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the infernal regions delay (to yield to your power)? Tuum. Gr. 398. 3. A. & S. 211, R. 3 (6). - 372. Profers = extend. Agitur = is at stake. 373. Quae - est * such is now our tameness. Gr. 453. 4. A. & S. 206 (18). < 374. Mecum=meis cum viribus = as mine is. — 375. Pallas and Diana had made vows of perpetual virginity. — 376. Abscessisse mihi = have withdrawn from me. Gr. 385. 4. A. & S. 224, R. 1 (a). Filia = Proserpina. Virgo. Gr. 362. A. & S. 210. -377. Erit=manebit. Nam easdem for she cherishes the same hopes ; i. e. as Pallas and Diana. — 378. Pro

-regno=if you have any regard for our common kingdom. On tibi, see Gr. 387. 4. & S. 226. — 379. Patruo= to her uncle, Pluto. Proserpina was the daughter of Jupiter. 380. Solvit opens. Arbitrio. Gr. 414. 2. A. & S. 249. II. – 381. Sed (one only) but (the sharpest). Qua. Gr. 417. A. & S. 256. 2. — 382. Nec minus arcum =nor surer, nor more obedient to the bow. On audiat, see Gr. 501. I. A. & S. 264.7. - 383. Cornum ; second decl. neut. — 384. Hamata ... arundine with the barbed

Ditem= Dis, a name of Pluto. 385. Hennaeis moenibus the city Henna, or Enna, in the centre of Sicily, famous for a temple of Ceres. — 386. Aquae limits lacus. Nomine. Gr. 429. A. & S. 250. 1. Illo; sc. lacu. Gr. 417. A. & S. 256. 2. Caystros. See on II. 253. — 389. Ut velo =

=as with an awning, or canopy. Phoebeos . . ignes the rays

of the sun. - 391. Luco. Gr. 422. 1. 2). A. & S. 254, R. 3. — 393. Studio. Gr. 414. 3. A. & S. 247. 2.

- 394. Aequales =her companions. Legendo=in gathering (the flowers). Gr. 566. I. A. & S. 275, R. 4. 395. Diti. Gr. 388. 4. A. & S. 225. II. - 396. Usque amor = so impatient is his love. 397. Matrem. Gr. 371. 3. A. & S. 232 (2). — 398. Summa ... ab

= from the upper border. — 400. Annis. Gr. 386. A. & S. 224. - 401. Virgineum. Gr. 398. 2. A. & S. 211, R. 4 (a). — 402. Nomine. Gr. 414. 3. A. & S. 247. 2. — 404. Ferrugine. Everything in the lower world was represented as of a dark color. Cf. v. 360, and Virg. A. VI. 303. – 406. Palicorum of the Palici; Sicilian gods, twin sons of Jupiter (some say of Vulcan), worshipped near the city Palice, where were the lake and sulphurous springs here alluded to. Ferventia=boiling forth. Terra. Gr. 431. A. & S. 257. - 407. Bacchiadae; the descendants of Bacchis, king of Corinth. Having been banished from that city, a part of them took refuge in Sicily, where they founded Syracuse. Bimari; so called because situated on the isthmus between the Corinthian and Saronic gulfs. Cf. Hor. C. I. 7. 2. Corintho. Gr. 425. 3. 1). A. & S. 246. - 408. Portus. Syracuse had two harbors, the Portus Magnus, still called Porto Maggiore, and the Portus Minor, or Laccius. — 409.

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Medium. This adjective may take a partitive genitive plural, or, as here, two genitives singular, equivalent to a plural; midway of (the two places) Cyane and Arethusa. These are two fountains near Syracuse. On Pisaeae, see v. 493 foll. The final syllable of the word is not elided. — 410. Quod - cornibus = which flows in a narrow channel, shut in by close promontories ; referring to the strait between Sicily and Ortygia, a small island on which Syracuse was partly built. -413. Gurgite. Gr. 434. 1. A. & S. 242. Summa. See on IV. 659. Alvo. Gr. 47. 2. 2). A. & S. 49. 1. — 414. Deam

