The Spectator, Band 8

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Tonson, 1717
 

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Seite 267 - ... there is all Nature cries aloud Through all her works). He must delight in virtue ; And that which He delights in must be happy. But when ? or where ? This world was made for Caesar — I'm weary of conjectures — this must end them.
Seite 265 - Else whence this pleasing hope, this fond desire, This longing after immortality ? Or whence this secret dread and inward horror Of falling into...
Seite 140 - Pyrrhus's ring, which, as Pliny tells us, had the figure of Apollo and the nine Muses in the veins of it, produced by the spontaneous hand of nature, without any help from art.
Seite 74 - We make provisions for this life, as though it were never to have an end, and for the other life, as though it were never to have a beginning. Should a spirit of superior rank, who is a stranger to human nature, accidentally alight upon the earth, and take a survey of its inhabitants ; what would his notions of us...
Seite 57 - ... him. He knows that his helper is at hand, and is always nearer to him than any thing else can be, which is capable of annoying or terrifying him.
Seite 12 - The immoderate breadth of the features made me very much out of humour with my own countenance, upon which I threw it from me like a mask. It happened very luckily that one who stood by me had just before thrown down his visage, which it seems was too long for him.
Seite 57 - Though the whole creation frowns upon him, and all nature looks black about him, he has his light and support within him, that are able to cheer his mind, and bear him up in the midst of all those horrors which encompass him.
Seite 139 - In the next place, our critics do not seem sensible that there is more beauty in the works of a great genius who is ignorant of the rules of art, than in those of a little genius who knows and observes them.
Seite 13 - ... angry father. The graceless youth, in less than a quarter. of an hour, pulled the old gentleman by the beard, and had...
Seite 70 - He further added, that a single Ray of it dissipates Pain, and Care, and Melancholy from the Person on whom it falls. In short, says he, its Presence naturally changes every Place into a kind of Heaven.

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