Trusting Leviathan: The Politics of Taxation in Britain, 1799-1914

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Cambridge University Press, 12.07.2007 - 456 Seiten
Martin Daunton's major study of the politics of taxation in the 'long' nineteenth century examines the complex financial relationship between the State and its citizens. In 1799, taxes stood at 20 per cent of national income; by the outbreak of the First World War, they had fallen to less than half of their previous level. The process of fiscal containment resulted in a high level of trust in the financial rectitude of the government and in the equity of the tax system, contributing to the political legitimacy of the British state in the second half of the nineteenth century. As a result, the State was able to fund the massive enterprises of war and welfare in the twentieth century. Combining new research with a comprehensive survey of existing knowledge, this lucid and wide-ranging book represents a major contribution to our understanding of Victorian and Edwardian Britain.
 

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Inhalt

Trust collective action and the state
The great tax eater the limits of the fiscalmilitary state 17991842
27
Philosophical administration and constitutional control the emergence of the Gladstonian fiscal constitution
53
A cheap purchase of future security establishing the income tax 18421860
72
Our real war chest the national debt war and empire
104
The sublime rule of proportion ability to pay and the social structure 18421906
131
The minimum of irritation fiscal administration and civil society 18421914
175
The right of a dead hand death and taxation
219
Athenian democracy the fiscal system and the local state 18351914
251
The end of our taxation tether the limits of the Gladstonian fiscal constitution 18941906
297
The modern income tax remaking the fiscal constitution 19061914
325
Conclusion
370
chancellors of the Exchequer 18411914
386
Bibliography
388
Index
414
Urheberrecht

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Über den Autor (2007)

Martin Daunton, FBA, is a fellow of Churchill College and professor of economic history at the University of Cambridge. He is the author of Progress and Poverty: An Economic and Social History of Britain, 1700-1850 (1995), and editor of Volume III of The Cambridge Urban History of Britain (2001).

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