The Tusculan disputations, book first ; the dreams of Scipio: and extracts from the dialogues on old age and friendship

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John Bartlett, 1851 - 207 Seiten
 

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Seite 192 - Sirens' harmony, That sit upon the nine infolded spheres, And sing to those that hold the vital shears, And turn the adamantine spindle round, On which the fate of Gods and men is wound. Such sweet compulsion doth in music lie, To lull the daughters of Necessity, And keep unsteady Nature to her law, And the low world in measured motion draw After the heavenly tune, which none can hear Of human mould, with gross unpurged ear...
Seite xiv - Nor thro' the questions men may try, The petty cobwebs we have spun : If e'er when faith had fall'n asleep, I heard a voice, "Believe no more," And heard an ever-breaking shore That tumbled in the godless deep; A warmth within the breast would melt The freezing reason's colder part, And like a man in wrath the heart Stood up and answer'd, "I have felt.
Seite 131 - Lets in Defilement to the inward parts, The soul grows clotted by contagion, Imbodies and imbrutes, till she quite lose The divine property of her first being. Such are those thick and gloomy shadows damp, Oft seen in charnel vaults, and sepulchres, Lingering, and sitting by a new-made grave, As loath to leave the body that it loved, And linked itself by carnal sensuality To a degenerate and degraded state.
Seite 180 - Shoots into port at some well-havened isle, • Where spices breathe, and brighter seasons smile, There sits quiescent on the floods, that show Her beauteous form reflected clear below, While airs impregnated with incense play Around her, fanning light her streamers gay ; — So thou, with sails how swift ! hast reached the shore " Where tempests never beat
Seite 33 - Nee vero deus ipse, qui intelligitur a nobis, alio modo intelligi potest nisi mens soluta quaedam et libera, segregata ab omni concretione mortali, omnia sentiens et movens ipsaque praedita 67 motu sempiterno." Hoc e genere atque eadem e natura est humana mens.
Seite 2 - In quo eo magis nobis est elaborandum, quod multi iam esse libri Latini dicuntur scripti inconsiderate ab optimis illis quidem viris, sed non satis eruditis. Fieri autem potest ut recte quis sentiat et id, quod sentit, polite eloqui non possit...
Seite 79 - Igitur alte spectare si voles , atque hanc sedem et aeternam domum contueri ; neque te sermonibus vulgi dederis, nec in praemiis humanis spem posueris rerum tuarum : suis te oportet illecebris ipsa virtus trahat ad verum decus. Quid de te alii loquantur , ipsi videant ; sed loquentur tamen. Sermo autem omnis ille et angustiis cingitur us regionum , quas vides , nec umquam de ullo perennis fiiit , et obruitur hominum interitu, et oblivione posteritatis extinguitur.
Seite 80 - Deum te igitur scito esse : siquidem deus est, qui viget, qui sentit, qui meminit, qui providet, qui tam regit et moderatur et movet id corpus, cui praepositus est, quam hunc mundum ille princeps deus; et ut mundum ex quadam parte mortalem ipse deus aeternus, sic fragile corpus animus sempiternus movet.
Seite 180 - ... brighter seasons smile; There sits quiescent on the floods, that show Her beauteous form reflected clear below While airs impregnated with incense play Around her, fanning light her streamers gay, So thou, with sails how swift! hast reached the shore "Where tempests never beat nor billows roar;" And thy loved consort on the dangerous tide Of life long since has anchored by thy side.
Seite 80 - Deum te igitur scito esse, si quidem est deus qui viget, qui sentit, qui meminit, qui providet, qui tam regit et moderatur et movet id corpus cui praepositus est quam hunc mundum ille princeps deus ; et ut mundum ex quadam parte mortalem ipse deus aeternus, sic fragile corpus animus sempiternus movet.

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