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bant=limited. Humum=his lands. - 637. Auro. Gr. 414. 2. A. & S. 247. I. — 638. The golden apples of the Hesperides (see on XI. 144) are here made the property of Atlas himself. — 640. Mihi. See on v. 635. — 641. Rerum; sc. gestarum. 643. Themis. See on I. 321. — 644. Auro. Gr. 425. A. & S. 251. - 645. Titulum: honor. Praedae. Gr. 384. II. A. & S. 223. Jove natus; not Perseus, but Hercules, who killed the dragon and stole the apples. — 647. Moenibus. Gr. 414. 4. A. & S. 247. 3. Servanda. Gr. 565. 3. 2). A. & S. 274, R. 7 (a). – 650. Mentiris

you falsely claim. Longe tibi absit=be far from protecting you. Gr. 491. A. & S. 262 and R. 5. - 652. Dictis. Gr. 385. 5. A. & S. 223, R. 2. — 653. Viribus. Gr. 429. A. & S. 250. I.

Atlanti. Gr. 391. I and 2. 4) (2). A. & S. 222, R. I and R. 2 (a) and (6). — 654. Parvi. Gr. 402. III. 1. A. & S. 214, R. I (a) (1). Gratia=friendship. 655. Munus. Gr. 705. IV. A. & S. 324. 4.

- 656. Retro, turning his face aside; that he might not himself be changed to stone. Squalentia=horrida ; i. e. bristling with serpents. -658. Abeunt = mutantur. Compare the description of Atlas, Virg. A. IV. 246–251. — 659. Summo. Gr. 441.6. A. & S. 205, R. 17. — 662. The ancients believed that Atlas supported the heavens on his head, or his shoulders. Cf. Virg. A. IV. 247.

663. Hippotades = Aeolus, the son, or, as some say, the grandson of Hippotes, a king of Troy. He was king of the winds. Cf. Virg. A. I. 52 foll. — 664. Admonitor operum=who calls men to the labors of the day. Cf. v. 629. — 665. Ille Perseus. Pennis is here the dative the poetical construction for pennas alligat pedibus. Gr. 384. II. · A. & S. 223. — 666. Telo=the harpe, or short curved sword, which Mercury had given him. Cf. v. 727. 667. Talaribus the winged sandals of Mercury. See on v. 616, and cf. Virg. A. IV. 239. — 669. Cepheaque=of Cepheus, a king of Aethiopia. It is from Cepheüs. The more common form is Cepheia, which is found in some MSS. — 670. Maternae=of her mother, Cassiope, Cassiopea, or Cassiepea, who, by boasting of her beauty, had offended the Nereids. They, in revenge, had induced Neptune to inundate the territories of Cepheus; and, to appease them, the oracle of Ammon had directed that Andromeda should be bound to a rock and exposed to a sea-monster. Cepheus, Cassiope, and Andromeda were afterwards placed among the stars. Milton, in Il Penseroso, speaks of Cassiope as

that starred Ethiop queen, that strove To set her beauty's praise above

The sea-nymphs, and their powers offended. 671. Ammon, or Hammon, was an Ethiopian deity whom the Greeks and Romans identified with Zeus, or Jupiter. He had a famous temple and oracle in the oasis of Ammonium (now Siwah) in the Libyan desert. See on Virg. A. IV. 198. — 672. Simul=simul ac, as often. Brachia. Gr. 380. A. & S. 234. II. – 673. Abantia. des = Perseus. See on v. 607. — 674. Moverat. Gr. 511. A. & S. 261, R. 6. (Cf. 259, N.) — 675. Trahit... ignes = he is enamored. - 676. Correptus = charmed, fascinated. — 678. Catenis. Gr. 419. IV. A. & S. 244. — 679. Quibus; sc. catenis. Gr. 414. 4. A. & S. 247. 3. — 680. Requirenti; sc. mihi. Terrae=patriae tuae. - 681. Geras. Gr. 525. A. & S. 265. — 683. Celasset. See on I. 152. Gr. 510. A. & S. 261. 1. — 684. Quod potuit = which she could do; i. e. though she could not cover her face. 685. Instanti; i. e. Perseus. Fateri.

