Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB
[ocr errors]

uti. Verbis minoribus - less arrogant language. Gr. 419. I. A. & S. 245. I. — 152. Animos pride. Sed enim = at vero. Conjugis - Amphion, who was famous for his skill in music. 153. Genus. See vv. 172 - 176. — 154. Illi. Gr. 385. A. & S. 223, R. 2. Placerent. Gr. 515. I. A. & S. 263. 2. —156. Dicta foret = dicta esset. Gr. 510. A. & S. 261. 1. Si - fuisset=if she had not seemed to herself so (and been vain of it). — 157. Tiresia = Tiresias, a celebrated prophet of Thebes. Gr. 425. 3. I). A. & S. 245. Manto, also called Daphne, inherited her father's skill in divination. — 159. Ismenides = Thebaides (v. 163); from the river Ismenus, which flows through Thebes. - 160. Latona was generally worshipped only in conjunction with her children. — 161. Lauro. The laurel was sacred to Apollo. Gr. 414. 4. A. & S. 247. 3. The usual construction would be crinibusque innectite laurum. [Gr. 386. 1. A. & S. 224.]—162. Ore. Gr. 414. 4. A. & S. 247. 3. Paretur. Gr. 301. 3. A. & S. 184. 2 (a) and (6). — 163. Jussis. Cf. I. 399; III. 105. — 165. Celeberrima=stipata. — 166. Vestibus. Gr. 414. 2.

A. & S. 247. I. Auro. Gr. 428. A. & S. 211, R. 6. — 167. Quantum ira sinit restricts formosa. — 169. Alta; i. e. haughtily erect. — 170. Quis - coelestes what madness is this, to place gods of whom you have only heard before those whom you have seen ? - 171. Per here denotes, not the means, but the wide extent, and throughout. — 172. Tantalus, king of Lydia, or, as some say, of Argos, was invited to the table of the gods, but, having divulged to men the secrets which he heard there, was punished in the lower world by being placed in a lake whose waters receded when he tried to relieve his burning thirst, while over his head hung tempting fruits which ever eluded his grasp. Hence our word tantalize. Auctor = pater. - 173. Cui. Gr. 385. A. & S. 223, R. 2, N. (6). Licuit. Gr. 556. I. A. & S. 269, R. 2. - 174. Pleiadum. See on III. 595. Some legends make Taygete the mother of Niobe. Atlas. See IV. 632 -662. — 176. Jupiter was the father of Tantalus. Socero - illo I boast him too as my father-in-law. Amphion was a son of Jupiter. Gr. 414. 2. A. & S. 247. 1. - 177. Cadmi= Cadmus, the founder of Thebes. See III. 1 - 130. - 178. Domina. Gr. 363. A. & S. 204. Fidibusque. The walls of Thebes had risen to the music of Amphion's lyre. - 181. Accedit eodem to this is added. 182. Dea. See on V. 345. Huc to this ; moreover. - 183. Habeat. Gr. 525. A. & S. 265. — 185. Quoque et quo. Titanida; i. e. Latona, daughter of the Titan Coeus. Coeo. See on Tiresia, v. 157. - 186. Cui; i. e. Latonae. - 187. Pariturae. When Latona was about to become a mother, the jealous Juno bound all the countries of the earth by an oath not to allow her a resting-place. - 190. Dixit; sc. Delos. Neptune

[ocr errors]

I

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

suppose that

provided an asylum for Latona by raising the island Delos, which had previously floated under the sea, and making it fast. Cf. Virgil, A. III. 75 foll. -- 192. Uteri = offspring. — 193. Neget. Gr. 486. II. A. & S. 260, R. 5. So dubitet. - 195. Cui. See on illi, v. 154. Possit. Gr. 501. IV. A. & S. 264. 4. 196. Eripiat. Gr. 515. I. ; 516. II. 1. A. & S. 262, R. 2. 197. Excessere = have gone beyond ; i. e. have precluded. Fingite — meorum some part of this multitude of my children may be taken away from me. On populo, see Gr. 385. 4. A. & S. 224, R. 2. — 199. SpoLiata=when thus bereaved. — 200. This line is given up by most of the commentators as hopelessly corrupt. Of the many readings, no one is satisfactory, and the conjectures of the critics do not mend. the matter. Turba — orba may be translated : How far does she differ from the childless multitude ? - 201. Sacris. Gr. 422. 2. A. & S. 255, R. 3 (6). So capillis. — 202. Ponite deponite, as often. — 203. Quodque licet which is all they can do (after the royal prohibition).

