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LUSIAD;

OR

THE DISCOVERY OF INDIA:

AN

EPIC POEM.

TRANSLATED FROM THE PORTUGUESE OF

LUIS DE CAMOENS,

WITH

AN HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION AND NOTES.

BY

WILLIAM JULIUS MICKLE.

a Dew Edition.
IN THREE VOLUMES.

VOL. III

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR
LACKINGTON, ALLEN, AND CO..

TEMPLE OF THE MUSES,

FINSBURY-SQUARE.

PO SLIC Libiary 4263971

ASTOR, LENOX AND TILDEN FOUNDATIONS

R 1929 L

THE

LUSIAD.

BOOK VII.

Hall

, glorious Chief! where never chief before Forced his bold way, all hail on India's shore! And hail, ye Lusian heroes! fair and wide What groves of palm, to haughty Rome deny'd, For you by Ganges' lengthening banks unfold! What laurel forests on the shores of gold For you

their honours ever verdant rear, Proud with their leaves to twine the Lusian spear!

Ah heaven! what fury Europe's sons controls! What self-consuming discord fires their souls! 'Gainst her own breast her sword Germania turns; Through all her states fraternal rancour burns;

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Some, blindly wandering, holy Faith disclaim*,
And fierce through all wild rages

civil flame.
High sound the titles of the English crown,
King of Jerusalemt, his old renown!
Alas, delighted with an airy name,
The thin dim shadow of departed fame,

* Some, blindly wandering, holy Faith disclaim—The constitution of Germany, observes Puffendorff, may be said to verify the fable of the Hydra, with this difference, that the heads of the German state bite and devour each other. At the time when Camoens wrote, the German empire was plunged into all the miseries of a religious war, the Catholics using every endeavour to rivet the chains of Popery, the adherents of Luther as strenuously endeavouring to shake them off. + High sound the titles of the English crown,

King of Jerusalem-This is a mistake. The title of King of Jerusalem was never assumed by the Kings of England. Robert, Duke of Normandy, son of William the Conqueror, was elected King of Jerusalem by the army in Syria, but declined it in hope of ascending the throne of England, which attempt was defeated.

Regnier, Count d'Anjou, father of Margaret, queen of Henry VI. was flattered with the mock royalty of Naples, Cyprus, and Jerusalem; his armorial bearing for the latter, Luna, a cross potent, between four crosses Sol.-Henry VIII. filled the throne of England when our author wrote this part of the Lusiad: his gothic luxury and conjugal brutality amply deserved the censure of the honest Poet.

England's stern Monarch, sunk in soft repose,
Luxurious riots mid his northern snows :
Or if the starting burst of rage succeed,
His brethren are his foes, and Christians bleed;
While Hagar's brutal race his titles stain,
In weeping Salem unmolested reign,
And with their rites impure her holy shrines profane.
And thou, O Gaul, with gaudy trophies plumed,
Most Christian named; alas, in vain assu!ned!
What impious lust of empire steels thy breast *
From their just Lords the Christian lands to wrest!
While Holy Faith's hereditary foes
Possess the treasures where Cynifio flowst;
And all secure, behold their harvests smile
In waving gold along the banks of Nile.

* What impious lust of empire steels thy breastThe French Translator very cordially agrees with the Portuguese Poet in the strictures upon Germany, England, and Italy. But when his own country is touched upon, Malgré l'estime, says he, que j'ai pour mon auteur, je ne craindrai pas de dire qu'il tombe ici dans une grande injustice. All Europe besides, however, will witness the truth of the assertion, which stigmatizes the French politics with the lust of extending their monarchy. to where Cynifio flows-A river in Africa.

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