLITICAL REVOLUTION
239
Revolutions and Their Geographies
351
Contributors
363
Bibliography
367
Index
417
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Beliebte Passagen

Seite 10 - The blood of the slain, the weeping voice of nature cries, 'tis time to part.
Seite 10 - Small islands not capable of protecting themselves are the proper objects for kingdoms to take under their care; but there is something very absurd, in supposing a continent to be perpetually governed by an island. In no instance hath nature made the satellite larger than its primary planet, and as England and America, with respect to each other, reverses the common order of nature, it is evident they belong to different systems: England to Europe, America to itself.

Über den Autor (2010)

David N. Livingstone is professor of geography and intellectual history at Queen's University, Belfast. Charles W. J. Withers is professor of geography at the University of Edinburgh. They collaborated previously on Geography and Enlightenment, also published by the University of Chicago Press.

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