British Moralists: Samuel Clarke. Balguy. Richard Price. Appendix : Balguy. Brown. John Clarke. Cudworth. John Gay. Hobbes. Kames. Locke. Mandeville. Paley. Wollaston

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Sir Lewis Amherst Selby-Bigge
Clarendon Press, 1897

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Seite 293 - To this war of every man, against every man, this also is consequent; that nothing can be unjust. The notions of right and wrong, justice and injustice, have there no place. Where there is no common power, there is no law: where no law, no injustice.
Seite 291 - Hereby it is manifest that during the time men live without a common power to keep them all in awe, they are in that condition which is called war; and such a war, as is of every man against every man.
Seite 291 - ... the nature of war, as it is in the nature of weather. For as the nature of foul weather lieth not in a shower or two of rain but in an inclination thereto of many days together, so the nature of war consisteth not in actual fighting but in the known disposition thereto during all the time there is no assurance to the contrary.
Seite 357 - the doing good to mankind, in obedience to the will of God, and for the sake of everlasting happiness.
Seite 291 - So that in the nature of man, we find three principal causes of quarrel. First, competition ; secondly, diffidence ; thirdly, glory. The first, maketh men invade for gain ; the second, for safety; and the third, for reputation.
Seite 299 - The passion of laughter is nothing else but sudden glory arising from some sudden conception of some eminency in ourselves, by comparison with the infirmity of others, or with our own formerly...
Seite 294 - A law of nature, lex naturalis, is a precept or general rule, found out by reason, by which a man is forbidden to do that, which is destructive of his life, or taketh away the means of preserving the same; and to omit that, by which he thinketh it may be best preserved.
Seite 293 - The passions that incline men to peace are fear of death, desire of such things as are necessary to commodious living, and a hope by their industry to obtain them.
Seite 260 - For these words of good, evil, and contemptible, are ever used with relation to the person that useth them: there being nothing simply and absolutely so; nor any common rule of good and evil, to be taken from the nature of the objects themselves...
Seite 290 - And as to the faculties of the mind, setting aside the arts grounded upon words, and especially that skill of proceeding upon general and infallible rules, called science ; which very few have, and but in few things ; as being not a native faculty, born with us; nor attained, as prudence, while we look after somewhat else, I find yet a greater equality amongst men than that of strength.

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