Gr. 552. I.

A. & S. 271, R. 4. 686. Nolle. Gr. 549. 4. I). A. & S. 272, R. 6. Videretur. Gr. 491. A. & S. 262 and R. 5. — 687. Quantaque - formae : " how much her mother had presumed upon her beauty.” See on v. 681. — 689. Ponto. Gr. 422. 2. A. & S. 255, R. 3 (6). — 690. Possidet=premit, tenet. - 692. Ambo miseri. Gr. 439. 2. I). A. & S. 205, R. 2 (1). Justius = with the greater reason; since she had been the cause of the calamity. — 693. Tempore. See on v. 678. — 696. Opem ... ferendam. Gr. 562 ; 565 and 1. A. & S. 275. II. and R. 3. 697. Hanc; i. e. Andromeda. Peterem. Gr. 510. A. & S. 261. 1. Illa; i. e. Danaë. See on v. 611. — 699. Gorgonis. See on v. 615. Alis. See on v. 616. — 701. Praeferrer

-gener = I ought surely to be preferred to all (others) as a son-inlaw. 702. Dotibus; referring to his heroism and his renown, Faveant. Gr. 505. A. & S. 263. 2 (1). — 703. Ut- paciscor

- I stipulate that she shall be mine, if saved by my valor. Gr. 578. III. A. & S. 274. 3 (a). — 704. Dubitaret. Gr. 486. II. A. & S. 260, R. 5. - 705. Super=insuper. Dotale as a dowry.

707. Juvenum ; i. e. the rowers. — 708. Sic fera =so does the monster (plough the waters). Undis. Gr. 431. A. & S. 257. 709, 710. Tantum – coeli=It was as far from the rocks as the distance in mid-air (quantum medii coeli), which a Balearic sling can traverse with its whirled bullet. The inhabitants of the Balearic islands were famous as slingers. Leaden balls were sometimes used for slinging. — 711. Tellure. See on undis, v. 708. - 712. Ardu.

abiit=soared aloft. Gr. 443. 2. A. & S. 205, R. 15 (a) and (6). Summo. See on v. 659. 714. Jovis praepes

the eagle of Jove. Vacuo=aperto. 715. Phoebo= to the sun ; i. e. basking in the sunshine. — 716. Occupat aversum = comes upon him from behind. Neu and that he may) not. Retorqueat. Gr. 491. A. & S. 262. — 717. Cervicibus; poetic plural and ab. lative = in cervice. 718. Inane. See on v. 621. Volatu. Gr. 414 3. A. & S. 247. 2. — 720. Inachides = Perseus; because he

us ...:

R. I.

was born at Argos, Inachos was the first king and most ancient hero of Argos. — 721. Sublimis. See on arduus, v. 712. 722. Subdit; sc. se=dives bencath. So versat. Aquis. See on equis, v. 634. -725. Patent=

t=are exposed ; i. e. terga, costae, cauda.- 727. Ense. Sec on v. 666. —-729. Graves; " by anticipation,” since it expresses the result of adspergine. Pennae; i. e. of Perseus. — 730. Bibu. lis=wet, dripping. Talaribus. See on v. 665. 731. Summo vertice with its topmost point. Gr. 414. 3. A. & S. 247. 2. 732. Stantibus - moto rises above the waters when they are still, is covered by the sea when disturbed. On aquis, see on v. 689.

– 733. Eo=thither ; i. e. to the rock. — 734. Repetita=struck again and again. Cf. V. 473. - 735. Cum plausu clamor plausus et clamor. Cf. I. 319, and Virg. A. I. 292. — 736. Generum; sc. eum. Gr. 373. i and 2. A. & S. 230. So auxilium (sc. eum esse) and servatorem. Cf. Gr. 551. I. A. & S. 272 and 230,

- 738. Catenis. Gr. 425. 2. 2). A. & S. 251. – 739. Pretium and causa. Gr. 363. A. & S. 204. - 741. Laedat. Gr. 491. A. & S. 262. 743. Phorcynidos = daughter of Phorcys ; a sea-god, the father of the Gorgons, the Graeae, the Hesperian dragon, and Scylla. See on v. 774. --- 744. Recens=just broken off. Bibula ... medulla=the porous pith. — 745. Rapuit expresses the suddenness of the transformation. Hujus, in a construction like this, is very rarely found without a noun. — 746. Ramis. Gr. 429. A. & S. 250. I.

