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also solitae, in next line. - 235. Vertitur=he turns (himself). The word is used reflexively, like the middle voice in Greek. Sanguine. Gr. 414. 2. A. & S. 247. 1 (2), - 236. Abeunt=mutan. tur. — 238. Est. (sc. ei)=he has. 239. Idem = iidem. - 240. Non .. una = not one alone. Perire. Gr. 552. 3. A. & S. 244, R. 2 (6) and 270, R. I (6). - 241. Erinnys. The Furies were Alecto, Megaera, and Tisiphone. They were employed by the gods to punish the impious, both on the earth and in the lower world. 242. Jurasse. See on v. 152. Gr. 551, I. A. & S. 272, N. 1. Putes. Gr. 486. I. A. & S. 260. II. Dent. Gr. 487. A. & S. 260, R. 6. Ocius. Gr. 444. I.

A. & S. 122, R. 3. - 243. Sententia;

SC. mea.

THE DELUGE AND THE STORY OF DEUCALION AND PYRRHA. (vv. 244-415.] - 244. Probant. Gr. 461. 1. A. & S. 209, R. 11. Frementi; sc. ei. Gr. 386. 1. A. & S. 224, N. 1. — 245. Partes - implent=fulfil their part by assent; an allusion to the Roman senate. 246. Dolori. Gr. 390. I. A. & S. 227. - 247. Sit futura. Gr. 481. III. 1. ; 525. A. & S. 260, R. 7 (2) ; 265. Mortalibus. Gr. 399. 5. 3). A. & $. 250. 2 (1). — 249. Feris. Gr. 384. II. A. & S. 223. Paret. See on sit, v. 247. - 250. Sibi... curae. See on dolori, v. 246. Fore depends on the verbum dicendi implied in vetat. Gr. 530. II. 1. A. & S. 270, R. 2 (6). - 251. Trepidare vetat. Gr. 551. II. 1. A. & S. 273, 2 (a). - 252. Populo. Gr. 391. A. & S. 222, R. 1. Origine mira of miraculous origin. - 253. Erat ... sparsurus. Gr. 228. A. & S. 162. 14. - 254. Sacer sacred; because it is the home of the gods. -255. Conciperet. Gr. 492. 4. 1). A. & S. 262, R. 7. Axis; for heaven itself. —256. Esse. The clause, affore, etc., is the subject of esse. Gr. 551. I. 3. A. & S. 239, R. 4; 272, N. 1. Esse in fatis=that it is fated; i. e. the Fates had decreed. The three Fates, or Parcae, were the supreme arbiters of the destinies, not only of men, but of the gods themselves. Even Jupiter must submit to them. Their names were Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos. — 258. Ardeat. Gr. 501. I. A. & S. 264. 6 and N. 1. Laboret=shall perish. -259. Cyclopum. The Cyclopes were the workmen of Vulcan, (see on II. 5,) and made the thunderbolts of Jupiter. Cf. Virgil, A. III. 569 foll. and Horace, C. I. 4.7.-261. Perdere is in apposition with poena. Gr. 553. II. A. & S. 204, R. 9; 273, N. 9, where this use of the infin. should be added. - 262. Aeoliis ... antris = in the caves of Aeolus. The Aeolian (now Lipari) islands, near Sicily, were the abode of the winds, over whom Aeolus was king. Cf. Virg. A. I. 52 foll. Aquilonem=the north wind; which, in Italy, generally brings dry weather. Cf. v. 328. – 263. Inductas; sc. coelo. 264. Notum=the south wind; which brings rain. - 265.

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Vultum. Gr. 380. A. & S. 234. II. and R. I. -266. Capillis. Gr. 422. 2. A. & S. 255, R. 3 (6). — 267. Fronte; poetic abl. of place. See on v. 92. Sinusque = and the folds of his robe. - 270. Junonis. Juno was the sister and wife of Jupiter, and the queen of heaven. Iris, daughter of Thaumas (whence she is called Thaumantias) and Electra, was the goddess of the rainbow, and the attendant and messenger of Juno. Colores. Gr. 374. 7. A. & S. 234, R. 1 (a). -- 271. Concipit= draws up. Nubibus. Gr. 386. 1. A. & S. 224, N. 1. - 272. Colonis. Gr. 398. 5. A. & S. 211, R. 5 (1). — 274. Coelo. See on v. 226. - 275. Frater=Neptune, brother of Jupiter, and god of the sea. See on v. 113. — 277. Hortamine. Gr. 419. I. A. & S. 245. I. — 278. Utendum; sc. mihi. Gr. 301. 2; 388. I. A. & S. 184. 3; 225. III, and R. 1. 279. Domos = fountains. The source of the stream was the home of the river-god. Mole=literally, the dam or barrier ; here, whatever confines or restrains the river. -- 280. Fluminibus. Gr. 386. A. & S. 224

