Life and Conversations of Dr. Samuel Johnson: (founded Chiefly Upon Boswell).

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Chapman and Hall, 1874 - 441 Seiten
 

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Seite 63 - Having carried on my work thus far with so little obligation to any favourer of learning, I shall not be disappointed though I should conclude it, if less be possible, with less ; for I have been long wakened from that dream of hope, in which I once boasted myself with so much exultation, " My Lord, " Your Lordship's most humble " Most obedient servant,
Seite 62 - When, upon some slight encouragement, I first visited your Lordship, I was overpowered, like the rest of mankind, by the enchantment...
Seite 113 - I believe, Sir, you have a great many. Norway, too, has noble wild prospects ; and Lapland is remarkable for prodigious noble wild prospects. But, Sir, let me tell you the noblest prospect which a Scotchman ever sees is the high road that leads him to England !" ' This unexpected and pointed sally produced a roar of applause.
Seite 247 - Knowledge is of two kinds. We know a subject ourselves, or we know where we can find information upon it.
Seite 218 - Please to make my most respectful compliments to all the ladies, and remember me to young George and his sisters. I reckon George begins to show a pair of heels. " Do not be sullen now, but let me find a letter when I come back. "I am, dear Sir, " Your affectionate humble servant,
Seite 102 - I found that I had a very perfect idea of Johnson's figure, from the portrait of him painted by Sir Joshua Reynolds soon after he had published his Dictionary, in the attitude of sitting in his easy chair in deep...
Seite 357 - Poor stuff! No, Sir, claret is the liquor for boys ; port for men ; but he who aspires to be a hero (smiling) must drink brandy.
Seite 148 - He answered, he was not, for he had pretty well told the world what he knew, and must now read to acquire more knowledge. The King, as it should seem with a view to urge him to rely on his own stores as an original writer, and to continue his labours, then said " I do not think you borrow much from any body." Johnson said, he thought he had already done his part as a writer. " I should have thought so too, (said the King,) if you had not written so well.
Seite 198 - When Sir Joshua mentioned this to Dr. Johnson, he was much displeased with the actor's conceit. 'He'll be of us, (said Johnson) how does he know we will permit him ? The first Duke in England has no right to hold such language.
Seite 227 - Sir, you have no reason to be afraid of me. The Irish are not in a conspiracy to cheat the world by false representations of the merits of their countrymen. No, Sir ; the Irish are a FAIR PEOPLE ; — they never speak well of one another.

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