Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

on =

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

the desired shore. Gr. 422. 1. 2). A. & S. 254, R. 3. 636. Nax.

Naxos ; an island in the Aegean, the largest of the Cyclades, famed for its fertility, its wines, its marble, and one of the chief seats of the worship of Bacchus. Cf. Virg. A. III. 125. Gr. 379. 3. 2). A. & S. 237, R. 5 (6). Liber; a name often given to Bacchus, probably from liberare, and=he who frees from care. 637. Mihi. See on v. 582. Vobis. Gr. 391. 1. A. & S. 222, R. 1. - - 638. Fallaces ; sc. nautae. - 639. Sic fore=that so it shall be. Gr. 297. III. 2; 551. I. A. & S. 154, R. 3 ; 272. Dare. Gr. 551. II. and i.

A. & S. 273. 2 (d). Carinae. See on v. 593. — 640. Dextera : =on the right. Gr. 148. 3. I). A. & S. 106. Dextra ; sc. manu=to the right hand. Some editors give dextra (abl.) instead of dextera. The vessel was bound from Chios to Delos (see V. 597), and Naxos lay to the right of its course. - 641, 642. Quis tenet. The order of translation is : “ Quis te furor tenet, Acoete ? " pro se quisque inquit. Some read: “ · Quis te furor” -, inquit Opheltes, Pro se quisque timet: laevam pete !” making quis te furor

an instance of aposiopesis. See Gr. 704. I. 3. A. & S. 324. 33. The passage is probably corrupt. Nutu. Gr. 414. 4. A. & S. 247. 3. — 643. Velit. See on v. 603. Aure=in aurem. 644. Capiatque ... dixi

et dixi : Capiat, etc. Gr. 488. I. A. & S. 260, R. 6. Aliquis == some one else. 645. Ministerio. Gr. 425. 2. 2). A. & S. 251. Artis=the fraud; but some consider it=my office. Cf. Virgil, A. II. 106. - 647. Scilicet=forsooth; marking the irony. Gr. 705. IV. A. & S. 324. 4.

649. Naxo. Gr. 431. A. & S. 257. Petit diversa (sc. loca) etc. = he steers in a different direction, leaving Naxos; i.e. the way to Naxos. 651. Senserit. Gr. 503. II. ; 506. A. & S. 263. 2 (1). — 653. Mihi. Gr. 388. 3. A. & S. 225. II. - 655. Fallitis. Gr. 508. A. & S. 261, R. 1. 656. Lacrimas. Gr. 371. 3. I). A. & S. 232 (2) and N. 1. 658. Per. The separation of the preposition from the accusative is very common in oaths. Praesentior =more present; i. e. of more immediate power, either to reward or punish. Cf. Virg. E. I. 42. Illo. See on quo, v. 615. — 659, 660. Tam — fide=that I am telling you things as true as they are incredible; or, as they surpass what one would believe to be true. Aequore. Gr. 422. 1. 2). A. & S. 254, R. 3. - 661. Siccum navale=a dry dock. The ships of the ancients, when not in use, were drawn up on shore. Teneret. Gr. 503. II. ; 506. A. & S. 263. 2 (1). — 663. Deducunt = draw down (from the antennae, or yards), i. e. spread them to the wind. Geminaque ope; i. e. with both oars and sails. — 664. The ivy (which was sacred to Bacchus) impedes the oars by twining about them. - 665. Distringunt=stretch; i. e. weigh down; or, as some editors translate it, occupy, fill. Corymbis. Gr. 414.4. A. & S.

[ocr errors]

247. 3. — 666. Frontem. Gr. 380. A. & S. 234. II. So curvamina, v. 672. — 667. Hastam; i. e. the thyrsus, a staff twined with ivy and vine leaves, which Bacchus is generally represented as bearing. Cf. XI. 7, 28. — 668. The animals named were sacred to Bacchus. Simulacra inania=empty images, or phantoms.- 669. Pictarum

= spotted. — 672. Depresso=flattened (into a fish); or, as some translate it, bowed down ; i. e. no longer erect in human form. 674. Loquenti; sc. ei = while he was speaking. Gr. 387. A. & S. 226. — 676. Obstantes. Cf. v. 664. — 678. Manus. Gr. 362. 3. I). A. & S. 210 (6). So pinnas. Esse. Gr. 551. I. A. & S. 272. Vocari. Gr. 552. 1. A. & S. 271. — 681. Corpore. Gr. 414. 3. A. & S. 247. 2.