204. Cynthi of Cynthus; a mountain in Delos, sacred to Apollo and Diana. Hence they are often called Cynthius and Cynthia,

- 206. Vobis creatis = proud of having borne you. Gr. 431. A. & S. 257. - 208. Sim. Gr. 525. A. & S. 265. — 209. Nati. Gr. 439. 2. 1). A. & S. 205, R. 2 (1). — 211. Tantalis=the daughter of Tantalus. — 212. Quod=which (childlessness). Recidat. Gr. 488. I. A. & S. 260, R. 6. For the long antepenult, see Gr. 669. V. A. & S. 307. 2 (1). 213. Paternam. See on v. 172. 217 Tecti. See on v. 209. Cadmeida. See on v. 177. — 219. Assiduis. Gr. 443. 2. A. & S. 205, R. 15 (a). 221. Genitis. See on V. 538. Amphione. See on Tiresia, v. 157. — 222. Tyrio suco = with the Tyrian juice; a purple dye, for which the Tyrians were famous, obtained from a shell-fish. 224. Qui - fuerat : who had been the first-born of his mother. - 227. Mihi. Gr. 389. 2. 2). A. & S. 228. 3. 228. Frenis. Gr. 431. A. & S. 257. Manu. Gr. 422. 2. A. & S. 255, R. 3 (6). — 230. Inane. See on IV. 621. Sonitu. See on v. 206. So nube,, v. 232. — 232. Rector; sc. navis. 233. Effluat. Gr. 491. A. & S. 262, R. 5. 235. Summa. See on IV. 659. Cervice. Gr. 422. 1. 2). A. & S. 254, R. 3. — 237. Ut - pronus =as he was bent forward. Per

admissa = along (or over) the swift neck; i. e, the neck of the swift horse. - 241. Nitidae; because the bodies of the wrestlers were anointed with oil. -246. Solo. See on cervice, v. 235. – 247, A spondaic line. Gr. 672. 3. A. & S. 310. I and R. 1. — 248. Laniata; " by anticipation." See on IV. 729. 250. Delius = Apollo; from his native Delos. Illi. Gr. 398. 5. A. & S. 211, R. 5 (1). — 252. Simul=simul ac. Hamis the barbed point. Cf.

[ocr errors]

arrow.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

V. 384. - 254. Non modifies simplex. Damasichthona=Damasichthon. Gr. 93. A. & S. 80. I. - 255. Qua - poples; i. e. just below the knee. 258. Pennis - the feathered part of the

Tenus. Gr. 602. II. A. & S. 241, R. I. - - 261. Precando. Gr. 566. I. A. & S. 275, R. 4. – 262. Dique ... dixerat = et dixerat: Di, etc. — 263. Ignarus — rogandos = ignorant that not all need be propitiated. Gr. 229; 552. 3. A. & S. 162. 15; 270, R. I (a). — 265. Arcitenens Apollo, the bearer of the bow. Cf. Virg. A. III. 75.

268. Certam fecere; in prose, certiorem fecerunt. — 269. Mirantem – superi=wondering that the gods could, angry that they had dared, do this. Gr. 558. V. 1 and 2. A. & S. 273. 5 (3) and N. 7. — 270. Haberent. Gr. 527. A. & S. 266. 1. — 272. Luce: vita. 274. Latois = of Latona. - 275. Resupina=alta, v. 169. -276. Invidiosa = envied. Cf. this passive or objective use of the word with the active or subjective, V. 513. Hosti. Gr. 388. I. A. & S. 225. III. - 277. Corporibus. Gr. 386. A. & S. 224. Ordine. Gr. 414. 3. A. & S. 247. 2. - 279. Liventia = livid ; from beating. Cf. v. 248. — 280. Dolore. Gr. 414. 4. A. & S. 247. 3. -281. This line is probably spurious. — 283. Efferor = I am carried to my grave; I die in the death of my children. — 284. Miserae mihi to me even in my wretchedness. See on corporibus, v. 277. So fratri, v. 291. — 285. Quoque