Totas - habenas =give loose reins. — 281 Fontibus. Gr. 398. 5. A. & S. 211, R. 5 (1). — 282. Volvuntur. See on vertitur, v. 235. – 286. Satis

crops. 287. Penetralia; the inmost part of the house, the shrine of the Penates; here temples. Sacris the images of the gods. — 288. Qua. Gr. 190. 1 & 2. A. & S. 137, R. (3). Mansit. Gr. 508. A. & S. 261, R. 1. — 289. Malo. Gr. 385. A. & S. 223, R. 2. — 290. Pressae=submerged. - 292. Erat. Gr. 462. 2. A. & S. 209,

Some editions have erant. Ponto. Gr. 386. 2. A. & S. 226, R. 2. -293. Hic; sc. homo. Cymba; poetic abl. of place. See on v. 92. —294. Ducit=plies. Ararat. Gr. 234. A. & S. 162. 7 (a). — 296. Summa. Gr. 441. 6. A. & S. 205, R. 17. 297. Figitur. See on mansit, v. 288. - 302. Nereides. See on v. 192. – 303. Ramis. Gr. 386. A. & S. 224. Agitata. See on congestos, v. 153. - 305. Fulminis; a common metaphor in descriptions of the boar. Apro. Gr. 385. A. & S. 223, R. 2. So quibus. v. 311. – 307. Terris. Gr. 431. A. & S. 257. Possit. Gr. 486. III. A. & S. 264, R. 3.

311. Pars; sc. hominum. 312. Inopi victu by want of food. — 313. Aonios (sc. agros) = Aonia, or Boeotia, a district of Greece, N. W. from Attica. Oetaeis

- Thessalian ; Oeta being a mountain range of Thessaly. Phocis, a district lying west of Boeotia, on the Corinthian gulf. The prose order is, Phocis, terra ferax, dum terra fuit, Aonios ab Oetaeis arvis separat. -- 314. Tempore. Gr. 426. 2. -316. Verticibus. Gr. 428. A. & S. 211, R. 6. - 317. Nomine. Gr. 429. A. & S. 250. 1. Parnasus, or Parnassus, was sacred to Apollo and the Muses. 318. Deucalion; son of Prometheus, and King of Phthia, in Thessaly. -319. Consorte tori; his wife Pyrrha, daughter of

R. 9.

93. 2.

Epimetheus and Pandora. — 320. Corycidas =Corycian; from a cave in Parnasus. Numina; sc. cetera. — 321. Themin. Gr..

A. & S. 80 and Ex. 2. Themis, the daughter of Coelus and Terra, was the goddess of right, or justice, and held the Delphic oracle ( tunc oracla tenebat) as the successor of Terra and previous to Apollo. Oracla; syncopated form of oracula. - 322. Illo=Deucalion. Gr. 417. A. & S. 256. 2. So illa (= Pyrrha) in next line. Aequi. Gr. 399. 2. I); 441. A. & S. 205, R. 7 (2); 213. - 324. Stagnare to be overflowed. Gr. 551. I. A. & S. 272.

