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I thank you, Sir, for your Dissertation on the Laws of Lycurgus, and your Testament de fortuné Ricard.* With the latter work I was already acquainted. I had read it with pleasure, and conceived a high opinion of its author. I have just read your Dissertation. If my own approbation could add any thing to that of the celebrated Academy, which has awarded to you the prize, I should tell you, that I have been highly gratified, and that I only regret I can give you no other prize, than the sentiments of regard and respect, with which I am, Sir, &c.

B. FRANKLIN.

FROM M. DE CASTRIES TO B. FRANKLIN.

Translation.

Versailles, 10 July, 1785.

SIR,

I was not apprized, until within a few hours, of the arrangements which you have made for your departure. Had I been informed of it sooner, I should have proposed to the King to order a frigate to convey you to your own country, in a manner suitable to the known importance of the services you have been engaged in, to the esteem you have acquired in

provided for, than by that odious and vexatious, as well as unjust method, of gathering tythes in kind, which creates animosities and litigations, to the interruption of the good harmony and respect, which might otherwise subsist between the rectors and their parishioners.

" And thus, conscious of upright meaning, we submit this abridgment to the serious consideration of the prudent and dispassionate, and not to enthusiasts and bigots; being convinced in our own breasts, that this shortened method, or one of the same kind better executed, would further religion, increase unanimity, and occasion a more frequent attendance on the worship of God."

* A translation of this curious piece was published by Dr. Price in London, as an Appendix to his Observations on the Importance of the American Revolution.

| This letter is translated from a French copy.

France, and the particular esteem which his Majesty entertains for you.

I pray you, Sir, to accept my regrets, and the renewed assurance of the most entire consideration, with which I have the honor to be, Sir, your very humble and very obedient servant,

DE CASTRIES.*

* Extract from a letter to his sister in America.

“ St. Germain, twelve miles from Paris, 13th July, 1785. I left Passy yesterday afternoon, and am here on my way to Havre de Grace, a seaport, in order to embark for America. I make use of one of the King's litters, carried by mules, which walk steadily and easily, so that I bear the motion very well. I am to be taken on board a Philadelphia ship on the coast of England, (Captain Truxtun,) the beginning of next month. Not having written to you since the letter, which contained a bill on Mr. Vernon, and as I may not have another opportunity before my arrival in Philadelphia (if it pleases God I do arrive), I write these particulars to go by way of England, that you may be less uneasy about me. I did my last public act in this country just before I set out, which was signing a treaty of amity and commerce with Prussia. I have continued to work till late in the day; it is time I should go home and go to bed.”

CORRESPONDENCE,

PART FOURTH;

COMPRISING

PRIVATE LETTERS,

FROM

THE TERMINATION OF THE AUTHOR'S MISSION TO FRANCE

THE END OF HIS LIFE.

1785-1790.

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