Aguecheek's Beef, Belch's Hiccup, and Other Gastronomic Interjections: Literature, Culture, and Food Among the Early Moderns

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University of Chicago Press, 15.09.2008 - 376 Seiten
We didn’t always eat the way we do today, or think and feel about eating as we now do. But we can trace the roots of our own eating culture back to the culinary world of early modern Europe, which invented cutlery, haute cuisine, the weight-loss diet, and much else besides. Aguecheek’s Beef, Belch’s Hiccup tells the story of how early modern Europeans put food into words and words into food, and created an experience all their own. Named after characters in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night, this lively study draws on sources ranging from cookbooks to comic novels, and examines both the highest ideals of culinary culture and its most grotesque, ridiculous and pathetic expressions. Robert Appelbaum paints a vivid picture of a world in which food was many things—from a symbol of prestige and sociability to a cause for religious and economic struggle—but always represented the primacy of materiality in life. Peppered with illustrations and a handful of recipes, Aguecheek’s Beef, Belch’s Hiccup will appeal to anyone interested in early modern literature or the history of food.

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Inhalt

1 Aguecheeks Beef Hamlets Baked Meat
1
2 The Sensational Science
33
3 The Cookbook as Literature
66
4 The Food of Wishes From Cockaigne to Utopia
118
5 Food of Regret
155
6 Belchs Hiccup
201
7 Cannibals and Missionaries
239
Crusoes Friday Rousseaus Emile
287
Notes
307
Select Bibliography
343
Index
363
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Seite 158 - I' the commonwealth I would by contraries Execute all things: For no kind of traffic Would I admit; no name of magistrate; Letters should not be known ; riches, poverty, And use of service, none; contract, succession, Bourn, bound of land, tilth, vineyard, none; No use of metal, corn, or wine, or oil; No occupation; all men idle, all, And women too, but innocent and pure : No sovereignty— Seb.
Seite 158 - Treason, felony, Sword, pike, knife, gun, or need of any engine Would I not have ; but nature should bring forth Of its own kind, all foison, all abundance, To feed my innocent people.
Seite 231 - Strength should be lord of imbecility, And the rude son should strike his father dead: Force should be right; or rather, right and wrong, Between whose endless jar justice resides, Should lose their names, and so should justice too. Then every thing includes itself in power, Power into will, will into appetite; And appetite, an universal wolf, So doubly seconded with will and power, Must make perforce an universal prey, And last eat up himself.
Seite 133 - Medway fail thy dish, Thou hast thy ponds, that pay thee tribute fish, Fat aged carps, that run into thy net, And pikes, now weary their own kind to eat. As loth the second draught, or cast to stay, Officiously at first themselves betray.
Seite 26 - Hamlet, where' s Polonius? HAM. At supper. KING. At supper? where? HAM. Not where he eats, but where he is eaten; a certain convocation of politic worms are e'en at him. Your worm is your only emperor for diet; we fat all creatures else to fat us, and we fat ourselves for maggots...
Seite 186 - if thou well observe The rule of not too much, by temperance taught, In what thou eat'st and drink'st, seeking from thence Due nourishment, not gluttonous delight, Till many years over thy head return : So mayst thou live, till like ripe fruit thou drop Into thy mother's lap, or be with ease Gathered, not harshly plucked, for death mature...
Seite 21 - Holds such an enmity with blood of man, That, swift as quicksilver, it courses through The natural gates and alleys of the body ; And, with a sudden vigour, it doth posset And curd, like eager droppings into milk, The thin and wholesome blood...
Seite 158 - They say, he is already in the forest of Arden, and a many merry men with him ; and there they live like the old Robin Hood of England. They say, many young gentlemen flock to him every day ; and fleet the time carelessly, as they did in the golden world.
Seite 172 - Than savages could suffer: thou didst drink The stale of horses, and the gilded puddle, Which beasts would cough at: thy palate then did deign The roughest berry on the rudest hedge ; Yea, like the stag, when snow the pasture sheets, The barks of trees thou...

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Über den Autor (2008)

Robert Appelbaum is professor of English literature at Uppsala University, Sweden.

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