So superesse. — 325. Ovid is fond of repetitions like this. Unum; sc. hominem. 326. Unam; sc. feminam. — 328. Nimbis. Gr. 431. A. & S. 257. So telo, v. 330, and signo, v. 334. — Aquilone. Gr. 414. 4. A. & S. 247. 3. 329. Aethera. Gr. 93. I. A. & S. 80, R. So aëra, v. 337. — 330. Telo=tridente. See v. 283. — 331. Pelagi. Gr. 47. II. A. & S. 51. — 332. Humeros. Gr. 380. A. & S. 234. II. Innato murice with native purple. Murex, a shell-fish from which a purple dye was obtained. — 333. Tritona

: Triton, son of Neptune and Amphitrite, and herald of the sea. gods. Conchae. Gr. 386. A. & S. 224. — 334. Inspirare. Gr. 551. II. 1. A. & S. 273. 2 (d). - 335. Illi. Gr. 388. 3. A. & S. 225. II. — 336. In - imo=which increases in width from the end of the cone ; i. e. the mouth-piece. On imo, see Gr. 441. 6. A. & S. 205, R. 17. - 337. Concepit aera = has received the air ; has been blown. — 338. Voce replet=fills with its blast. Sub

· Phoebo under each Phoebus ; i. e. from the east to the west. Phoebus (the Bright) is the title of Apollo as the Sun-god. — 339. Tunc quoque refers back to v. 281; as they had then obeyed, so now also. A. & S. 306. – 340. Cecinit receptus sounded the retreat. In prose we have cecinit receptui. — 341. Undis. Gr. 388. 4. A. & S. 225. II. The waves are personified. 342. Quibus. Gr. 445. 8. A. & S. 206 (3). Omnes ; sc. undas. — 345. Undis. Gr. 431. A. & S. 257. — 346. Diem. Gr. 120. A. & S. 90. 1. N. Nudata; sc. aquis, not foliis ; as shown by fronde in next line. Some, however, make fronde = ramis. - 348. Redditus erat : had reappeared. Apertum; sc. esse. Gr. 551. I. A. & S. 272. - 349. Terras, subject, silentia, object, of agere. - 351. O soror, o conjux; i. e. thou who art my all. — 352. Patruelis origo. See on vv. 318, 319. Prometheus and Epimetheus were sons of Japetus. — 353. Deinde is here, as often in verse, a dissyllable. See on dei, v. 339. -354, 355. Terrarum ... turba=the whole population of the earth. - 356, 357. Haec — satis =

we have not yet sufficiently certain assurance of our lives. — 358. Tibi Gr. 387; 204. I.

A. & S. 226 and 'R. 2. Si . . . erepta fuisses. Gr. 510. A. & S. 261. I. So haberet, v. 361. - 359. Animi. Gr.

= on

396. III. 2. 3), (3). A. & S. 212, R. 3. - 360. Posses. Gr. 486. II. A. & S. 260, R. 5. Quo- doleres ?=who would console you in your grief? Gr. 431. A. & S. 257. — 361, 362. See on v. 325.. - 363. O utinam. Gr. 669. I. 2. A. & S. 305 (1). Possem. Gr. 488. 1 & 2. A. & S. 263. I & R. Paternis artibus =by my father's art; as my father, Prometheus, made men of clay, and ani. mated them with fire stolen from heaven. — 364. Terrae. See on conchae, v. 333. - 366. Visum; sc. est. — 367. Placuit (sc. iis)

it pleased them; they resolved. 368. Sortes = oracle. 369. Cephisidas; Greek form of the acc. pl. 3d decl. See Gr. 98. A. & S. 85, Ex. 2, which apply to adjectives as well as nouns.

The Cephisus, or Cephissus, was the chief river of Phocis, flowing past Parnasus and Delphi. There was a large river of the same name in Attica, and several of less note in other parts of Greece. Undas. Gr. 386. 3.

A. & S. 233 (3). — 370. Ut-secantes : which, though not yet clear, were flowing in their wonted channel. — 371. Inde =ex Cephiso. Libatos liquores = they had sprinkled the consecrated waters; as an act of purification before entering the Temple. — 372. Vestibus. Gr. 386. 1. A. & S. 224. — 373. Deae Themis. See v. 321. — 374. Pallebant = were foul. Pallere is used of any unnatural, sickly color. — 376. Humi the ground. Gr. 424. 2. A. & S. 221, R. 3. — 378. Remollescunt. Gr. 508. A. & S. 261, R. I. - 379. Dic. Gr. 237. A. & S. 162. 4. Themi. Gr. 94. 1. A. & S. 81, R.—380. Sit. Gr. 525. A. & S. 265. Fer. See on dic, v. 379. Mersis =ruined. Rebus fortunes. Gr. 384. II. A. & S. 223. — 381. Templo. Gr. 422. 2. A. & S. 255, R. 3 (6). — 383. Parentis limits ossa. — 385. Prior. Gr.

