The Cornhill Magazine, Band 6

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William Makepeace Thackeray
Smith, Elder., 1899
 

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Seite 545 - This is the excellent foppery of the world, that, when we are sick in fortune, — often the surfeit of our own behaviour, — we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars...
Seite 646 - Your name from hence immortal life shall have, Though I, once gone, to all the world must die : The earth can yield me but a common grave, When you entombed in men's eyes shall lie. Your monument shall be my gentle verse, Which eyes not yet created shall o'er-read ;(45) And tongues to be your being shall rehearse, When all the breathers of this world are dead ; You still shall live, — such virtue hath my pen, — Where breath most breathes — even in the mouths of men.
Seite 672 - Tis he great deeds hath done. To the souldiers that were maimed, And wounded in the fray, The queen allowed a pension Of fifteen pence a day ; And from all costs and charges She quit and set them free : And this she did all for the sake Of brave Lord Willoughbey.
Seite 544 - These late eclipses in the sun and moon portend no good to us : Though the wisdom of nature can reason it thus and thus, yet nature finds itself scourged by the sequent effects...
Seite 55 - ... sit in the shade singing of ballads. I go to them, and compare their voices and beauties to some ancient shepherdesses that I have read of, and find a vast difference there ; but, trust me, I think these are as innocent as those could be. I talk to them, and find they want nothing to make them the happiest people in the world but the knowledge that they are so.
Seite 540 - Torn from his subjects, and his son's embrace, First let him see his friends in battle slain, And their untimely fate lament in vain : Arid when at length the cruel war shall cease, On hard conditions may he buy his peace ; Nor let him then enjoy supreme command But fall untimely by some hostile hand, And lie unburied in the common sand.
Seite 668 - Also we shall have to reject all the terrible and appalling names which describe the world below— Cocytus and Styx, ghosts under the earth, and sapless shades, and any similar words of which the very mention causes a shudder to pass through the inmost soul of him who hears them. I do not say that these horrible stories may not have a use of some kind...
Seite 539 - Lord of creatures all, Thou placer of plants both humble and tall, Was not I planted of thine...
Seite 60 - We had a Miss North and a Mr. Gould of our party; the latter walked home with me after tea. He is a very young man, just entered Oxford, wears spectacles, and has heard that "Evelina
Seite 50 - All letters, methinks, should be free and easy as one's discourse ; not studied as an oration, nor made up of hard words like a charm. 'Tis an admirable thing to see how some people will labour to find out terms that may obscure a plain sense. Like a gentleman I know, who would never say " the weather grew cold," but that

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