Selected English Letters (XV-XIX Centuries)

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Mabel Duckitt
H. Milford, Oxford University Press, 1913 - 460 Seiten
 

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Seite 15 - Yet be it less or more, or soon or slow, It shall be still in strictest measure even To that same lot, however mean or high, Toward which Time leads me, and the will of Heaven ; All is, if I have grace to use it so, As ever in my great Task-Master's eye.
Seite 147 - World, that two papers, in which my Dictionary is recommended to the public, were written by your Lordship. To be so distinguished is an honour which, being very little accustomed to favours from the great, I know not well how to receive, or in what terms to acknowledge.
Seite 147 - When, upon some slight encouragement, I first visited your Lordship, I was overpowered, like the rest of mankind, by the enchantment...
Seite 304 - The waves beside them danced, but they Out-did the sparkling waves in glee: A poet could not but be gay In such a jocund company!
Seite 273 - I hear a voice, you cannot hear, Which says, I must not stay; I see a hand, you cannot see, Which beckons me away.
Seite 148 - I hope it is no very cynical asperity, not to confess obligations where no benefit has been received, or to be unwilling that the public should consider me as owing that to a patron, which Providence has enabled me to do for myself. " Having carried on my work thus far with so little obligation to any favourer of learning, I shall not be disappointed though I...
Seite 98 - People send to one another to know if any of their family has a mind to have the small•pox : they make parties for this purpose, and when they are met (commonly fifteen or sixteen together), the old woman comes with a nutshell full of the matter of the best sort of small-pox, and asks what vein you please to have opened.
Seite 147 - I had done all that I could; and no man is well pleased to have his all neglected, be it ever so little. "Seven years, my lord, have now past since I waited in your outward rooms or was repulsed from your door...
Seite 165 - At the foot of one of these squats me I, (il penseroso) and there grow to the trunk for a whole morning. The timorous hare and sportive squirrel gambol around me like Adam in Paradise, before he had an Eve ; but I think he did not use to read Virgil, as I commonly do there.
Seite 200 - Yet with all these disadvantages to call him down to humility, a Scotchman is one of the proudest things alive. The poor have pride ever ready to relieve them. If mankind should happen to despise them, they are masters of their own admiration, and that they can plentifully bestow upon themselves.

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