Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

N° 107. TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1753.

-Sub judice lis est.HOR.
And of their vain disputings find no end.-FRANCIS.

It has been sometimes asked by those, who find the appearance of wisdom more easily attained by questions than solutions, how it comes to pass, that the world is divided by such difference of opinion; and why men equally reasonable, and equally lovers of truth, do not always think in the same manner ?

With regard to simple propositions, where the terms are understood, and the whole subject is comprehended at once, there is such an uniformity of sentiment among all human beings, that for many ages, a very numerous set of notions were supposed to be innate, or necessarily co-existent with the faculty of reason: it being imagined, that universal agreement could proceed only from the invariable dictates of the uni. versal parent.

In questions diffuse and compounded, this simila. rity of determination is no longer to be expected. At our first sally into the intellectual world, we all march together along one straight and open road: but as we proceed further, and wider prospects open to our view, every eye fixes upon a different scene; we divide into various paths, and, as we move forward, are still at a greater distance from each other. As a question becomes more complicated and involved, and extends to a greater number of relations, disagreement of opinion will always be multiplied; not because we are irrational, but because we are finite beings, furnished with different kinds of knowledge, exerting different degrees of attention, one discovering consequences which escape another, none taking in all the concatenation of causes and effects, and most comprehending but a very small part, each comparing what he observes with a different criterion, and each referring it to a different purpose.

Where, then, is the wonder, that they who see only a small part should judge erroneously of the .whole ? or that they, who see different and dissimilar parts, should judge differently from each other?

Whatever has various respects, must have various appearances of good and evil, beauty or deformity; thus, the gardener tears up as a weed, the plant which the physician gathers as a medicine; and “a

general,” says Sir Kenelm Digby, “will look with “ pleasure over a plain, as a fit place on which the “ fate of empires might be decided in bạttle, which “ the farmer will despise as bleak and barren, neither “ fruitful of pasturage, nor fit for tillage.”

Two men examining the same question proceed commonly like the physician and gardener in selecting herbs, or the farmer and hero looking on the plain ; they bring mindsimpressed with different notions, and direct their inquiries to different ends; they form, therefore, contrary conclusions, and each wonders at the other's absurdity.

We have less reason to be surprised or offended when we find others differ from us in opinion, because we very often differ from ourselves. How often we alter our minds, we do not always remark; because the change is sometimes made imperceptibly and gradually, and the last conviction effaces all memory of the former : yet every man, accustomed from time to time to take a survey of his own notions, will by a slight retrospection be able to discover, that his mind has suffered many revolutions; but the same things have in the several parts of his life been condemned and approved, pursued and shunned : and that on many occasions, even when his practice has been steady, his mind has been wavering, and he has persisted in a scheme of action, rather because he feared the censure of inconstancy, than because he was always pleased with his own choice.

Of the different faces shewn by the same objects as they are viewed on opposite sides, and of the different inclinations which they must constantly raise in him that contemplates them, a more striking example cannot easily be found than twoGreek epigrammatists will afford us in their accounts of human life, which I shall lay before the reader in English prose.

Posidippus, a comic poet, utters this complaint: “ Through which of the paths of life is it eligible “ to pass ? In public assemblies are debates and “ troublesome affairs : domestic privacies are haunt“ed with anxieties; in the country is labour; on “ the sea is terror: in a foreign land, he that has

money must live in fear, he that wants it must pine in distress; are you married? you are trou« bled with suspicions; are you single? you languish

in solitude; children occasion toil, and a childless life is a state of destitution; the time of youth “ is a time of folly, and gray hairs are loaded with “infirmity. This choice only, therefore, can be “made, either never to receive being, or immediately to lose it.”

Such and so gloomy is the prospect, which Posidippus has laid before us. But we are not to acquiesce too hastily in his determination against the value of existence: for Metrodorus, a philosopher of Athens, has shewn, that life has pleasures as well as pains : and having exhibited the present state of man in brighter colours, draws with equal appearance of reason, a contrary conclusion.

“ You may pass well through any of the paths of “ ļife. In public assemblies are honours and trans" actions of wisdom ; in domestic privacy is still"ness and quiet : in the country are the beauties of “nature; on the sea is the hope of gain; in a “ foreign land, he that is rich is honoured, he that is

poor may keep his poverty secret; are you married ?

you have a cheerful house; are you single ? you are “ unincumbered; children are objects of affection; to “ be without children is to be without care: the time

of youth is the time of vigour, and gray hairs are “ made venerable by piety. It will, therefore, never

be a wise man's choice, either not to obtain ex, “ istence, or to lose it; for every state of life has its

felicity.”

In these epigrams are, included most of the questions which have engaged the speculations of the inquirers after happiness; and though they will

[ocr errors]

not much assist our determinations, they may, perhaps, equally promote our quiet, by shewing that no absolute determination ever can be formed.

Whether a public station, or private life be desirable, has always been debated. We see here both the allurements and discouragements of civil employments: on one side there is trouble, on the other honour; the management of affairs is vexatious and difficult, but it is the only duty in which wisdom can be conspicuously displayed: it must then still be left to every man to choose either ease or glory; nor can any general precept be given, since no man can be happy by the prescription of another.

Thus, what is said of children by Posidippus, " that they are occasions of fatigue,” and by Metrodorus, “that they are objects of affection,” is equally certain; but whether they will give most pain or pleasure, must depend on their future conduct and dispositions, on many causes over which the parent can have little influence: there is, therefore, room for all the caprices of imagination, and desire must be proportioned to the hope or fear that shall happen to predominate.

Such is the uncertainty in which we are always likely to remain with regard to questions, wherein we have most interest, and which every day affords us fresh opportunity to examine: we may examine, indeed, but we never can decide, because our facul. ties are unequal to the subject : we see a little, and form an opinion; we see more, and change it.

This inconstancy and unsteadiness, to which we must so often find ourselves liable, ought certainly to teach us moderation and forbearance towards

« ZurückWeiter »