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THAT EVERY OBJECT HE CONTEMPLATED AT WINDSOR REMINDING HIM OF HIS PAST HAPPINESS,

INCREASED HIS PRESENT SORROW.

When Windsor walls sustain'd my wearied arm;
My hand my chin, to ease my restless head;
The pleasant plot revested green with warm;
The blossom’d boughs with lusty ver yspread ; ;
The flower'd meads, the wedded birds so late
Mine eyes discover; and to my mind resort
The jolly woes, the hateless short debate,
The rakehell" life that longs to love’s disport.
Wherewith, alas ! the heavy charge of care
Heap'd in my breast, breaks forth against my will
In smoky sighs that overcast the air.
My vapour'd eye such dreary tears distil,
The tender green they quicken where they fall; ,
And I half bend to throw me down withal.

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Careless.-- Rakil, or rakle, seems synonymous with reckless.

LORD VAUX.

It is now universally admitted that Lord Vaux, the poet, was not Nicholas the first peer, but Thomas, the second baron of that name. He was one of those who attended Cardinal Wolsey on his embassy to Francis the First. He received the order of the Bath at the coronation of Anne Boleyn, and was for some time Captain of the island of Jersey. A considerable number of his pieces are found in the Paradise of Dainty Devices. Mr. Park' has noticed a passage in the prose prologue to Sackville's Introduction to the Mirror for Magistrates, that Lord Vaux had undertaken to complete the history of King Edward's two sons who were murdered in the Tower, but that it does not appear he ever executed his intention.

UPON HIS WHITE HAIRS.

FROM THE AGED LOVER'S RENUNCIATION OF LOVE.

* * * * * : *
These hairs of age are messengers
Which bid me fast repent and pray ;
They be of death the harbingers,
That doth prepare and dress the way:

Royal and Noble Authors.

Wherefore I joy that you may see
Upon my head such hairs to be..

They be the lines that lead the length
How far my race was for to run;
They say my youth is fled with strength,
And how old age is well begun;
The which I feel, and you may see
Such lines upon my head to be. :

They be the strings of sober sound,
Whose music is harmonical;
Their tunes declare a time from ground
I came, and how thereto I shall :
Wherefore I love that you may see
Upon my head such hairs to be.

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God grant to those that white hairs have,
No worse them take than I have meant ;
That after they be laid in grave,
Their souls may joy their lives well spent
God grant, likewise, that you may see
Upon my head such hairs to be,

VOL, I.

RICHARD EDWARDS

Was a principal contributor to the Paradise of Dainty Devices, and one of our earliest dramatic authors. He wrote two comedies, one entitled Damon and Pythias, the other Palamon and Arcite, both of which were acted before Queen Elizabeth. Besides his regular dramas he appears to have contrived masques, and to have written verses for pageants; and is described as having been the first fiddle, the most fashionable sonneteer, and the most facetious mimic of the Court. In the beginning of Elizabeth's reign he was one of the gentlemen of her chapel, and master of the children there, having the character of an excellent musician. His please ing little poem, the Amantium iræ, has been so often

reprinted, that, for the sake of variety, I have se· lected another specimen of his simplicity.

HE REQUESTETH SOME FRIENDLY COMFORT,

AFFIRMING HIS CONSTANCY.

The mountains high, whose lofty tops do meet the

haughty sky; The craggy rock, that to the sea free passage doth

deny;

The aged oak, that doth resist the force of blustring

blast; The pleasant herb, that every where a pleasant smell

doth cast; The lion's force, whose courage stout declares a

prince-like might; The eagle, that for worthiness is born of kings in

fight.

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Then these, I say, and thousands more, by tract of

time decay, And, like to time, do quite consume, and fade from

form to clay; But my true heart and service vow'd shall last time

out of mind, And still remain as thine by doom, as Cupid hath

assigned; My faith, lo here! I vow to thee, my troth thou

know'st too well ; My goods, my friends, my life, is thine; what need

I more to tell? I am not mine, but thine; I vow thy hests I will

obey, And serve thee as a servant ought, in pleasing if I

may; And sith I have no flying wings, to serve thee as I

wish, Ne fins to cut the silver streams, as doth the gliding fish;

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