Clinical Lectures on the Practice of Medicine, Band 1

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New Sydenham Society, 1884
 

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Seite 105 - He gives the following instance, amongst others, of the danger of traversing badly drained roads. A gentleman removed 90 sheep from a considerable distance to his own residence. On coming near to a bridge, which is thrown over the Barling's river, one of the drove fell into a ditch and fractured its leg. The shepherd immediately took it in his arms to a neighbouring house, and set the limb. During this time, which did not occupy more than one hour, the remainder were left to graze in the ditches...
Seite 99 - ... by bounteous harvests. Drainage, embankments, engines, and enclosures have given stability to the soil (which in its nature is as rich as the Delta of Egypt) as well as salubrity to the air. These very considerable improvements, though carried on at a great expense, have at last turned to a double account, both in reclaiming much ground and improving the rest, and in contributing to the healthiness of the inhabitants. Works of modern refinement have given a totally different face and character...
Seite 447 - Many of the sick died before reachmg the hospital ; and even their comrades, whilst bearing them from the outposts to medical aid, sank themselves, suddenly seized by the disorder. The natives, thinking their only safety lay in flight, had now begun to desert in great numbers ; and the highways and fields for many miles round were strewed with the bodies of those who had left the camp with the disease upon them, and speedily sank under its exhausting effects.
Seite 98 - ... prevalent diseases to be of a magnitude of which no conception had been formed at the commencement of the investigation. Its importance is manifested by the severe consequences of its neglect in every part of the country, as well as by its advantages in the increasing salubrity and productiveness...
Seite 583 - ... &c. But the extraordinary circumstance is, that of the offspring produced at one and the same birth, such as, like the mother, were entirely white, were, like her, invariably deaf; while those that had the least speck of colour on their fur, as invariably possessed the usual faculty of hearing.
Seite 579 - Now, here is another remarkable instance of paralysis creeping from the extremities towards the centre; here is a paralysis affecting all parts of the extremities as completely as if it Had its origin in the central parts of the nervous system, and can any one, with such palpable evidences before him, hesitate to believe, that paralysis, or even hemiplegia, without any lesion of the brain, or spinal cord, may arise from disease commencing and originating in the nervous extremities alone? I may observe,...
Seite 365 - ... accelerated by the system of depletion, although the heat of the skin suggested its employment. The derangement of the brain and nerves in this form depended on something more than the violence of the circulation, and originated in something altogether different from mere cerebral inflammation or congestion. What that something was...
Seite 345 - ... produced by spasm of the ducts leading from the liver and gall-bladder. It is well known to pathologists since the time of Broussais, that jaundice is as frequently produced by duodenitis as hepatitis, if not more so — but I do not think that the explanation he gives is applicable to our cases. He concludes that when the mucous surface of the duodenum is thrown into a state of excitement, we may have a consequent affection of the liver, for the duodenum bears the same relation to the liver...
Seite 103 - In the course of inquiries as to what have been the effects of land drainage upon health, one frequent piece of information received has been that the rural population had not observed the effects on their own health, but they had marked the effects of drainage on the health and improvement of the stock. Thus the less frequent losses of stock from epidemics are beginning to be perceived as accompanying the benefits of drainage in addition to those of increased vegetable production.
Seite 578 - ... sensations of pricking and severe pain in the integuments of the hands and feet, accompanied by so acute a degree of sensibility, that the patients could not bear these parts to be touched by the bedclothes. After some time, a few days, or even a few hours, a diminution or even abolition of sensation took place in the affected members, they became incapable of distinguishing the shape, texture, or temperature of bodies, the power of motion declined, and finally they were observed to become altogether...

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