- 289. Demisso crine; in token of grief. —291. Ore. Gr. 431. A. & S. 257.294. Oraque — pressit = did not close her mouth (even in death). Sibi. Gr. 385. 4. A. & S. 224, R. 1. Exit=exiit. Cf. I. 200. — 296. Videres. Gr. 486 and 4. A. & S. 260. II. and R. 2. — 299. Minimam; sc. natu. 303. Diriguit she became rigid ; i. e. petrified. Malis. Gr. 414. 2. A. & S. 247. I.

-305. Nihil vivum there is nothing of life in her appearance. — 307. Congelat= becomes stone. - 308. Reddere gestus = to move. 311. Patriam. See on v. 149. Montis; i. e. Sipylus. — 312. Lacrimas. Gr. 371. 3. A. & S. 232 (2).

.

even.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

METAMORPHOSES. BOOK VIII.

THE STORY OF DAEDALUS AND ICARUS. (vv. 183 235.)

Daedalus was an Athenian, distinguished for his skill in sculpture and architecture. Being condemned to death for the murder of his nephew Perdix, he fled with his son Icarus to Crete, where he was protected by king Minos, and, among other works, constructed the

famous labyrinth. After a time, he incurred the displeasure of the king, who imprisoned him. How he escaped is told in the story here given. — Cf. Virg. A. VI. 14-33, and Hor. C. I. 3. 34; II. 20. 13; IV. 2. 2.

184. Exilium; i. e. his absence from his native Athens. — 186. Obstruat; sc. Minos. Gr. 515. I. A. & S. 263. 2 (1). — 187. Omnia possideat: even if he possesses everything else.

Gr. 503. I.

A. & S. 260, R. 3. — 189. Naturamque novat=he renews nature ; imposes new laws upon nature. - 190. Longam sequente = =a shorter following a longer one. As he begins with the smallest, it would seem more natural to say brevem longiore. – 191. Ut-putes so that you may (would) think that they have (had) grown by regular ascent. Gr. 494. A. & S. 262 and R. I. 192. Avenis. The shepherd's pipe was made of reeds or straws of unequal length, joined together with wax. Cf. Virg. E. I. 2 ; III. 25 ; V. 2, etc. — 193. Medias et ... imas the middles and the ends (of the feathers). Gr. 441. 6. A. & S. 205, R. 17. — 195. Imitetur. Gr. 491. A. & S. 262. 196. Tractare. Gr. 552. 3. A. & S. 270, R. I. Pericla; the effect for the cause. Gr. 705. II. A. & S. 324. 2. - 199. Mollibat.

Gr. 239. I.

A. & S. 162. 2. 200. Manus ultima the last touch. 203. Medio. See on v. 193. Curras. Gr. 492. 2. A. & S. 262. So gravet and adurat.

204. Demissior. Gr. 443. 2. A. & S. 205, R. 15. So celsior. - 206. Inter utrumque = between the two (extremes). Spectare. Gr. 551. II. 1. A. & S. 273. 2 (d). Booten. See on II. 176. 207, Helicen. See on II. 132, 171. Orionis of Orion, a prominent southern constellation. Cf. Virgil, A. I. 535 ; III. 517; IV. 52.