Novissima extrema. Gr. 441. 6. A. & S. 205, 682. Sinuantur :

=are curved. - 683. Dant saltus. See on v. 599. — 685. Inque - speciem and sport like a company of dancers.

Cf. Virg. A. V. 594. - 686. Naribus efflant spout from their nostrils. Gr. 422. 2. A. & S. 242. — 688, 689. Pavidum; sc. me. Corpore. Gr. 429. A. & S. 250. I. Vixque meum= and scarcely myself. - 690. Corde. See on v. 686. Tene hold your course towards ; steer for. Diam; an old name of Naxos. — 691. Sacris. Gr. 386. A. & S. 224.

R. 17.

METAMORPHOSES. BOOK IV.

THE STORY OF PYRAMUS AND THISBE. (vv. 55 – 166.] This story is found in no other ancient writer whose works have come down to us.

56. Puellis. Gr. 386. A. & S. 224. — 58. Coctilibus of brick. Semiramis; a queen of Assyria, who built Babylon (urbem) with all its wonders. The legends concerning her and Ninus, her husband, whom she succeeded as sovereign (according to some of the myths, she murdered him), are various and conflicting. — 59. Gradus; sc. amoris. 60. Tempore. Gr. 414. 3. A. & S. 247. 2. Taedae — coissent=they would have been united in marriage. · Torches were borne before the bride on her way to the house of the bridegroom ; hence taeda is often used, by metonymy, for marriage. Cf. Virg. A. IV. 339. See Gr. 512. A. & S. 261, R. 4. Here the condition is implied in Sed patres.

- 61. Quod. Gr. 445. 7. A. & S. 206. (13) (a). — 62. Ex aequo=equally. Captis=captivated. — 63. Conscius; used substantively. — 64. Quoque magis and the more. The correlative eo is to be supplied with the second magis. — 65. Quam duxerat=which it had got; had

come to have. — 66. Quum fieret=when it was built. Gr.518. II. 1. A. & S. 263, R. 2. Domui. Gr. 391. I. A. & S. 222, R. I. 67. Nulli; for nemini=by no one. Gr. 388. 4. A. & S. 225. II. - 68. Primi. See on prima, I. 89. For the gender, see Gr. 439. 2. I). A. & S. 205, R. 2 (1), where the principle is explained. — 70. Murmure. Gr. 414. 3. A. & S. 247. 2. — 74, Quantum erat = how much it would be ; i. e. how little it would be. Gr. 705. IV. A. & S. 324. 4. On erat, see Gr. 475. 4. A. & S. 259, R. 3 and (d). Sineres. Gr. 516. II. and 1. A. & S. 262, R. 2. So pateres, next line. Corpore. Gr. 414. 3. A. & S. 247. 2. 75. Danda. Gr. 562; 565. I. A. & S. 275. II. and R. 3. — 77. Quod. Gr. 554. IV. ; 558. A. & S. 273. 5. Verbis. Gr. 384. A. & S. 223. So parti, v. 79. 78. Diversa sede; i. e. on opposite sides of the wall. — 79. Dedere. Gr. 461 and 3. A. & S. 209, R. II (4). 81. Ignes; i. e. the stars. — 84. Nocte. Gr. 426. A. & S. 253. - 85. Tentent. Gr. 491; 480 ; 558. II. 1. A. & S. 262; 258. I.; 273. I, N. I. On foribus, see Gr. 422. 2. A. & S. 255, R. 3 (6). — 86. Domo. Gr. 424. 2.

A. & S. 255, R. 1. Exierint. Gr. 518. II. A. & S. 263. 5 and R. I. - 87. Neve - arvo = and lest they should miss each other while wandering in the broad fields. Sit errandum. Gr. 301. 2 ; 388. I.; 491. A. & S. 184. 3 ; 262 and R. 5. Arvo. Gr. 422. 1. 2). A. & S. 254, R. 3. - 88. Conveniant and lateant are in the same construction as tentent and relinquant. Nini. See on v. 58. His tomb, built by-Semiramis, was large and magnificent. — 89. Pomis. Gr. 429. A. & S. 250. 1. — Fonti. See on domui, v. 66.

