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right to as much as would feed and clothe as well as instruct every poor child within its boundaries; others have only enough to clothe and instruct; others only enough to instruct; others again only sufficient to instruct a part; with all manner of degrees between enough to instruct a part only; and enough to instruct, feed, and clothe the whole; and that he was determined to see justice done to the poor; and in this particular temptation removed from the rich. The honest of the nation would be knit together as the heart of one man in such a cause; and though many would severely deplore his individual loss of unworthy gain, he would, in common with others, save so much by those and other funds being honestly administered, that he would join the nation's voice, not of popular clamour only, but on a point where the really good, peaceable, and wise, would be the most earnest ; and he would say, well, let it be so; and before two months had passed over, if he were a wise man, and had a son whom he had intended to have put into his place herein, he would say to himself, in his secret thought, I am glad my son will not be tempted to act as I have done. But, until there be some legislative enactment hereon, can

can we refrain from charitably advising such of the clergy, and others, as rob the poor of the means of instruction, of food, raiment, lodging, and other necessaries, honestly and promptly to retrace their steps ?*

As the investigation of a committee of the House of Commons has substantially proved the fact, that hundreds of thousands of English children are at all times being defrauded of those rights which are most essential to their interests, and to the welfare of society; and as nothing has yet been found to grapple with the evil, why not establish in one functionary the office of minister of education and benevolence, whose duty should be the investigation and complete control (through

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Remembering who it was who said, “Woe unto you scribes and pharisees, hypocrites, for ye devour widows' houses, and for a pretence make long prayers, therefore ye shall receive the greater damnation.” Indeed, such should deeply weigh the whole of the twenty-third chapter of Matthew; for while they rob others, they also rob their own souls.

local committees appointed by him) of all benevolent institutions, except those under the care of their own founders.

CHAP. VII.

ENGLISH HIERARCHY AND ROMISH HIERARCHY.

It has been observed by Henry Gally Knight, that Catholics and Protestants live in harmony in all countries where the governments interfere not between them; a sound and valuable observation; But is our government, and are the people of England also, prepared to give up that most extensive of all modern interference, that five-sevenths of a population of seven millions, said to be the most destitute of any civilized nation of the present day, are compelled to contribute to the functionaries of a religion which they detest, one half perhaps as much as the revenue of all the clergy of the continent of Europe ? Thus the poorest population - have to support the richest hierarchy — by the most extravagant supplies—and they do not belong to the same religion ;-is not this a four-fold anomaly, each aggravating all the rest ?

Now grant the Papists what they call emancipation ; falsely, it appears, first, because they are not in bondage, and therefore their case does not admit of emancipation; secondly, because the inapplicable term has evidently been originated to infuse into the case an excitement of pity for one side, and an abhorrence towards the other, through the medium of a sentiment known to be inapplicable by its originators.

But grant what is called Catholic emancipation, take them by wholesale into the houses of parliament, into the cabinet, into the various boards under government, as presidents, commissioners, and secretaries, will the poor Irish peasant cease to feel the gripe of the tithe-proctor, who tears from him the best of what he has ? thus keeping the whole family in rags, and denying them all food, but the potatoes and a little butter-milk.

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