Dreiser: Sister Carrie; Jennie Gerhardt; Twelve Men

Cover
Library of America, 1987 - 1168 Seiten
The library of America is dedicated to publishing America's best and most significant writing in handsome, enduring volumes, featuring authoritative texts. Hailed as the "finest-looking, longest-lasting editions ever made" (The New Republic), Library of America volumes make a fine gift for any occasion. Now, with exactly one hundred volumes to choose from, there is a perfect gift for everyone.
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Inhalt

Alexander Hamiltons Conjectures About the
9
David Redick to William Irvine September 24 1787
15
An American Citizen Tench Coxe II September 28 1787
25
Cato I September 27 1787
31
Cato II October n 1787
37
James Madison to George Washington September 301787
42
Rev James Madison to James Madison c October i 1787
48
James Wilsons Speech at a Public Meeting October 6 1787
63
A Cumberland County Mutual Improvement
563
Publius The Federalist XXIII Alexander Hamilton
570
Diabolical Plots and Secret Machinations
581
Pluses and Minuses of the Constitution
589
Governor Edmund Randolphs Reasons for Not Signing
595
George Washington to Charles Carter December 27 1787
612
An Unrestrained Power of Taxation? On the Necessity
622
Agrippa James Winthrop IX December 28 1787
628

A Democratic
70
Centinel
77
Cincinnatus
92
I Have Answered All the Objections
105
O Sense Where Is Your Guard Shame Where
114
An Old Whig George Bryan et al I October 12 1787
122
A Citizen of America Noah Webster October 17 1787
129
Brutus I October 18 1787
164
A Citizen
176
A Political Dialogue October 24 1787
189
Thomas Jefferson Replies to Madison
209
Publius The Federalist I Alexander Hamilton
219
John Humble October 29 1787
224
Elbridge Gerry to the Massachusetts General Court
231
Letters from the Federal Farmer to The Republican
245
Timothy
289
George Washington to Bushrod Washington
305
Publius The Federalist VI Alexander Hamilton
311
Brutus III November 15 1787
317
Resolution of the Inhabitants of Pittsburgh
324
Publius The Federalist VIII Alexander Hamilton
333
Publius The Federalist IX Alexander Hamilton
339
George Mason Objections to the Constitution circulated
345
Civis Rusticus
353
Marcus James
363
Cato V November 221787
399
A Countryman Roger Sherman? II November 22 1787
412
Brutus IV November 29 1787
423
Publius The Federalist XIV James Madison
431
Americanus John Stevens Jr Ill November 30 1787
437
Agrippa James Winthrop III November 301787
443
Publius The Federalist XVI Alexander Hamilton
451
Americanus John Stevens Jr IV December 5 61787
457
Richard Henry Lee to Governor Edmund Randolph
465
John Adams to Thomas Jefferson December 6 1787
473
Publius The Federalist XXI Alexander Hamilton
481
Americanus John Stevens Jr V December 12 1787
487
Philadelphiensis Benjamin Workman
494
Publius The Federalist XXII Alexander Hamilton
507
Agrippa James Winthrop VI December 14 1787
517
Dissent of the Minority of the Pennsylvania Convention
526
Noah Webster December 31 1787
553
The New Roof Francis Hopkinson December 29 1787
662
Giles Hickory Noah Webster I December 1787
669
Publius The Federalist XXXIIXXXIII
678
Centinel Samuel Bryan VIII January 2 1788
686
Publius The Federalist XXXIV Alexander Hamilton
698
Samuel Osgood to Samuel Adams January 51788
704
The Republican to the People January 7 1788
710
Resolutions of the Tradesmen of the Town of Boston
717
Thomas B Wait to George Thatcher January 8 1788
727
Mark Antony January 101788
737
James Madison to Governor Edmund Randolph
744
Publius The Federalist XXXVII James Madison
754
Agrippa James Winthrop XII January n 15 18 1788
762
Publius The Federalist XXXVIII James Madison
774
Americanus John Stevens Jr VI January 12 1788
783
DEBATES IN THE STATE
789
John Smilie Responds to Wilson on the Lack
804
Robert Whitchill
811
William Findley on the Constitution as a Plan for National
818
James Wilson on the SlaveTrade Clause December 3 1787
829
James Wilsons Summation and Final Rebuttal
832
Benjamin Rush on Morality and Government
869
Connecticut Ratifying Convention January 39 1788
877
Governor Samuel Huntington on the Need for Coercive
885
Fisher Ames on Biennial Elections and on the Volcano
891
Major Martin Kinsley on the Excessive Powers
902
Abraham Holmes and Christopher Gore on the Possible
910
An Irrefutable
917
The Reverend Daniel Shute and Colonel William Jones
919
Samuel Nassons Pathetick Apostrophe to Liberty
925
Isaac Backus on Religion and the State Slavery
931
Nathaniel Barrell a Plain Husbandman Warns of
938
APPENDIX
947
The Articles of Confederation
954
Letter from the Constitutional Convention
965
Eiographical Notes
995
Chronology of Events i774i8o4
1055
Notes on State Constitutions 177690
1117
Notes
1137
Index
1195
Urheberrecht

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Über den Autor (1987)

Theodore Dreiser was born in Terre Haute, Indiana, on August 27, 1871. After a poor and difficult childhood, Dreiser broke into newspaper work in Chicago in 1892. A successful career as a magazine writer in New York during the late 1890s was followed by his first novel, Sister Carrie (1900). When this work made little impact, Dreiser published no fiction until Jennie Gerhardt in 1911. There then followed a decade and a half of major work in a number of literary forms, which was capped in 1925 by An American Tragedy, a novel that brought him universal acclaim. Dreiser was increasingly preoccupied by philosophical and political issues during the last two decades of his life. He died in Los Angeles on December 28, 1945.

Bibliografische Informationen