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Such duteous zeal the Prophet's laws Art. XXI.-1. Pietas Privata.demand,

The Book of Private Derotion : And falled raptures of his promis'd land. For woe to him, who ne'er with awe pro

A series of Prayers and Meditafound

tions ; with an Introductory EsAt Mecca's shrine hath kiss'd the holy

say on Prayer, chiefly from the ground:

writings of Hannah More. For him, denied celestial joys to share, 2. Daily Communings, Spiritual No blooming Houris shall his couch and Devotional. By the Right prepare;

Rev. George Horne. London : But his the doom, where countless hor

Nisbet, 1831. rors reign, To feel a dark eternity of pain;

We are glad to meet with such Of deep remorse the bitter tear to shed, publications as these, for never was Each hope of Paradise for ever fled.'- there a period, perhaps, in the his

tory of the world, when they were so much wanted. Mrs. Hannah More's religions feelings are well

known-her whole life having been Art. XX.–Stories for Young Children.

one round of dedication to pious By the Author of and benevolent thoughts.

Dr. “ Conversations on Chemistry,” &c. 12mo, pp. 103. London :

Horne's Communings' form a Longman, &c. 1831.

complete manual of religion in

themselves. A passage is selected A very pretty little book, well cal

from the Psalms, which is slightly culated to explain to children, in lan- amplified, and at the same time exguage which they may easily com- pounded, in the prayer, or rather we prehend, many of the common ob- might call it the aspiration that foljects wbich at first puzzle their lows it; and thus a small volume uninformed minds, such as the build

is composed, which may be said to ing of houses, the planting of trees, contain the spiritual essence of the the manufacture of bricks, the cut

whole Book of the Psalms. One ting of glass, and some of the sim

of these prayers is appropriated to plest elements of mechanics. The

each day in the year. The two voincidents of the stories in which lumes are beautifully printed, and these things are explained are na- would easily find room in a gentletural and sufficiently attractive. man's waistcoat-pocket, or a lady's

reticule.

MISCELLANEOUS INTELLIGENCE.

Thunder Storms.-In England, the remaining seven were in the thunder-storms generally occur in morning. the afternoon. Of thirty-five re- Flower Stakes.- No person who markable ones which are noticed is fond of flowers should think of in the Philosophical Transactions, using wooden laths to support twenty-seven commenced between them. A much more substantial, noon and midnight ; generally it as well as an infinitely more elewas about three or four in the gant substitute for the lath will be afternoon. One lasted all day, and found in the delicate iron stakes

which are now manufactured for that purpose, and which are particularly well calculated for sustaining all the tall growing plants, such as fuschias, georginas, pinks, and others which require protection against high winds. The evil of wood is, that it soon becomes decayed, and easily yielding to the blast, both plant and stake fall at once to the ground. Moreover, the iron rod from its slightness is much less conspicuous than the wood, and consequently tends in no degree to diminish the natural beauty of the plant to which it lends assistance.

Red Spiders.-These insects are the pest of some gardens. It is recommended by an experimentalist, that the leaves of plants which they infest, should be frequently syringed on both sides with clear water, which has been found completely to destroy them. In green-houses the same effect may be produced, by the application of steam.

Atmospheric Tides.-It has been inferred with a great degree of probability, from a variety of ascertained facts, that there exists an analogy between the lunar influence on the tides of the ocean and the temperature of the atmosphere. During the last winter, the lowest degree of temperature, both in London and Paris, was in each period of frost the day, or day but one, after one of the lunar quarters.

Elevation of Territory.- From observations that have been made by Boblaye, in the Morea and Egina, it appears that the whole soil of the Peninsula has risen considerably, not in a continuous manner, but by sudden starts, so that the grounds abandoned by the sea, are marked out in steps or layers, in irregular gradations.

Mr. Campbell.-This gentleman

has of late been a watcher of the dead. The breath had scarcely quitted the frame of Sir Thomas Lawrence, when the author of the "Pleasures of Hope" was proclaimed as already engaged upon the memoirs of the illustrious artist. The task, however, if ever really undertaken, was soon abandoned. Now, again, a similar trick is played off with respect to Mrs. Siddons, who was no sooner buried than her will was opened, bequeathing to the same gentleman the task of celebrating her name to all posterity. It is said that she has left considerable materials for her biography if so, we hope that they will be consigned to some person who really will make use of them.