-91. Lux=the sun. — 92. Aquis. Gr. 384 and 2. I). A. & S. 225. IV. and R. 2. Cf. II. 68. Isdem. See on III. 592. Cf. Virg. A. II. 250. — 93. Cardine. Gr. 431. A. & S. 257. Cf. Virg. A. III. 448. – 94. Suos - her friends. Gr. 441. I. A. & S. 205, R. 7. Vultum. Gr. 380. A. & S. 234. II. So rictus, v. 97. — 96. Audacem; sc. eam. — - 97. Caede= sanguine. Oblita; (i short) from oblinere. Gr. 651. 3 ; 654. A. & S. 284, Ex. I (2) (a); 285. 1. — 98. Depositura. Gr. 578. V. A. & S. 274, R. 6 (a). Sitim. Gr. 85. III. 2. A. & S. 79 (6) 2. -101. Dumque fugit. Gr. 467. 4. A. & S. 259. I (c). Tergo. See on foribus, v. 85. 103. Dum redit. See on v. IOI. Sine ipsa

without herself; i. e. Thisbe. - 106. Ore. Gr. 429. A. & S. 250. 1. -109. Vita. Gr. 419. IV. A. & S. 244 - 110. Nostra est=I am guilty. — 111. Venires. Gr. 492. 2 ; 493. 2. A. & S. 262 and R. 4. — 112. Prior. Gr. 443. 2. A. & S. 205, R. 15 (6). -115. Timidi. Gr. 401 ; 402. I. A. & S. 211, R. 8 (3) and (a). Optare. Gr. 549 and 1. A. & S. 269, R. 2.

- 118. Haustus is a noun, object of accipe. — 119. Quoque et quo; referring to ferrum. — 121. Humi. Gr. 424. 2. A. & S. 221, R. 3. - 122-124. Fistula=a water-pipe; which bursts (scin

[ocr errors]

551. I. 1.

ditur) from a defect in the lead (vitiato plumbo) of which it is made. Longas aquas =a stream of water. - 125. Arborei fetus = the fruit of the tree. Gr. 398. 2.

A. & S. 211, R. 4 (a). Caedis. See on v. 97. – 128. Ne fallat - that she may not disappoint. Gr. 491. A. & S. 262 and R. 5. — 130. Vitarit. Gr. 525. A. & S. 265. So sit, v. 132. Narrare. Gr. 552. I.

A. & S. 271. 131. In arbore is not precisely the same as arboris. What she recognizes in the tree is its form, not the color of its fruit. — 132. Incertam; sc. illam, referring to Thisbe. Haeret - sit= she is doubtful whether this is the tree. 133, 134. Tremebunda solum=she sees the quivering body lying on the bloody earth. Gr.

A. & S. 272 and R. 5. Buxo. Gr. 417. A. & S. 256. 2. -135. Instar. Gr. 380.2. A. & S. 232 (3). — 136. Summum its surface. – 137. Suos amores her lover. — 138. Indignos; i. e. not deserving such treatment. Claro plangöre with loud blows. — 139. Comas. See on vultum, v. 94. – 140. Cruori. Gr. 385. 5. A. & S. 224, R. 3. - 142. Mihi. Gr. 385. 4. A. & S. 224, R. 2. — 145. Thisbes. Gr. 43. A. & S. 44. Morte. Gr. 414. 2. A. & S. 247. 1. —

- 147. Ense. Gr. 399. 5. 3). A. & S. 250. 2 (1). — 148. Ebur the ivory scabbard. -149. Mihi. Gr. 387. A. & S. 226. In unum hoc = for this one deed ; i. e. for death. — 150. Est; sc. mihi. Hic - vires - This (i. e. love) will give me strength for the death-blow; literally, for wounds. — 154. Hoc ... estote rogati but grant this ; literally, be ye entreated this. Gr. 374. I. A. & S. 234. I. — 155. Meus illiusque=mine and his; referring to parentes. Gr. 398. 3 ; 369. 2 (or it may be explained by 185). A. & S. 211, R. 3 (6). ; 105, R. 3. — 156, 157. Ut... non invideatis = not to refuse. Gr. 493. I. A. & S. 262, R. 5, fine print. Novissima=the last. Componi. Gr. 551. II. 1. A. & S. 273. 4 (a). Tumulo. See on arvo, v. 87. — 162. Mucrone. Gr. 431. A. & S. 257. Imum. Gr. 441. 6. A. & S. 205, R. 17. — 163. Ferro. Gr. 386. A. & S. 224. So rogis, v. 166. - 166. Quodque — rogis and (their ashes) which remained from the funeral pile.

