Beyond Deserving: Children, Parents, and Responsibility Revisited

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Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 18.05.2007 - 170 Seiten
Drawing on thirty years of practicing psychotherapy, Dorothy Martyn here gives readers a unique look into a play-therapy room where three children individually present their own journeys over some months. These children, in that setting, provide us with a special lens through which we can better understand what transpires in their minds -- and in ours.

Through the children's creative, poetic utterances -- enhanced by the poetry of Emily Dickinson and other literary giants -- Beyond Deserving persuasively argues against the justice idea of reward according to what is deserved and for the superior potency of a beyond-deserving model in cultivating love and creative work in children. Written primarily for parents and other mentors -- teachers, youth leaders, counselors, and so on -- Beyond Deserving draws the subject of child rearing back to its roots in the biblical declaration of unconditional love, love that moves first, without a prior "deserving."

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Ausgewählte Seiten

Inhalt

VIII
3
IX
4
X
5
XI
8
XII
11
XIII
13
XIV
22
XV
23
XLIII
84
XLIV
86
XLV
90
XLVI
92
XLVII
97
XLIX
100
L
104
LI
108

XVI
25
XVII
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XVIII
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XIX
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XX
37
XXI
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XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXV
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XXVI
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XXVII
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XXVIII
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XXIX
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XXX
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XXXI
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XXXII
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XXXIV
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XXXVI
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XXXVII
68
XXXVIII
76
XXXIX
80
XL
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XLI
82
XLII
83
LII
110
LIII
114
LIV
120
LV
121
LVI
122
LVII
123
LVIII
125
LIX
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LX
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LXI
129
LXII
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LXIII
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LXIV
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LXVII
134
LXVIII
135
LXIX
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LXX
148
LXXI
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LXXIII
155
LXXIV
156
LXXV
159
LXXVI
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LXXVII
162
LXXVIII
164
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Beliebte Passagen

Seite 102 - Thou little Child, yet glorious in the might Of heaven-born freedom on thy being's height, Why with such earnest pains dost thou provoke The years to bring the inevitable yoke, Thus blindly with thy blessedness at strife? Full soon thy Soul shall have her earthly freight, And custom lie upon thee with a weight, Heavy as frost, and deep almost as life!
Seite 87 - See, where mid work of his own hand he lies, Fretted by sallies of his Mother's kisses, With light upon him from his Father's eyes ! See, at his feet, some little plan or chart, Some fragment from his dream of human life.
Seite 157 - Bru. Yes, Cassius ; and, from henceforth, When you are over-earnest with your Brutus, He'll think your mother chides, and leave you so.
Seite 101 - The Sick Rose O rose, thou art sick; The invisible worm That flies in the night, In the howling storm, Has found out thy bed Of crimson joy, And his dark secret love Does thy life destroy.
Seite x - He ate and drank the precious words, His spirit grew robust; He knew no more that he was poor, Nor that his frame was dust. He danced along the dingy days, And this bequest of wings Was but a book. What liberty A loosened spirit brings!
Seite 65 - Do you hear, let them be well used ; for they are the abstract, and brief chronicles, of the time. After your death you were better have a bad epitaph, than their ill report while you live. Pol. My lord, I will use them according to their desert.
Seite 76 - I reckon, when I count at all, First Poets — then the Sun — Then Summer — then the Heaven of God — And then the list is done. But looking back — the first so seems To comprehend the whole — The others look a needless show, So I write Poets — All.

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