Rebellion and Recognition: Slavery, Sovereignty, Secession, and Recognition Considered

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Union and Emancipation Society, 1863 - 28 Seiten

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Seite 12 - I consider, then, the power to annul a law of the United States, assumed by one State, INCOMPATIBLE WITH THE EXISTENCE OF THE UNION, CONTRADICTED EXPRESSLY BY THE LETTER OF THE CONSTITUTION, UNAUTHORIZED BY ITS SPIRIT, INCONSISTENT WITH EVERY PRINCIPLE ON WHICH IT WAS FOUNDED, AND DESTRUCTIVE OF THE GREAT OBJECT FOR WHICH IT WAS FORMED.
Seite 9 - ... a jealous care of the right of election by the people, a mild and safe corrective of abuses which are lopped by the sword of...
Seite 11 - But the defects of the confederation need not be detailed. Under its operation we could scarcely be called a nation. We had neither prosperity at home nor consideration abroad. This state of things could not be endured, and our present happy Constitution was formed, but formed in vain, if this fatal doctrine prevails.
Seite 10 - ... adopted. The leading object in establishing this government, an object forced on the country by the condition of the times and the absolute necessity of the law, was to give to Congress power to lay and collect imposts without the consent of particular States. The Revolutionary debt remained unpaid ; the national treasury was bankrupt ; the country was destitute of credit ; Congress issued its requisitions on the States, and the States neglected them ; there was no power of coercion but war;...
Seite 10 - Therefore, Sir, since any State, before she can prove her right to dissolve the Union, must show her authority to undo what has been done, no State is at liberty to secede, on the ground that she and other States have done nothing but accede. She must show that she has a right to reverse what has been ordained, to unsettle and overthrow what has been established, to reject what the people have adopted, and to break up what they have ratified; because these are the terms which express the transactions...
Seite 25 - To continue to call that a Possession of Spain, in which all Spanish occupation and power had been actually extinguished and effaced, could render no practical service to the Mother Country; — but it would have risked the Peace of the World. For all Political Communities are responsible to other Political Communities for their conduct, — that is, they are bound to perform the ordinary international duties, and to. afford redress for any violation of the Rights of others by their Citizens or Subjects.
Seite 10 - Louisiana may secede, if she choose, form a foreign alliance, and hold the mouth of the Mississippi. If one State may secede, ten may do so — twenty may do so — twenty-three may do so. Sir, as these secessions go on, one after another, what is to constitute the United States? Whose will be the army?
Seite 12 - The Constitution declares that the judicial powers of the United States extend to cases arising under the laws of the United States, and that such laws, the Constitution, and treaties shall be paramount to the State constitutions .and laws.
Seite 13 - We hold these truths to be self-evident, that, whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends" (life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness), "it is the right of the people to alter or to abolish it...
Seite 12 - To say that any state may at pleasure secede from the Union, is to say that the United States are not a nation, because it would be a solecism to contend that any part of a nation might dissolve its connection with the other parts, to their injury or ruin, without committing any offence. Secession, like any other revolutionary act, may be morally justified by the extremity of oppression...

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