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TO MRS. MARY HEWSON.

Philadelphia, 30 May, 1786.

Dear Polly,

I have just received your kind letter of April 2d, which made me some amends for your long silence. By the last ship from hence I wrote to you acknowledging the receipt of some very old letters, when I was sorry I could mention none of later date. I have, however, no right to complain, being so bad a correspondent myself. But my last was a long one, and I hope you have received it.

You seem now inclined to come over, if you could meet with a captain, that you know and like. We mentioned it to Captain Falconer. He goes no more to sea, but strongly recommends Captain Willet, who carries this letter, as a good man and excellent seaman. His ship is the Harmony, which lately brought over Mr. and Mrs. Bingham. Mr. Williams will hardly, I doubt, be with you in time this year to assist in your embarkation; but, if you apply to Messrs. Johnson and Company, American merchants, to whom I write, I am persuaded they will make the bargain for you, and assist you with their advice in every circumstance.

Temple, who presents his respects, has, however, no hopes of your coming. He says you were so long irresolute and wavering about the journey to Paris, that he thinks it unlikely you will decide firmly to make the voyage to America.

I enclose a truer state of affairs in our country, than your public prints will afford you, and I pray "God guide you."

This family are all well . and join in love to you and yours with your affectionate

B. Franklin.

P. S. Captain Willet is to leave London on his return about the 1st of August . Your son Ben, and all this family, join in the hope of your resolving to come over.*

FROM WILLIAM COCKE TO B. FRANKLIN.

Concerning a new State called Franklin.

State of Franklin, 15 June, 1780.

Sis,

I make no doubt but you have heard, that the good people of this country have declared themselves a separate State from North Carolina; and that, as a testimony of the high esteem they have for the many important and faithful services you have rendered to your country, they have called the name of their State after you. I presume you have also heard the reasons, on which our separation is founded, some of which are as follows; that North Carolina had granted us a separation on certain well-known conditions, expressed in an act of the General Assembly of that State, which conditions, we think, she had no right to break through without our consent, as well as the consent of Congress. We therefore determine strictly to adhere to the conditions expressed in said act, and doubt not but Congress will be uniform in their just demands, as well as honorable in complying with their resolve to confirm all the just claims of such persons, as have purchased land under the laws of North Carolina, for which they have paid that State.

The confidence we have in the wisdom and justice of the United States inclines us to leave every matter of

* Mrs. Hewson soon afterwards came over with her family to America, and established herself at Philadelphia. See VoL VII. p. 15L

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P. S. Captain Willet is to leave London on his return about the 1st of August . Your son Ben, and all this family, join in the hope of your resolving to

FROM WILLIAM COCKE TO B. FRANKLIN.

Concerning a new State called Franklin.

State of Franklin, 15 June, 1788.

Sir,

I make no doubt but you have heard, that the good people of this country have declared themselves a separate State from North Carolina; and that, as a testimony of the high esteem they have for the many important and faithful services you have rendered to your country, they have called the name of their State after you. I presume you have also heard the reasons, on which our separation is founded, some of which are as follows; that North Carolina had granted us a separation on certain well-known conditions, expressed in an act of the General Assembly of that State, which conditions, we think, she had no right to break through without our consent, as well as the consent of Congress. We therefore determine strictly to adhere to the conditions expressed in said act, and doubt not but Congress will be uniform in their just demands, as well as honorable in complying with their resolve to confirm all the just claims of such persons, as have purchased land under the laws of North Carolina, Car which they have paid that State.

The confidence we have in the wisdom and justice of the United States inclines us to leave every matter of dispute to their decision, and' I am expressly empowered and commanded to give the United States full assurance, that we shall act in obedience to their determination, provided North Carolina will consent that they shall become the arbiters. I had set out with the intention to wait on Congress to discharge the duties of the trust reposed in me, but I am informed, that Congress will adjourn about the last of this month; and I will thank you to be so kind as to favor me with a few lines by the bearer, Mr. Rogers, to inform me when Congress will meet again, and shall be happy to have your sentiments and advice on so important a subject. I have the honor to be, &c.

* Mrs. Hewson soon afterwards came over with her family to America, and established herself at Philadelphia. See VoL VII. p. 151.

William Cocke.

TO NOAH WEBSTER.

On a Reformed Alphabet.

Philadelphia, 18 June, 1786.

I received the letter you did me the honor of writing to me the 24th past, with the scheme enclosed of your reformed alphabet. I think the reformation not only necessary, but practicable; but have so much to say to you on the subject, that I wish to see and confer with you upon it, as that would save much time in writing; sounds, till such an alphabet is fixed, not being easily explained or discoursed of clearly upon paper.

I have formerly considered this matter pretty fully, and contrived some of the means of carrying it into execution, so as gradually to render the reformation general. Our ideas are so nearly similar, that I make no doubt of our easily agreeing on the plan; and you may depend on the best support I may be able to give it, as a

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