The Works of George Chapman ...

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Chatto and Windus, 1875
 

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Seite 61 - And for his love Europa bellowing loud, And tumbling with the Rainbow in a cloud : Blood-quaffing Mars heaving the iron net, Which limping Vulcan and his Cyclops set; Love kindling fire, to burn such towns as Troy...
Seite lxv - If all the pens that ever poets held Had fed the feeling of their masters' thoughts. And every sweetness that inspired their hearts. Their minds, and muses on admired themes; If all the heavenly quintessence they still From their immortal flowers of poesy, Wherein, as in a mirror, we perceive The highest reaches of a human wit; If these had made one poem's period, And all combined in beauty's worthiness, Yet should there hover in their restless heads One thought, one grace...
Seite 60 - Her wide sleeves green, and bordered with a grove, Where Venus in her naked glory strove To please the careless and disdainful eyes Of proud Adonis that before her lies. Her kirtle blue, whereon was many a stain, Made with the blood of wretched lovers slain.
Seite xxiii - Peele, whose day was now well over ; and even for the firstfruits of ' a person of most reverend aspect, religious and temperate, qualities rarely meeting in a poet,' it will be admitted that the moral tone of Chapman's two earliest comedies is not remarkably high. The first deals solely with the impossible frauds, preposterous adulteries, and farcical murders committed by a disguised hero who assumes the mask of as many pseudonyms to perpetrate his crimes as ever were assumed in Old or New...
Seite xxxv - What you start from is nothing so definite as an emotion, in any ordinary sense; it is still more certainly not an idea; it is— to adapt two lines of Beddoes to a different meaning— a bodiless childful of life in the gloom Crying with frog voice, "what shall I be?
Seite 60 - Amorous Leander, beautiful and young, (Whose tragedy divine Musaeus sung) Dwelt at Abydos; since him dwelt there none For whom succeeding times make greater moan. His dangling tresses that were never shorn, Had they been cut and unto Colchos borne, Would have allured the venturous youth of Greece To hazard more than for the Golden Fleece.
Seite 85 - Virtue's only tire, The reaped harvest of the light, Bound up in sheaves of sacred fire. Love calls to war ; Sighs his alarms, Lips his swords are, The field his arms. Come, Night, and lay thy velvet hand On glorious Day's outfacing face ; And all thy crowned flames command, For torches to our nuptial grace. Love calls to war ; Sighs his alarms. Lips his swords are, The field his arms.
Seite 60 - Where sparrows perched, of hollow pearl and gold, Such as the world would wonder to behold; Those with sweet water oft her handmaid fills, Which, as she went, would chirrup through the bills.
Seite lii - All sounds in air ; and left so free mine ears, That I might hear the music of the spheres, And all the angels singing out of heaven ; Whose tunes were solemn, as to passion given ; For now, that Justice was the happiness there For all the wrongs to Right inflicted here, Such was the passion that Peace now put on ; And on all went ; when suddenly was gone All light of heaven before us ; from a wood, Whose...
Seite 63 - Commit'st a sin far worse than perjury, Even sacrilege against her deity, Through regular and formal purity. To expiate which sin, kiss and shake hands ; Such sacrifice as this Venus demands.

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