- Proserpina. Nec — inquit = et inquit, Non longius ibitis.. 415. Roganda = she should have been asked for; i. e. of her mother. Gr. 229. A. & S. 162. 15. - 416. Magnis. Gr. 386. 1. A. & S. 224. — 417. Anapis; the god of the Anapis, a river near Syracuse. — 418. Exorata wooed. Exterrita = frightened (into yielding to his suit). — 420. Saturnius = Pluto, as the son of Saturn, - 421. In ima=into the depths of the spring; i. e. of Cyane. Gr. 396. III. 2. 3 (3). A. & S. 205, R. 9, and 212, R. 3.

Contortum. Gr. 579. A. & S. 274. 3 (6). — 424. Medio cratere=in the midst of the chasm ; i.e. the opening made by the stroke of the sceptre. — 429. Extenuatur is dissolved, melts away. Videres. Gr. 485. A. & S. 260. II. R. 2. -430. Pati flexus = become flexible. Posuisse. Gr. 542. 2. A. & S. 268,

-431. De tota (sc. illa) =of her whole body. Tenuissima quaeque whatever was most slender. -432. Crines, etc. are in apposition with quaeque. -- 433. Membris. Gr. 387. A. & S. 226. Exilibus=slender. See on v. 431. – 435. Abeunt. See on IV. 658. —436. Vitiatas; i.e. having lost their natural constitution. 437. Possis. Gr. 501. I. A. & S. 264. 7.

438. Matri. Gr. 388. 4. A. & S. 225. II. — 439. Profundo; sc. mari. Cf. II. 267. Gr. 422. 1. 2). A. & S. 254, R. 3. So terris. - 440. U dis; because rising from the sea. 441. Hesperus the evening star. - 442. Pinus torches of pine. — 444. Hebetarat=had dimmed. — 446. Sitim. Gr. 85. A. & S. 79. 2. Ora... colluerant=had wet her lips. — 450. Dulce; used as a noun= dulcem potem. Polenta. Gr. 414 4. A. & S. 247. 3.

451. Oris. Gr. 396. IV. A. & S. 211, R. 6. -453. Neque adhuc et nondum. Parte. Gr. 431. A. & S. 257. — 457. Ne sit (sc. ei)

that he may not have. Gr. 491. A. & S. 262. Nocendi. Gr. 563. A. & S. 275. III. R. I and (1). 458. Lacerta. Gr. 417. A. & S. 256. 2. — 461. Nomen; i. e. stellio, which the poet derives from stella. Corpora. Gr. 380. A. & S. 234. II. Guttis=spots.

462. Erraverit. Gr. 525. A. & S. 265. — 463. Mora. See on I. 214. Quaerenti - orbis :

=no part of the world remained for her to search. Gr. 386. 2. A. & S. 224, R. 1. - 464. Eundo. Gr.

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566. I. A. & S. 275, R. 4. — 465. Fuisset. Gr. 510 and 1. A. & S. 261. 1. — 466, 467. Volenti (sc. er) is equivalent to a dative of pessessor, aderant being used for erant. Quo loqueretur=the means of speaking. Gr. 501. I. A. & S. 264. 7. — 469. In=into. A. & S. 235 (2), R. 4. 470. Persephones is the Greek form for Proserpinae. Summis. See on IV. 659. — 471. Simul=simul

Tanquam-scisset = as if she then at length had discovered that her daughter had been carried off. Gr. 503. II. and 506. A. & S. 263. 2 (1). — 473. Repetita = repeatedly. See on IV. 734. — 474. Sit. Gr. 525. A. & S. 265. — 475. Munere. See on v. 345, and cf. vv..342, 343. - 477. Reperit. See on repulit, II. 157. Vertentia= (used for) turning. - 479. Leto = destruction. - 480. Fallere depositum=to betray their trust ; i. e. the seed

