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& Quædam (natarum) some of them, (videntur) vehi pisce

seemed to be carried on a fish. h Qualem decet (faciem sororum) esse, such as it becomes the

face of sisters to be. i Clymeneia proles the offspring of Clymene. a Hirsuta canos capillos with her shaggy hoary hair. Capillos

ace. after hirsuta. Accusativus aliquando.b Inde medius loco, Sol, oculis quibus aspicit omnia, vidit juve

nem paventem novitate rerum, trembling at the strangeness

of the things (which he saw.) © Haud inficianda parenti, by no means to be disowned by

your parent. Inficior, dep. Parenti dat. after the part.

in dus. Participia passivæ vocis.d Culpam her offence, her want of chastity. e Ut feras, you may enjoy, illud, me tribuente. i Dis juranda palus let the marsh to be sworn upon by the

Gods. The river Styx, was the most awful name that the gods could use in swearing. Dis for diis. Syna.

resis est duarum." & Desierat for desiverat, had ceased. Desino. h Vox mea facta est temeraria (voce) tuâ. i Placeat sibi quisque licebit, it will be lawful (ut) that

every one please himself. a Eget moderamine certo requires a steady management. b Nitor in adversum, I strive against opposition. In the

age of Ovid, that system of Astronomy, which was afterwards called the Ptolomean, prevailed; by which they were taught that the earth was in the centre of the universe, and that the sun, planets, and fixed stars moved round it. The sun, therefore, had the appear. ance of moving through the Zodiac, in a way contrary to that of the earth. This will explain the sentiments

expressed in the following lines.c The sign Sagittarius. Hæmonius, Thessalian, because

the Archer was represented in the form of a Centaur,

whose nation was Thessaly. * Nec tibi est in promptu nor have you the power, regere

quadrupedes, &c. e Timendo in fear. Gerund in do. a Posceque aliquid (bonum) e tot et tantis bonis cæli, terræque,

marisque.

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b

b Radiorum of the spokes.
Gemmæ positæ per juga, exque ordine reddebant clara lumina
Phæbo repercusso, the gems placed on the yokes (of the
horses) and in (beautiful) order returned a brilliant light
(Phæbo') to the reflected sun.
Lucifer the morning star. The planet Venus called
Lucifer when a morning star, and Hesperus when an

evening star.
e Cornua the horns or cusps.
f Titan nom. sing. construed with the preceding pater.

Puter Titan his father Titan: a name of Phoebus.
6 Parce stimulis spare the whip.
a Summum per æthera through the highest part of heaven.

Melire imper. of molior to urge.
Anguem the snake, or dragon; a constellation north of

the ecliptic.
c Arum the altar, south of the ecliptic.
d Qua, opto, juvet, et consulat tibi melius quam tu, who, I

hope, may assist you, and consult your safety, better

than you do yourself. e Hesperio in littore in the Spanish shore. To those who

lived in Italy, the sun appeared to set in Spain, thence called Hesperus; as Italy was, for the same reason, by

the Greeks." f Sine me permit me, imper. of sino. & And rejoices to hold the reigns entrusted to his hands. a Sic currus dat sultus, vacuos onere assueta, in aera, thus

the chariot gives a spring, unencumbered with its
wonted weight, into the air, and is shaken aloft, and is
as if it were empty: similis (currui) inani. Some copies

read vacuus, which then agrees with currus.
b Commissas which had been entrusted (sibi) to him.
c Triones. See 23, a.

Serpensque quæ posita est proxima, &c. The Poet, by
representing Phaeton as driving out of the ecliptic to
the north, describes the effects of his course, on those

constellations and countries situated in a colder climate. e Boote voc. of Bootes. f Valuisse rogundo that he had prevailed or succeeded in

asking. Valeo. Rogando gerund in do of rogo. & Modo prospicit occasus he only sees the west.

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h Scorpios, nom. sing.
a Mentis inops destitute of courage.
b Ut quæque altissima as every thing else also that was

highest.
c Nondum Æagrius not yet belonging to Æager, who was

born in later times, and was king of Thessaly. d Niribus caritura about to lose its spow, with which the

tops of mountains are covered. a Then they (men) believe that the nation of the Æthio

pians, the blood being called (or drawn) into the surface

of their bodies, contracted a black colour. b Arsurusque iterum about to burn again. Homer relates.

that Vulcan, assisting Achilles in passing the Xanthus,

set fire to the streams. c Aurumque quod Tagus vehit amne suo, fluit ignibus. d Flumineæ volucres the river fowls, the swans which fre,

quented the river Cayster. a Ima (Aumina) the bottom of the streams. b Liceat let it be permitted, perituræ me about to perish

viribus by the violence ignis of the fire. c Tantum so much. d Fac me meruisse grant that I have deserved. a Consule summe rerum consult the sum of affairs, the antho.

rity of the fates, the destiny of the world. Propiorą manibus nearer the shades. C Saltu facto in contraria making a leap into opposite sidesa

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[blocks in formation]

19

18 17

15

1 Calendæ. Calendæ. Calendæ. Calendæ.
2 6

4
4

4 3 5

3
3

3 4 4

pridie nonas. pridie nonas. pridie nonas. 5 3

nonæ.
nonæ.

nona. 6 pridie nonas. 8

8 7 nonæ.

7
7

7 8 8

6

6 9 7

5
5

5 10 6

4
4

4 11 5

3
3

3 12 4

pridie idus. pridie idus. pridie idus. 13 3

idus.
idus.

idus. 14 pridie idus.

16 15 idus. 18

15 16 17

17
16

14 17 16

16
15

13 18 15

14

12 19 14

14
13

11 20 13

13
12

10 21 12

12
11

9 22 11

11

10 23 10

10
9

7 24 9

9
8

6 25 8

8
7

5 26 7

7
6

4 27 6

6
5

3 28 5

4

pridie cal. 29 4

3 30 3

3

pridie cal. 31 pridie cal. pridie cal.

Obs. The use of this table is obvious. With respect to the Calends which begin every month, see 15, f. Here the Ilth of, or more properly, before the Calends of May, must be sought for under the April column, and the 21 in the 1 column, being opposite to the 11, shows that the xi Kal. Maias answers to our 21st of April.

Every leap year, in which February has 29 days, both the 24th and 25th of that month are written sexto ante cal. Martias ; hence that year is named bissextile.

In the CALENDAR the first column represents the order of the days according to our computation; and the figure to the right hand shews the day in each month by the Roman reckoning. Thus the 4th of June is the day before the Nones of that month; and the 19th of August is the 14th day before the calends of September. So the Ides of March are our 15th of that month; and the Nones of December are the same as the 5th of December with us.

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A VOCABULARY:

ADAPTED TO THE

COLLECTANEA LATINA.

BY

THOMAS QUIN.

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