Kant and the Experience of Freedom: Essays on Aesthetics and Morality

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Cambridge University Press, 13.07.1996 - 449 Seiten
This collection of essays by one of the preeminent Kant scholars of our time transforms our understanding of both Kant's aesthetics and his ethics. Guyer shows that at the very core of Kant's aesthetic theory, disinterestedness of taste becomes an experience of freedom and thus an essential accompaniment to morality itself. At the same time he reveals how Kant's moral theory includes a distinctive place for the cultivation of both general moral sentiments and particular attachments on the basis of the most rigorous principle of duty. Kant's thought is placed in a rich historical context including such figures as Shaftesbury, Hutcheson, Hume, Burke, Kames, as well as Baumgarten, Mendelssohn, Schiller, and Hegel. Other topics treated are the sublime, natural versus artistic beauty, genius and art history, and duty and inclination. These essays extend and enrich the account of Kant's aesthetics in the author's earlier book, Kant and the Claims of Taste (1979).
 

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Inhalt

Preface
ix
Note on citations
xv
Introduction
1
KANTS AESTHETICS IN HISTORICAL CONTEXT
25
Feeling and freedom Kant on aesthetics and morality
27
The dialectic of disinterestedness I Eighteenthcentury aesthetics
48
The dialectic of disinterestedness II Kant and Schiller on interest in disinterestedness
94
The perfections of art Mendelssohn Moritz and Kant
131
The beautiful and the sublime
187
Nature art and autonomy
229
Genius and the canon of art a second dialectic of aesthetic judgment
275
Duties regarding nature
304
Duty and inclination
335
Notes
395
Bibliography
433
Index
441

Hegel on Kants aesthetics necessity and contingency in beauty and art
161
TOPICAL STUDIES
185

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