Gr. 551. II. 1. A. & S. 273. 2 (a) and 272, R. 6. Vitiata. See on v. 436. — 481. Terrae=Sicily; which was famous for its fertility, in ancient times. —482. Cassa jacet = lies useless ; i. e. avails nothing. Primis in herbis; i. e. as soon as they spring up. - 484. Sideraque. The final e is lengthened by the arsis. Gr. 660. A. & S. 308. — 485. Jacta = that have been sown. Fatigant=exhaust, hinder the growth of. — 486. Gramen is in the same construction as lolium and tribuli. — 487. Alpheias = Arethusa ; a nymph of Elis, beloved by the river-god Alpheus, and changed by Diana into a fountain, that she might escape him. But he still pursued her; and when she fled under the sea to Ortygia, he followed her, and rose with her on that island. Hence it was said that a cup thrown into the Alpheus would appear again in the fountain of Arethusa in Ortygia. — 489. Virginis is in the same construction as frugum. — 491. Terrae. Gr. 385. A. & S. 223, R. 2.

- 492. Nihil; i. e. no punishment. Rapinae. Gr. 384. I. A. & S. 223.

Cf. v. 419 foll. — 494. Such transition from the singular to the plural is sometimes found even in prose. Cf. v. 504. — 496. Solo. Gr. 417. A. & S. 256. 2. Arethusa is in apposition with the subject of habeo. Penates. See on 1. 174. — 498. Motasim = why I have been driven from my native land. Gr. 525. A. & S. 265. — 499. Ortygiam. Gr. 379. 3. 2). A. & S. 237, R. 5 (6) and (c). Narratibus. Gr. 391. 1. A. & S. 222, R. I. - 500. Curis. que. Gr. 425. A. & S. 251. - 501. Vultus. Gr. 402. III. A. & S. Melioris =more cheerful. Pervia tellus.

See on V. 487. — 504. Stygio = Stygian ; i. e. beneath the earth, near the infernal world. Labor = I flow. — 506. Vultu. Gr. 429. A. & S. 250. I.

507. Maxima=domina. 509. Ceu saxea=as if petrified. — 510. Attonitae=one thunderstruck. Gr. 391. 1 and 2. 4) (2). A. & S. 222, R. I and R. 2 (6). Utque - amentia = and when her deep stupor was banished

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by deep grief. — 512. Vultu. See on v. 506. — 513. Invidiosa is used in an active sense = - indignant; full of wrath against Pluto. 515. Matris ; objective genitive. Gr. 396. II. A. & S. 211, R. 2. So illius. — 516. Moveat. Gr. 488. I. and A. & S, 260, R. 6. So sit. Neu - partu = and do not, I pray, have less regard for her, because I am her mother. – 518. Mihi. Gr. 388. 4.

A. & S. 225. II. — 519, 520. Si — certius - if you call it finding to lose more certainly. Gr. 373 ; 550. A. & S. 230 and N. 3. So scire and the second reperire. On sit, see Gr. 525. A. & S. 265. · Rapta;

Gr. 558. V. 2. A. & S. 273. 5, R. (3) and N. 6. — 521. Reddat. Gr. 505. A. & S. 263. 2 (1). Praedone.

See on V. 345. Marito. Gr. 363. A. & S. 204 and R. 1 (a). The idea is : if my daughter does not deserve such a fate, surely your daughter does not. — 524. Mihi. Gr. 391. I. A. & S. 221, R. 1. Si — placet (sc. tibi, or nobis) if you will only call things by their right

- 525. Injuria. Gr. 362. A. & S. 210. So amor. 526. Nobis ... pudori:

=a disgrace to us. Gr. 390. 1. I). A. & S. 227. – 527. Tu modo velis =if you will but consent to it; i. e. the marriage. See on reddat, v. 521. Ut-cetera=were there nothing else in his favor. Gr. 516. II. and 1. A. & S. 262, R. 2. 528. Esse. Gr. 549. A. & S. 269 (6) and R. 2. Quid – desunt =but (or, nay) other things are not wanting. Quid quod often introduces a new and striking fact, when the literal translation would perhaps be: what would you say to the fact that ? but the idea may often be more simply expressed by nay.Key's Lat. Gram. § 1454. h. -529. Sorte. See on v. 368. - 530. Discidii=of their separation, or divorce. Repetet. See on reddat, v. 521. - 531. Lege condition. Gr. 414. 2. A. & S. 249. II. — 532. Nam - est so it is enjoined by a decree of the Fates. Not even Jupiter could change the decrees of the Fates. See on I. 256. — 533. At- est = but Ceres is resolved : a construction like Gr. 388. II. A. & S.

