The Critical and Miscellaneous Prose Works of John Dryden, Now First Collected ...

Cover
H. Baldwin and Son, 1800
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Ausgewählte Seiten

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite viii - The clauses are never balanced, nor the periods modelled : every word seems to drop by chance, though it falls into its proper place. Nothing is cold or languid : the whole is airy, animated, and vigorous ; what is little, is gay ; what is great, is splendid.
Seite 133 - With public zeal to cancel private crimes. How safe is treason and how sacred ill, Where none can sin against the people's will, "Where crowds can wink and no offence be known, Since in another's guilt they find their own ! Yet fame deserved no enemy can grudge ; The statesman we abhor, but praise the judge.
Seite 382 - He sought the storms ; but for a calm unfit, Would steer too nigh the sands, to boast his wit Great wits are sure to madness near allied, And thin partitions do their bounds divide; Else, why should he, with wealth and honour blest, Refuse his age the needful hours of rest?
Seite 471 - ... out of the country with one : however, in spite of my bashfulness and appearance, I used now and then to thrust myself into Will's, to have the pleasure of seeing the most celebrated wits of that time, who used to resort thither.
Seite 124 - I have sent you herewith a libel, in which my own share is not the least. The king having perused it, is no way dissatisfied with his. The author is apparently Mr Dr[yden], his patron, Lord M[ulgrave,] having a panegyric in the midst.
Seite 169 - Tis enough for one age to have neglected Mr. Cowley and starved Mr. Butler ; but neither of them had the happiness to live till your Lordship's ministry.
Seite 140 - tis for parents to forgive! With how few tears a pardon might be won From nature, pleading for a darling son!
Seite 452 - He was of very easy, I may say, of very pleasing access ; but something slow, and, as it were, diffident in his advances to others. He had something in his nature, that abhorred intrusion into any society whatsoever.

Bibliografische Informationen