Sharpe's London magazine, a journal of entertainment and instruction. [entitled] Sharpe's London journal. [entitled] Sharpe's London magazine, conducted by mrs. S.C. Hall, Bände 5-6

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Anna Maria Hall
1848
 

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Seite 110 - And Jacob rose up early in the morning, and took the stone that he had put for his pillows, and set it up for a pillar, and poured oil upon the top of it.
Seite 44 - And he took butter, and milk, and the calf which he had dressed, and set it before them; and he stood by them under the tree, and they did eat.
Seite 135 - ... Say unto thy brethren, This do ye; lade your beasts, and go, get you unto the land of Canaan; and take your father and your households, and come unto me: and I will give you the good of the land of Egypt, and ye shall eat the fat of the land.
Seite 68 - And it came to pass, as the camels had done drinking, that the man took a golden earring of half a shekel weight, and two bracelets for her hands of ten shekels weight of gold; and said, Whose daughter art thou?
Seite 142 - Heap on more wood ! — the wind is chill, But let it whistle as it will, We'll keep our Christmas merry still.
Seite 109 - And he lighted upon a certain place, and tarried there all night because the sun was set ; and he took of the stones of that place, and put them for his pillows, and lay down in that place to sleep.
Seite 115 - For take an example of a dog, and mark what a generosity and courage he will put on when he finds himself maintained by a man, who to him is instead of a God, or melior natura...
Seite 39 - These violent delights have violent ends, And in their triumph die : like fire and powder, Which as they kiss consume.
Seite 43 - AND the Lord appeared unto him in the plains of Mamre: and he sat in the tent door in the heat of the day ; and he lift up his eyes and looked, and, lo, three men stood by him: and when he saw them, he ran to meet them from the tent door, and bowed himself toward the ground...
Seite 11 - He carolled, light as lark at morn; No longer courted and caressed, High placed in hall, a welcome guest, He poured, to lord and lady gay, The unpremeditated lay: Old times were changed, old manners gone; A stranger filled the Stuarts' throne; The bigots of the iron time Had called his harmless art a crime.

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