Abbildungen der Seite
PDF

Of leading Trumps. 1. Lead trumps from a strong hand, but never from a weak one. By which means you will secure your good cards from being truinped.

2. Trump not out with a bad hand, although you hold five small trumps. For since your cards are bad, it is only trumping for the adversaries' good ones.

3. Having ace, king, knave, and three small trumps, play ace and king. For the probability of the Queen's falling is in your favour.

4. Having ace, king, knave, and one or two anall trumps, play the king, and wait the return from your partner to put on the knave. This method is in order to win the queen; but if you have particular reasons to wish the trumps out, play two rounds of trumps, and then your strong suit.

5. Having ace, king, and two or three small trumps, lead a small one. Inis method is with a view to let your partner win the first trick; but if you have good reason for getting out the trumps, play three rounds, or play ace and king, and then proceed with your strong

suit.

6. If your adversaries are cight, and you hold no hopour, throw off your best trump. For if your partner has not two honours, you have lost the game, and if he holds two honours, it is most advantageous for you to lead a trump.

7. Having ace, queen, knave, and small trumps, play the knave. For by this means only the king can make against you.

8. Having ace, queen, ten, and one or two small trumps, lead a small one. For it will give your partner a chance to win the trick, and keep the command in your own hand.

9. Having king, queen, ten, and small trumps, lead the king. Or if the king is lost, upon the return of trumps you may finesse the ten.

10. Having king, knave, ten, and small oner, lead the knave. Because it will prevent the adversaries from making a small trump.

11. Having queen, knave, nine, and smaller trumps, lead the queen. For if your partner holds the ace, you have a good chance of making the whole suit.

12. Having queen, knave, and two or three small

[ocr errors]

trumps, lead the queen. For if your partner holds the ace, you have a good chance for making the whole suit.

13. Having knave, ten, eight, and small trumps, lead the knave. For on the return of trumps vou probably may finesse the eight to advantage. • 14. Having knave, ten, and three small trumps, lead the knave. Because it will most distress your adversaries, unless two honours are beld on your right hand; the odds against which are about three to one.

15. Having only small trumps, begin with the highest. By this play you will support your partner all you can.

16. Having a sequence, begin with the highest. By this means your partner is best instructed how to play his hand, and cannot possibly be injured.

17. If an honour is turned up on your left, and the game much against you, lead a trump the first opportunity. For your game being desperately bad, this method is the most likely to retrieve it.

18. In all other cases it is dangerous leading through an honour, unless you are strong in trumps, or have a good hand. Because all the advantage of trumping through an honcur, lies in the finessing of your partner..

Suppose it proper to lead Trumps. 19. If an honour is turned up on your left, and you hold only one honour with a small trump, throw off the honour, and next the small one. Because it will greatly strengthen your partner's hand, and cannot hurt your own.

20. If an honour is turned up on the left, and you hold a sequence, lead the highest of it. Because it will prevent the last hand from injuring your partner. . 21. If a queen is turned up on the left, and you hol ace, king, and a small one, lead the small trump. Be. cause you will have a chance for getting the queen.

22. If a queen is turned up on your left, and you hold the knave, with small ones, lead the knave. For the knave can be of no service, since the queen is on your left.

23. If an honour is turned up by your partner, and you are strong in trumps, lead a small one ; but if weak in them, lead the best you have. By this play the weakest hand will support the strongest.

24. If an ace is turned up on your right, and you hold

[ocr errors]

king, queen, and knave, lead the knave, for it is a secure lead.

25. If an ace is turned up on the right, and you hold king, queen, and ten, lead the king; and upon the return of trumps, play the ten. For by this means you show a great strength to your partner, and will probably make two tricks in them.

26. If a king is turned up on the right, and you hold a queen, knave, and nine, lead the knave; and upon the return of trumps, play the nine. Because it may prevent the ten from making.

27. If a king is turned up on your right, and you hold knave, ten, and nine, lead the nine. Because this method will best disclose your strength in trumps.

28. If a queen is turned up on the right, and you hold ce, king, and knave, lead the king; and upon the return of trumps, play the knave. Because you are cer. tain to make the knave.

29. If a queen is turned up on the right, and you hold ace, king, and small ones, lead the king; and upon the return of trumps, you may finesse, unless the queen falls, for otherwise the queen will make a trick.

