The Journal of International Relations, Band 1

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George Hubbard Blakeslee, Granville Stanley Hall, Harry Elmer Barnes
Clark University., 1911
 

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Seite 501 - Love took up the harp of Life, and smote on all the chords with might; Smote the chord of Self, that, trembling, pass'd in music out of sight.
Seite 299 - That the United States extend its aid to Liberia in the prompt settlement of pending boundary disputes; (2) that the United States enable Liberia to refund its debt by assuming as a guarantee for the payment of obligations under such arrangement the control and collection of the Liberian customs...
Seite 307 - German inquirer, states that whoever confesses that there is but one God, and that Mohammed is his prophet, is a true Moslem, although to be a good one it is necessary to observe the five points of confession, prayer, fasting, almsgiving, and pilgrimage...
Seite 487 - In Spain, where, besides, some diluted Negro blood came in with the Moors, we find a remarkable remembrancer of the black man in the field of art. In one of the churches of Seville are to be seen four beautiful pictures (Christ bound to a column, with St. Peter kneeling at his side; St. Joseph; St. Anne; Madonna and Child), the work of the mulatto, Sebastian Gomez, the slave, then the pupil, the companion and the equal of his master, the great painter Murillo, who had him made a free citizen of Spain,...
Seite 489 - Songhai in the early part of the 16th century, was certainly the equal of the average European monarchs of the time and the superior of many of them. Among the Bantu peoples of South Africa (eg, the Zulus, etc.), great capacity for survival by means of political and social organization has been shown in some cases and also considerable advance toward the ultimate creation of a Christian Negro nation at some time in the future. One of the Bantu peoples, the Ovampo...
Seite 493 - Ethnology teaches that the real African need by no means resort to the rags and tatters of bygone European splendor. He has precious ornaments of his own, of ivory and plumes, fine plaited willow ware, weapons of superior workmanship. Nothing more beautiful, for instance, can be imagined than an iron club carefully wound round with strips of metal, the handle covered with snake skin.* *Leo Frobenius, "The Origin of African Civilizations...
Seite 379 - There are two ways in which a Government can act. The first is to start from things as it finds them, putting its veto on what is dangerous or unjust, and supporting what is fair and equitable in the usages of the natives, and letting system and legislation wait upon occasion.
Seite 283 - It is unnecessary to argue that the duty of the United States toward the unfortunate victims of the slave trade was not completely performed by landing them upon the coast of Africa, and that our nation rests under the highest obligation to assist them, so far as they need assistance, toward the maintenance of free, orderly, and prosperous civil society.
Seite 282 - Paris was instructed to make inquiries on the subject, and he was reminded in his instructions that when it was considered that the United States had founded and fostered the nucleus of native representative government on the African shores, and that Liberia, so created, had afforded a field of emigration and enterprise for the emancipated Africans of America, who had not been slow to avail themselves of the opportunity, it was evident that the United States Government must feel a peculiar interest...
Seite 494 - ... and elsewhere in ancient Egypt of the derivation of iron from the south at a comparatively late stage of civilization; and the comparative lateness also of its appearance in the ancient cultures of Asia, the Mediterranean region and northern and Occidental Europe. It should check our racial pride a little to consider the possibility, perhaps, rather, the certainty, that "at a time when our own ancestors still utilized stone implements or, at best, when bronze implements were first introduced,...

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