THE STORY OF PERSEUS (vv. 604 – 789). — This story follows that of the transformation of Cadmus and his wife Hermione into serpents, which had taken place in fulfilment of the prediction uttered by Mars when Cadmus killed the dragon sacred to that god. See III. 98.

604. Ambobus; i. e. Cadmus and Hermione, or Harmonia. Formae. Gr. 396. II. A. & S. 211 and R. 2. – 605. Nepos; i. e. Bacchus, whose mother, Semele, was the daughter of Cadmus. 606. India. In the course of his wanderings in Asia, Bacchus is said to have conquered India. Achaia; a part of Greece, here put for the whole. — 607, 608. Abantiades ... Acrisius Acrisius,

the son of Abas; descended from Belus, the twin brother of Agenor, the father of Cadmus : hence, ab origine cretus eadem. - Moenibus. Gr. 425. 2. 2). A. & S. 251. Arceat. Gr. 501. II. A. & S. 264. 10. — 609. Argolicae. Acrisius was king of Argos, or Argolis, a district of Peloponnesus. The city Argos was its capital. - 610.. Deum is genitive plural, limiting genus. Gr. 45. 5. 4). A. & S. 53. Jovis; 'sc. genus, or filium. 611. Persea Perseus ; the son of Jupiter, by Danaë, the daughter of Acrisius. Warned by an oracle that his grandson would kill him, Acrisius shut Danaë up in a brazen tower; but Jupiter entered it in the form of a shower of gold. After the birth of Perseus, he and his mother were exposed in an ark, which floated to Seriphos, where it was found by a fisherman, who carried the mother and child to Polydectes, king of the island. Perseus grew up to manhood and performed many wonderful exploits, some of which are here related. In the course of his adventures, he came to Larissa, and at the public games, accidentally killed an old man, who proved to be his grandfather Acrisius. -612. Praesentia the power. Cf. III. 658. - 613. Violasse. See on I. 152. So agnosse. Nepotem=divinam nepotis originem. — 614. Poenitet. Gr. 556. I. A. & S. 215, R. (middle). Alter Bacchus. At alter = Perseus. -615. Monstri= Medusa, the Gorgon. See vv. 769-789. — 616. Tenerum = tenuem, which is the more common epithet. Alis; i. e. the wings which Mercury had lent him. See v. 665. — 617. Liby

See on II. 237. Penderet. Gr. 518. 1. A. & S. 263, R. 2. 619. Animavit in angues=animavit et formavit in angues. - 620. Infesta colubris ; a form of expression admissible in prose also. Cf. Sallust (Jugurtha, 89), infesta serpentibus. Gr. 419. III. A. & S. 250. 2.

621. Immensum coelum. Cf. inane, v. 718; alto, v. 788, etc. — 622. Exemplo like. Gr. 414. 3. A. & S. 247. 2. — 624. Orbem. Gr. 371. 4. 2). A. & S. 233 (3). 625. Arctos. See on II. 132 and 171. Cancri. See on II. 83. — 628. Hesperio... orbe in the western part of the world. Regnis. Gr. 363. A. & S. 204. — 629. Lucifer. Cf. II. 115. – 630. Evocet. Gr. 522. II. A. & S. 263. 4. Aurora; sc. evocet. See on II. 113. Diurnos; i. e. of the sun.

631. Hominum. Gr. 396. III. 2. 3) (4). A. & S. 212, R. 2, N. 6. Cunctos. Some editions have cunctis. Praestare, to excel, takes the accusative or the dative, in both prose and poetry. The dative is the more common in Ovid. Corpore. Gr. 429. A. & S. 250. 1. - 632. Tapetionides; a Greek form of the patronymic. Atlas was the son of Japetus, and king of Mauritania. Ultima

the farthest to the west. - 634. Cf. II. 68. Equis. Gr. 386 and 1. A. & S. 224 and N. 1. Axes = currum. 635. Illi=of his. Gr. 398. 5. A. & S. 211, R. 5 (1). Cf. Virg. G. I. 14, 15. - 636. Preme

cas,

« ZurückWeiter »