30. If a knave is turned up on the right, and you hold king, queen, and ten, lead the queen; and upon the return of trumps, play the ten. For by these means you will make the ten.

31. If a knave is turned up on the right, and you hold king, queen, and small ones, lead the king; and if that comes home, play a small one. For it is probable your partner holds the ace.

32. If a knave is turned up on the right, and you hold king ten, or queen ten, with two small cards, lead a small one; and upon the return of trumps, play the ten. For it is five to four that your partner holds one honour.

When you turn up an Honour. 1. If you turn up an ace, and hold only one small trump with it, if either adversary leads the king, pution the ace. For it can do the adversaries no greater injury.

2. If you turn lip an ace, and hold two or three small trumps with it, and either adversary lead the king, put on a small one. For if you play the ace, you give up the cominand in trumps.

3. If you turn up a king, and hold only one small trump with it, and your right hand adversary leads a crump, play the king. This case is really somewhat doubiful, and very good players think differently.

4. If you turn up a king, and hold two or three small trumps with it, if your right hand adversary leads A trump, play a small one. It being the best way of securing your king.

5. If you turn up a queen or a knave, and hold only small trumps with it, if your right hand adversary leads a trump, put on a small one. It being the securest play.

6. If you hold a sequence to the honour turned up, play it last. By this means your partner will be the best acquainted with your strength in trumps.

Of playing for the Odd Trick. 1. Be cautious of trumping out, notwithstanding you have a good hand. For since you want the odd trick only, it would be absurd to play a great game.

2. Never trump out if your partner appears likely to trump a suit. For it is evidently best to let your partner make his trumps.

3. If you are moderately strong in trumps, it is right to force your partner. For by this means you probably gain a trick."

4. Make your tricks early, and be cautious of finessing. That you may not be greatly injured, though you fail of making the odd trick.

5. If you hold a single card of any suit, and only two or three sinall truinps, Jead the single card. For it will give you a chance of making a small trump

General Rules. 1. Be very cautious how you change suits, and let do artifice of the adversary induce you to it.

2. Keep a commanding card to bring in your strong suit when the trumps are out, if your hand will admit of such pretensions.

3. Never keep back your partner's suit in trumps, but return them the first opportunity.

4. If you hold a strong suit, and but few trumps, ra. ther force your adversaries than lead trumps, unless you are strong in the other suits likewise.

5. Be sure to make the odd trick when it is in your power.

6. Always consider the score, and play your hand accordingly.

7. In a backward game, you may often risk one trick in order to win two, but in a forward game you are to be more cautious, unless you have a good probability of getting up.

8. In returning your partner's lead, play the best you have, when you hold but three originally.

9. Remember what cards drop from each hand, how many of each sort are out, and what is the best remaining card in each.

10. Lead not originally from a suit of which you have ace and queen, ace and knave, or king and knave; if you hold another moderate suit.

11. If neither of your adversaries will lead from the above suits, you must do it yourself with a sinal) card.

12. You are strong in trumps, with five small ones, or three small ones and one honour.

13. Do not trump a card when you are strong in trumps, and the more especially if you hold a strong suit.

14. If you hold only a few small trumps, make them if you can.

15. If your partner refuses to trump a suit of which he knows you have not the best, lead him your best trump the first opportunity.

16. If you partner has trumped a suit, and refuses to play trumps, lead hini that suit again.

17. Never force your partner but when you are strong in trumps, unless you have a reuounce yourself, or want only the odd trick.

18. If the adversaries trump out, and your partner has a renounce, give himn that suit when you get the lead, if you think he has a small trump left.

19. Lead not froin an ace suit originally, if you hold four in number of another suit.

20. When trumps are either returned by your partner, or led by the adversaries, you may finesse deeply in them; keeping the command all you can, in your own hand.

21. If you lead the king of any suit, and make it, you must not thence conclude that your partner has the ace.

22. It is sometimes proper to lead a thirteenth card, in order to force the adversary, and make your partner last player.

23. If weak in trumps, make your trumps soon; but when strong in them,you may play a more backwardgame.

24. Keep a small card of your partner's first lead, if possible, in order to return it when the trumps are out.

« ZurückWeiter »