Cholera Morbus.-It is reported that this dreadful malady has already found its way to Vienna, and to Pest in Hungary. It appears from the Riga Medical Report up to the morning of the 15th of June, that the total number of hospital patients was 1,386; cured, 308; dead, 798; house patients, 1,226; cured, 558; dead, 488. Total, 2,612 cured, 866; dead, 1,286; and left, 466. The physicians say that the disease is now of a much milder character than at first. From the 31st of May to the 1st June, there were only twenty-four deaths; from the 1st (13th) to the 2d (14th) thirty-one deaths, but only seventynine new cases. From the 2d (14th) to the 3d (15th) twenty-nine, and eighty-five new cases, whilst hitherto upwards of 100 people were daily attacked. The number of hospital deaths alone was from sixty to seventy daily.

M. Bonpland. - Tidings have been at length received of this eminent naturalist. From a letter written by him to a friend at Buenos Ayres, it appears, notwithstanding all the reports which have been

he says,

propagated to the contrary, that ment to me. I had never given he has been at perfect liberty during any one cause of complaint, --I had the whole period of his stay in Pa- endeavoured to gain the esteem of raguay. He was latterly getting all. Even the Supreme Dictator, opulent, which appears to have from my arrival in the republic been the real cause of his dis- until the 12th of May, 1829, had missal. He quite regrets his de- allowed me the greatest liberty, and parture, if we are to believe the the heads of the department in language of his epistle.“ In order," which I was domiciliated treated

“to put an end to the me with kindness. At last, as every melancholy suppositions which you thing has an end, the director defiand all my friends must naturally nitively decreed my departure from have made relative to my existence Paraguay, and has done it in the during the nine years of my deten- most generous manner. I am at tion in Paraguay, I must tell you, liberty, and soon hope to embrace that I have passed as happy a life you. as could be expected by one de- Optical deception.-Upon the Liprived of all communication with verpool and Manchester rail-road, his country, his family, and his when the carriages are proceeding friends. The practice of medicine at the rate of fourteen or fifteen has always afforded me the means miles an hour, the rail, as well as of subsistence; but as this did not the trees and houses on each side, entirely occupy my time, I em- seem to the eye of the traveller to ployed myself, from disposition and move in a contrary direction ; but necessity, in agriculture, which has when the speed is doubled, though given me infinite enjoyments. At the trees and houses still appear to the same time I had established a preserve their contrary progress, manufactory of brandy and liqueurs, the iron rail on the road seems to and likewise a carpenter's and a move in the direction of the carblacksmith's shop, which not only riages, and as it were to emulate defrayed the expenses of my agri- their velocity. This is the effect of cultural establishment, but yielded an optical deception. The rails some profits from the work per. have, at certain distances, slight irformed for private individuals. In regularities in their junction with this manner I had acquired the each other, wbich, when the velomeans of living with the greatest city is moderate, are sufficient to arcomfort. On the 12th of May, 1829, rest the eye in passing, and to give without any preliminary, the autho- them an appearance, while they are rities of Santiago communicated to passed, of receding in a contrary dime the order of the Supreine Di- rection. But when the speed is rector to leave the country. This greatly increased, these irregulariintimation was a mixture of justice ties are no longer discernible ; – and wrong, which I cannot yet ac- there is nothing seen upon the rails count for in a positive manner. In to shew that any particular part is short, driven about from the 12th passed by, and the whole seems to of May, 1829, to 2d of February, move with the carriages,wbereas the 1831--that is, during twenty months trees and houses are still sufficientand twenty days—I at length passed ly defined objects, and still seem to the Parana with all the honours of bave been passed by as before. war. This second epoch of my life Philosopher Walker.-It is with in Paraguay has been real punish- much regret we learn that the daughter of the late Adam Walker, a patent for such a combination of a man who rendered so many ser- contrivances, which are already sevices to his country, whose life in- parately known, as makes their deed is truly said to have been one steam carriages better calculated to continued and devoted effort to in- overcome the inequalities of roads crease the intelligence, and advance than any other now in use. They the interests, and improve the con- may be turned round the sharpest dition of the human species, is vow corner with as much ease as a stage a widow, with a son and daughter coach. In order to prevent the wholly unprovided for, and is left loss of speed caused upon rail-roads exposed to the want of the common by ascents, Messrs. Vignoles and necessaries of existence. Assuredly Ericson have added a third rail in some provision ought to be made the centre of the road, proportioned for the descendants of an individual, to the requisite distance, in which who has deserved at least fully as rail there are teeth that catch a cenwell of his counrry as most of the tral wheel contrived for the purgreat sinecurists by whose pensions pose of assisting the vehicle up the it is burthened.