Educere. Gr. 549 and 1. A. & S. 269 and R. 2. 535. Simplex ; i. e. with no idea of the danger. – 536. Puniceum ... pomum a pomegranate. -537, Pallenti ... cortice

its golden rind. Grana - the "grains " from which the fruit takes its name, pomum granatum. 538. Ex omnibus. Gr. 398. 4. 2). A. & S. 212, R. 2, N. 4. So inter Nymphas. — 540. Avernales

infernal ; from the pestilential lake Avernus, in Campania, which was supposed to be an entrance to the lower world. Cf. Virg. A. VI. 106, 126, 201, etc. - 541. Acheronte Acheron ; one of the rivers of the infernal regions, here spoken of as a god, the father of Ascalaphus. Gr.425 and 1. A. & S. 246, R. 2. Furvis. See on v.404. 542. Reditum (sc. Proserpinae). ademit=prevented her return. 543. Profanam unhallowed, ill-omened. Some read profanum.

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1. 470.

- 544. Phlegethontide of Phlegethon, another of the infernal rivers. - 546. Sibi ablatus = taken away from himself ; i. e. losing his own form. Gr. 385. 4. A. & S. 224, R. 2. - 547. Inque - ungues =his head becomes dis ortionately large, and his nails are bent into long claws. Both nouns depend on in. 548. Per= by means of. Some translate it “on” or “all over.” — 549. Cf. Virg. A. IV. 462. - 552. Vobis; sc. sunt. Gr. 387. A. & S. 226. Acheloides=the Sirens, daughters of Achelous. Geratis. Gr. 518. I. A. & S. 263. 5 and R. I. - 554. Legeret. Gr. 518. 1.

A. & S. 263, R. 2. — 555. In is rarely found with mixtus, which generally takes the ablative with or without cum, or the dative. Cf. Virg. A. V.

- 557. Curam solicitude ; i. e. in behalf of Proserpina. - 559. Facilesque - habuistis =and found the gods favorable (to your prayers). — 561. Canor. The songs of the Sirens charmed all who heard them. Mulcendas. Gr. 562 ; 565. I. A. & S. 275. II. and R. 3. — 562. Deperderet. Gr. 491. A. & S. 262. — 563. Remansit. Gr. 463. I. A. & S. 209, R. 12 (3). — 564. Medius mediator between. See on v. 409. – 565. Ex aequo= aequaliter. Volventem (sc. se) revolving. — 568. Facies – oris = both her feelings and her looks. — 569. Diti quoque

=even to Pluto; who was the most gloomy of gods. — 570. Ut Sol = as the sun (is joyful).

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METAMORPHOSES. BOOK VI.

THE STORY OF NIOBE. - Niobe was the daughter of Tantalus and Dione, one of the Hyades. [See on III. 595.] She married Amphion, king of Thebes, and had seven sons and seven daughters, of whom she became so proud as to think herself superior to Latona and her two children, Apollo and Diana. How she was punished for her insolence the poet here tells us.

146. Lydia was a district of Asia Minor, in the middle of the western side of the peninsula. Fremit=shudders ; i. e. at the punishment of Arachne, who had boasted that she could surpass Minerva in weaving, and had been changed by the goddess into a spider. Phrygia lay to the east of Lydia. — 148. Ante — illam=before her own marriage Niobe had known her ; i. e. Arachne. — 149. Maeoniam Maeonia, the ancient name of Lydia. Sipylus was a mountain of Lydia, and the ancient capital of Maeonia is said to have had the same name. — 150. Popularis = her countrywoman. -151. Cedere. Gr. 552. 2. A. & S. 273. 2, N. 4 (a) and (6). So

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