A. & S. 205, R. 15 (6). Jussis. Gr. 385. A. & S. 223, R. 2. — - 386. Det. Gr. 493. 2. A. & S. 262, R. 4. — 387. Jactati. See on congestos, V. 153. - 388. Caecis latebris =involved in dark mystery. — 390. Promethiades. Gr. 316. A. & S. 100. I (a) and (6). So Epimethida, on which see also Gr. 93. I. A. & S. 80. I. - 391. Aut fallax-nobis - either my penetration is at fault. Nobis, for mihi. Gr. 387. A. & S. 226. — 394. Dici. Gr. 551. I. A. & S. 272. - 395. Augurio-interpretation, explanation. Titania= Pyrrha, who was the granddaughter of Japetus, one of the Titans. Mota est. Gr. 516. I. A. & S. 263. 2 (4). — 396. Spes - est=but her hope is mingled with fear. 397. Monitis. See on jussis, v. 385. Quid. Gr. 380. 2. A. & S. 232 (3).

399. Sua post vestigia=post terga sua. - 400. Credat. Gr. 486. II. A. & S. 260, R. 5. Nisi - vetustas=if antiquity were not witness for it; i. e. if it had not been believed for ages. On sit, see Gr. 509. A. & S. 261, R. 3. — 402. Mora=gradually ; after a time. Ducere formam=to take shape ; to assume a new

443. 2.

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form. - 403. Tlis; dat. with contigit. - 404 - 407. Ut - signis. The English order is, Ut quaedam forma hominis potest videri,- non sic manifesta, sed uti coepta de marmore, non satis exacta, simillimaque rudibus signis. Cf. v. 370. De marmore coepta=just begun in marble. Simillima. Gr. 163. 2. A. & S. 125. 2. Signis statuis. Gr. 391. I. A. & S. 222, R. 1. - 407, 208. Quae whatever part of them was moist with any fluid and earthy, was changed into flesh; literally, for the use of the body. Corpus = Versa est ; sc. ea pars. - 410. Vena the vein in the stone. 411. Spatio. See on tempore, v. 314.

Numine. Gr. 414. 2. A. & S. 249. II. 412. Faciem virilem took the form of

- 413. Et — jactu=and woman (the female race) was restored by the throwing of the woman ; i. e. from the stones thrown by Pyrrha. — 414. Inde - sumus ; imitated from Virgil, G. I. 63. Laborum. Gr. 399. 2. I). A. & S. 213. — 415. Simus. Gr. 525. A. & S. 265. Origine. Gr. 425. 3. I). A. & S. 246.

men.

METAMORPHOSES. BOOK II.

THE STORY OF PHAËTHON.- Phaëthon was the son of Phoebus, or Apollo, and the nymph Clymene, the daughter of Oceanus. His divine origin having been called in question by Epaphus, the son of Jupiter and Io, he appeals to his mother, who, after assuring him that he is the son of Phoebus, advises him to go to the god himself for proof of the truth of her story. He sets out at once, and Ovid here tells us the result of his visit to his father.

1. Columnis. Gr. 429. A. & S. 250. I.-2. Pyropo. Pliny makes the pyropus an alloy of copper and gold. Flammas imitans is a literal translation of its Greek name. - 3. The prose order is, Cujus fastigia summa cbur nitidum tenebat. Cujus refers to regia. 5. Mulciber=Vulcan, the Roman god of fire, identified with the Greek Hephaistos, son of Jupiter and Juno, or, according to later traditions, of Juno alone. His father, in a fit of anger, kicked him out of heaven, and after falling a whole day, he alighted on the island of Lemnos, which became his favorite abode. Other volcanic islands also, as Lipara, Imbros, and Sicily, are called his abodes, or workshops. Homer places his workshop in a splendid palace on Olympus. The palaces of all the gods were built by him, and the ancient poets abound in descriptions of marvellous and beautiful things which he made for gods and men. The ancients derived the name Mulciber from mulcere, to soften, and ferrum, iron. — 6. Caelarat. Gr.

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