inclined plane. Mr. Roscoe.—The literary world Church Patronage.-The Duke has recently lost one of the most of Buccleugh inherits no fewer than distinguished, as well as the most thirty patronages in Scotland. The venerable of its members, in Mr. following is a list of the parishes Roscoe, who was long known to whose ecclesiastical livings are at the public as an elegant historian, bis disposal :-Dalkeith, Kirknewand an honest patriot. He had town, Inveresk, Hawick, Wiltown, reached his 80th year, and died on St. Boswell's, Melrose, Middlebie, Thursday, the 30th of June, at his Dornock, Hoddam, Kirkmichael, house in Lodge-lane, Liverpool. Langholm, Canobie, Castletown, We are given to understand that Ewes, Westerkirk, Eskdale Muir, the life and correspondence of Mr. Terregles, Kirkmachoe, Kirkbean, Roscoe are already in preparation Colvend, Lochrutton, Penport, Keir, for the press by some of the mem- Glencairn, Tynron, Kirkconnel, bers of his family. These, together Durrisdeer, Morton, Sanquhar. with his miscellaneous works on a Joun of Arc.-A most remarkable variety of important subjects, will monument has lately been discobe printed uniformly with an octavo vered at Orleans. It is no other edition of the Lives of Lorenzo and than the greater part of the turrets Leo X. The correspondence, we of the old bridge that formed so disunderstand, embraces a period of tinguished a scene in that interestnearly sixty years, during which this ing episode of the history of France, celebrated writer was in the habit of of which Joan of Arc was the hecommunicating with the most dis- roine. tinguished characters of the age, Bees.-By the successful mode both literary and political.

in wbich Nr. Nutt manages his Steam Carriages. There is little bees, he contrives to obtain from doubt that these vehicles will soon one hive, in the course of five years, be brought to a degree of perfection, nearly eight hundred pounds of which will enable them to be ap- honey, clear of all charges. His plied to the purposes of conveyance plan is not only thus productive beboth of goods and passengers on yond all others, but he never loses a the high road. Messrs. Heaton, of bee, unless by natural demise or Birmingham, have recently obtained mere accident. There is no swarmpropagated to the contrary, that ment to me. I had never given he has been at perfect liberty during any one cause of complaint,--I had the whole period of his stay in Pa- endeavoured to gain the esteem of raguay. He was latterly getting all. Even the Supreme Dictator, opulent, which appears to have from my arrival in the republic been the real cause of his dis- until the 12th of May, 1829, had missal. He quite regrets his de- allowed me the greatest liberty, and parture, if we are to believe the the heads of the department in language of his epistle. “In order," which I was domiciliated treated he says,

“ to put an end to the me with kindness. At last, as every melancholy suppositions which you thing has an end, the director defiand all my friends must naturally mitively decreed my departure from have made relative to my existence Paraguay, and has done it in the during the nine years of my deten- most generous manner. I am at tion in Paraguay, I must tell you, liberty, and soon hope to embrace that I have passed as happy a life you." as could be expected by one de- Optical deception.-Upon the Liprived of all communication with verpool and Manchester rail-road, his country, his family, and his when the carriages are proceeding friends. The practice of medicine at the rate of fourteen or fifteen has always afforded me the means miles an hour, the rail, as well as of subsistence; but as this did not the trees and houses on each side, entirely occupy my time, I em- seem to the eye of the traveller to ployed myself, from disposition and move in a contrary direction ; but necessity, in agriculture, which has when the speed is doubled, though given me infinite enjoyments. At the trees and houses still appear to the same time I had established a preserve their contrary progress, manufactory of brandy and liqueurs, the iron rail on the road seems to and likewise a carpenter's and a move in the direction of the carblacksmith's shop, which not only riages, and as it were to emulate defrayed the expenses of my agri- their velocity. This is the effect of cultural establishment, but yielded an optical deception. The rails some profits from the work per- have, at certain distances, slight irformed for private individuals. In regularities in their junction with this manner I had acquired the each other, wbich, when the velomeans of living with the greatest city is moderate, are sufficient to arcomfort. On the 12th of May, 1829, rest the eye in passing, and to give without any preliminary, the autho- them an appearance, while they are rities of Santiago communicated to passed, of receding in a contrary dime the order of the Supreine Di- rection. But when the speed is rector to leave the country. This greatly increased, these irregulariintimation was a mixture of justice ties are no longer discernible;and wrong, which I cannot yet ac- there is nothing seen upon the rails count for in a positive manner. In to shew that any particular part is short, driven about from the 12th passed by, and the whole seems to of May, 1829, to 2d of February, inove with the carriages,wbereas the 1831--that is, during twenty months trees and houses are still sufficientand twenty days—I at length passed ly defined objects, and still seem to the Parana with all the honours of bave been passed by as before. war. This second epoch of my life Philosopher Walker.-It is with in Paraguay has been real punish. much regret we learn that the

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