- 749. Iterant jactata = jactant et iterant = they throw again and again, scatter, sow. Gr. 579. A. & S. 274. 3 (6).750. Curaliis. Gr. 384. I. A. & S. 223. — 751. Tacto . ab aëre from the contact of the air. Capiant. Gr. 494. A. & S. 262. So fiato

753. Dis — ponit to three gods he erects as many altars of turf: to Mercury, who had loaned him the talaria, the sword, and a helmet ;

to Pallas, who had furnished him with a shield ; and to Jupiter, his father. — 754. Virgo=Pallas, or Minerva, goddess of war as well as of wisdom. 756. Alipedi; i. e. Mercury, from the talaria. Deorum. Gr. 396. III. 2. 3) (2). A. & S. 212, R. 2 (3). — 757. Et ... praemia even the reward ; in apposition with Andromeden. — 758. Indotata = without a dowry; i. e. without thought of the dowry that had been promised. See v. 705.. Like rapit, it expresses the eagerness of Perseus to make her his own. Hymenaeus Hymen, the god of marriage. He is generally represented as a youth, bearing the nuptial torch. Amor Cupid. 759. Praecutiunt. Torches were carried before the bride as she was led to the house of her husband. — 762. Argumenta. Gr. 363. A. & S. 204. — 764. Cephenum=of the Ethiopians; the people of Cepheus. See on v. 669. Convivia. Gr. 371. 4. 1). A. & S.

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233 (3). -765. Epulis. Gr. 419. I. A. & S. 245. I. Munere ; i. č. with wine. Gr. 414.4. A. & S. 247. 3. - 766. Diffudere=cheered, exhilarated. Cultusque - locorum the mode of life and the history of the country; i. e. of the people of the country. 768. Lyncides; in apposition with unus quidam. 769. Simul simul ac. -770. Perseu. Gr. 94.1. A. & S. 81, R. — 771. Abstuleris. Gr. 525. A. & S. 265. Crinita - - ora the head (of Medusa) bristling with serpents. Gr. 414. 2. A. & S. 247. 1. — 772. Agenorides. Most of the editors speak of Agenor as the great-grandfather of Perseus ; but according to the best authorities, Perseus was descended from Belus, the twin-brother of Agenor. His mother, Danaë, was the daughter of Acrisius, the son of Abas, the son of Lynceus and Hypermnestra, the former of whom was the son of Aegyptus, the latter the daughter of Danäus; and Aegyptus and Danäus were twin sons of Belus. See on v. 607. Some read Abantiades instead of Agenorides ; some think the inaccuracy a slip of the pen which Ovid would have corrected, had he revised the poem. See Life. Perhaps gelido sub Atlante is another slip of the kind. Atlas had been changed to stone before this time, it is true, but so recently that Perseus would hardly speak of him as a well-known mountain, especially in relating events that had taken place previous to his transformation. — 773. Molis ; i. e. of mountains. — 774, 775. Geminas — Phorcidas

the Graeae, daughters of Phorcys (see on v. 743), who had gray hair from their birth, and only one tooth and one eye in cominon, which they used by turns. There were three of them, but Ovid here speaks of but two. 776. Dum traditur=while it is passing ; i. e. as one is handing it to the other. — 777. Supposita ... manu; i.e. by putting his hand in the place of that of the sister who was about to take the eye. Perseus refused to return the eye until the Graeae told him how to find the Gorgons. Cepisse and the other infinitives in the passage depend on narrat, v. 772. Gr. 551. I. A. & S. 272. – 779. Gorgoneas -domos =he reached the home of the Gorgons ; three frightful beings, with snaky hair, brazen claws, and enormous teeth. Of the three, Medusa alone was mortal.