- 208. Me duce. Gr. 431. A. & S. 257, R. 7 (a) and (6). — 213. Ante. Gr. 436. A. & S. 235, R. 10. — 215. Sequi. Gr. 558. VI. 3. A. & S. 273. 2 and (6). Damnosas - perilous. — 217. Arundine. Cf. calamo, III. 587. — 218. Baculo. Gr. 419. II. A. & S. 245. II. 1. Pastor and arator are in apposition with aliquis. - 219. Possent. Gr. 501. I. A. & S. 264. I. - 220. Junonia; because it was the birthplace of Juno. Cf. Virg. A. I. 16. - 221. Delos. See on III. 597 and VI. 190. Paros was an island in the Aegean, one of the largest of the Cyclades. See on II. 264, and cf. Virg. A. III. 126. 222. Dextra is nominative with Lebynthos. Cf. III. 640. Lebynthus, or Lebinthus, and Calymne are small islands in the Aegean. Melle. Gr. 429. A. & S. 250. 1. — 223. Volatu. Gr. 414. 2. A. & S. 247. I (2). — 224. Cupidine. Gr. 414. 2. 3) (2). A. & S. 247, R. 2 (b). 225. Rapidi scorching. The word is derived from rapere, and originally is nearly=rapax. Hence it is applied to devouring seas and fires, and often, as here, to the sun. - 228. Remigio. Cf. remigio alarum, Virg. A. I. 301; VI. 19. — 230. The southeastern

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

part of the Aegean was called mare Icarium. -233. Dicebat. Gr. 469. II. A. & S. 145. II. 1. - 235. Tellus; i. e. the island Icarus, or Icaria (now Nicaria), in the Aegean, west of Samos. Sepulti; sc. Icari.

THE STORY OF PHILEMON AND BAUCIS. [vv. 619 726.)

Pirithous, the son of Ixion, had refused to believe that the gods could change the forms of men ; whereupon Lelex, king of the Locri, relates the following story as one for the truth of which he can vouch.

621. Dubites. Gr. 489. I. and 499. A. & S. 262 and R. 9. 623. Pelopeia. Pelops was driven out of Phrygia by Ilus, and fled to Greece. Pittheus was one of the sons of Pelops. — 624. Parenti. Gr. 388. 3. A. & S. 225. II. - 626. Celebres =abounding in, frequented by. Cf. VI, 165. — 628. Atlantiades Mercury, whose mother, Maia, was the daughter of Atlas. Cf. Virg. A. IV. 258, and Ilor. C. I. 1o. I. Caducifer. For a description of the caduceus, or wand, of Mercury, see Virg. A. IV. 242-246. Alis. Gr. 431. A. & S. 257. — 629. Locum=shelter, lodging. - 632. Aetate. Gr. 428. A. & S. 211, R. 6. - 633. Juncti united (in marriage). Annis.

Gr. 426.
A. & S. 253.

634. Fatendo. Gr. 566. I. A. & S. 275, R. 4. - 635. Nec — ferendam=and not intolerable. — 636. Nec refert=nor matters it. Gr. 408. 2. A. & S. 219, R. 4. Requiras. Gr. 525 and 526. II. 2. A. & S. 265, and R. 2. -637. Tota sunt. Cf. I. 355. Idem. Gr. p. 61, foot-note, and 669. II. A. & S. 306, R. 1 (1). — 638. Penates. See on I. 174. — 639. Submissoque - postes =and with bent head (i.e. stooping) entered the lowly door. 641. Quo which. Textum stragulum. — 642. Inde - hesternos then she raked open the warm embers on the hearth, and kindles up the remnants of yesterday's fire. — 644. Et ranili=and blew it into a flame with her aged (feeble) breath. — 646. Minuit - broke them. - 648. Foliis. Gr. 425. 2. 2).

A. & S. 251.

Levat = takes down. 649. Sordida suis = a dingy flitch of bacon ; sordida, because hanging in the smoke, which blackens the beam also. Tigno. Gr. 422. 2. A. & S. 255, R. 3 (6). So clavo, v. 654. — 651. Domat=mollit ; i. e. boils it. - 652. Medias — horas = they beguile the intervening hours with conversation. — 654. Clavo ... ab ansa= from a nail by the handle. -- 655. Fovendos. Gr. 565. 3. 2). A. & S. 274, R. 7 (a). — 657. Sponda – salignis. Gr. 428. A. & S. 211, R. 6. — 659. Et=even. — - 660. Non indignanda

not to be scorned by; i.e. not out of keeping with. Lecto is personified. Gr. 388. I. A. & S. 225. III. — 662. In the Augustan age, three-footed tables belong to the furniture of the poor. — 665.

on

[ocr errors]

a

« ZurückWeiter »