The Theory and Practice of Horticulture: Or, An Attempt to Explain the Chief Operations of Gardening Upon Physiological Graounds

Cover
Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1855 - 606 Seiten
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 352 - I think, somewhat earlier than upon other young trees of the same age, which grow upon stocks of their own species ; but the growth and vigour of the tree, and its power to nourish a succession of heavy crops, are diminished, apparently, by the stagnation, in the branches and stock, of a portion of that sap which, in a tree growing upon its own stem, or upon a stock of its own species, would descend to nourish and promote the extension of the roots.
Seite 358 - For if thou wert cut out of the olive-tree which is wild by nature, and wert graffed contrary to nature into a good olive-tree ; how much more shall these, which be the natural branches, be graffed into their own olive-tree...
Seite 195 - ... will arrest the radiant matter in its course, and return as much to the radiating body as it emits. The intervention of more substantial obstacles will, of course, equally prevent the result, and the balance of temperature will not be disturbed in any substance which is not placed in the clear aspect of the sky. A portion of a grass-plat, under the protection of a tree or hedge, will generally be found, on a clear night, to be eight or ten degrees warmer than surrounding unsheltered parts; and...
Seite 359 - They take three seeds — the citron, the lemon, and the orange — and carefully removing the external cuticle from both sides of one of them, and from one side of the two others, place the former between the latter, and, binding the three together with fine grass, plant them in the earth. From this mixed seed springs a tree, the fruit of which exhibits three distinct species included within one rind, the division being perfectly visible externally, and the flavour of each compartment as different...
Seite 216 - ... feet distant from the tree, on the east side of it; and I attached the tree to the stake, at the height of six feet, by means of a slender pole about twelve feet long; thus leaving the tree at liberty to move towards the north and south, or, more properly, in the segment of a circle, of which the pole formed a radius; but in no other direction. Thus circumstanced, the diameter of the tree from north to south, in that part of its stem which was most exercised by the wind, exceeded that in the...
Seite 492 - If it is desired to reproduce the larger, finer formed, or higher coloured bloom of a plant having a tall, straggling, or too robust a growth, or having too large or too coarse foliage in a plant without these drawbacks, I need not suggest to select, in another species of the same family, a plant of an opposite character and properties — say of dwarf compact growth, handsome foliage, and free flowering habit ; and if such can be obtained, work with it, making the latter the seed-bearer.
Seite 356 - ... from the purity of the parent stock. " It seems allowable," says Professor J. Lindley, " to infer that the goodness of cultivated fruits is deteriorated by their being uniformly worked upon stocks whose fruit is worthless. The common apple, when grafted upon trees bearing very austere fruit, is injured by the crude and bitter sap of the tree on which it has been grafted. On the contrary, it is improved by being grafted upon a stock superior to its own. A scion, also, taken from...
Seite 308 - One was first placed above the bud inserted; and upon the transverse section through the bark : the other, which had no further office than that of securing the bud, was applied in the usual way.
Seite 194 - ... to retain and fix it. But this unequal effect will only be perceived when the atmosphere is unclouded, and a free passage is open into space ; for even a light mist will arrest the radiant matter in its course, and return as much to the radiating body as it emits. The intervention of more substantial obstacles will of course equally prevent the result, and the balance of temperature will not be disturbed in any substance which is not placed in the clear aspect of the sky. A portion of a grass-plat...
Seite 172 - ... the ground and rendering it impervious, so that the descent of water to the roots is impeded, whether it is communicated artificially, or by the fall of rain. It is, therefore, doubtful whether artificial watering of plants in the open air is advantageous, unless in particular cases; and most assuredly, if it is done at all, it ought to be much more copious than is usual.

Bibliografische Informationen