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paintes of husbandrie.

A hundreth good pointes, of good husbandry,
maintaineth good household, with huswifry
House keping and husbandry, if it be good:
must loue one another, as cousinnes in blood.
The wife to, must husband as well as the man :
or farewel thy husbandry, doe what thou can.

[Set forth by

Thomas Tusser, Gentleman;

Seryant to the Honorable Lord Paget of Beaudesert.

COPIED FROM THE FIRST Edition, 1557.)

LONDON:

REPRINTED FOR ROBERT TRIPHOOK, 37, ST. JAMES'S STREET, AND

WILLIAM SANCHO, AT THE MEWS GAT..

1810.

T. Bensley, Printer, Bolt Court, Fleet Street, London.

Dr. Mavor has announced his intention of giving to the public a new edition of the present once popular work of Tusser, collated with the various editions which passed the press in the Sixteenth Century, and afterwards. For these editions were not confined to the time of the author's life, who died very aged, as early as 1580. Mr. Walter Scott has given, in the Third Volume of the Somers Tracts, a copy of the edition of 1599 by Peter Short. The present reprint of the first edition of 1557, which exhibits the prima stamina of this work, is offered to the curious reader for the purpose of affording a comparative view of the progress of the author's mind, and of a production which was once probably in the hands, or committed to the memories of almost all the country-gentlemen, and others connected wsth husbandry, in the kingdom. The original consists of seventeen leaves, which are now given in ten. So very greatly was it enlarged in subsequent impressions, that it fills 144 quarto pages (closely printed) in Mr. Scott's late republication.

One other recommendation the present copy may have, that it is less tedious than the poem in its last state, and preserves all the vigour of the original conception, which future expansion never fails to weaken.

March 28, 1810.

To the right honorable and my speciall good lord and maister, the Lord Paget, Lord priuie seale.

THOMAS

TUSS ER

The trouth doth teache that tyme must serue.
(How euer man doth blase hys mynde)
(Of thynges most lyke to thryue or sterue:)
Much apt to iudge is often blynde.
And therefore, tyme it doth behoofe:
Shall make of trouth a perfit proofe.
Take you, my lord, and mayster than,
(Vnlesse mischaunce, mischaunseth me:)
Such homely gyft of your own man,
Synce more in court, I may not be:
And let your praise wonne here tofore,

Remayne abrode for euermore.
z My seruyng you thus vnderstande,

And God his helpe and yours withall:
Dyd cause good lucke, to take myne bande
Erecting one, most lyke to fall:
My seruing you I know it was,
Enforced this to come to passe.
So synce I was at Cambridge tought,
Of court ten yeres I made a say ;
No musicke than was left vnsought,
A care I had to serue that way,
My ioy gan slake then made I chaunge,
Expulsed myrth, for musike straunge.

MA DE

ME

My musike synce hath been the plough,
Entangled with some care among :
The gayn not great the payn enough,
Hath made me syng another song.
And if I may my song auowe;
No man I craue, to iudge but you.

Your Seruant,

Thomas Tusser.

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