See on v. 743. – 780. The last syllable of the verse is cut off by synalopha. Gr. 669. I. A. & S. 307. 3. - 781. Ex ipsis ; i. e. from their natural state. — 782. Clypei limits aere; the brass of the shield, i. e. the brazen shield. — 783. Repercusso=reflecting; as if repercutienti. -786. Pegason = Pegasus; a winged horse, the offspring of Medusa. In modern times he has become famous as the horse of the Muses; but with the ancients he had no connection with the Muses except producing with his hoof the inspiring fountain Hippocrene. His brother was Chrysaor. For the form Pegason, see Gr. 46. 1. A. & S. 54. – 788. Freta =waters, seas. Alto. See on v, 621.

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METAMORPHOSES. BOOK V.

THE STORY OF CERES AND PROSERPINA.

A hymn in honor of Ceres, which the Muse Calliope sings in a contest with the Pierides, the nine daughters of Pierus, king of Emathia. The Muses themselves are often called Pierides, from Pieria, near Mount Olympus, where they were first worshipped by the Thracians.

341. Prima. See on I. 89. Ceres, the Greek Demeter, was the goddess of the earth and the protectress of agriculture. She was the daughter of Saturn (Chronos) and Rhea. See on I. 123, and cf. Virg. G. I. 147. 342. Mitia culta, cultivated, in distinction from that which grows spontaneously. Cf. I. 103. - 343. Leges; since agriculture is the basis of civilization. Hence she is called legifera. Cf. Virg. A. IV. 58. — 344. Mihi. Gr. 388. I. A. & S. 225. III. Modo = only. Possem. Gr. 488. I. and 1. A. & S. 263. 1. - 345. Dea and carmine. See on IV. 678. - 346. Giganteis. Here the giant Typhoeus is represented as buried under Mount Aetna. Homer and Virgil (A. III. 578) put Enceladus there. Gr. 398. 2. A. & S. 211, R. 4 (a). — 347. Trinacris (or Trinacria) = Sicily, so called from its three promontories. — 348. Aetherias — sedes - Typhoeus, who dared to aspire to the celestial abodes ; referring to the revolt of the giants against the gods. On ausum, see Gr. 577. A. & S. 274. 3 (a). - 349. Resurgere. Gr. 553. V. A. & S. 273. 2 (6). – 350. Peloro = Pelorum, or Pelorus (now Capo di Faro), the promontory opposite Italy; hence Ausonian. 351. Pachyne, the southern promontory, now Capo di Passaro. Tibi; sc. subjecta est. Lilybaeo = Lilybaeum, now Capo di Boco or di Marsala, on the western coast. Gr. 414. 2. A. & S. 248. II. -353. Ore. Gr. 422. 2. A. & S. 255, R. 3 (0). So corpore, v. 355, and sede, v. 359. — 356. Rex ... silentum= Pluto. Silentium is inadmissible in hexameter

- 357. Pateat=patescat. Gr. 492. 4 and 1). A. & S. 262 and R. 7. So retegatur and terreat. — 358. Trepidantes; “by anticipation.” See on IV. 729.

361. Ambibat. A. & S. 182, R. 3. Fundamina. Gr. 371. 4. A. & S. 233. — 362. Exploratum est. Gr. 556. I. (1). A. & S. 209 (5). - Labare. Gr.

A. & S. 269 (6). — 363. Erycina = Venus, who had a temple on Mount Eryx, in the northern part of Sicily. Cf. Virg. A.

- 365. Arma, manus, and potentia are in apposition with nate. Ovid had in mind Virg. A. I. 664 - 368. In the division of the universe among themselves, the first lot fell to Jupiter, the second to Neptune, the third (novissima) to Pluto. See on I. 113. -370. Ipsum=Neptune. - 371. Tartara cessant : why do,

verse.

Gr. 295. 3.

549 and 1.

V. 759.

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