Biographia Dramatica: Names of dramas: A-L

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1812

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Seite 50 - We were all, at the first night of it, in great uncertainty of the event ; till we were very much encouraged by overhearing the Duke of Argyle, who sat in the next box to us, say, ' It will do — it must do ! I see it in the eyes of them.
Seite 51 - When you censure the age, Be cautious and sage, Lest the courtiers offended, should be ; If you mention vice or bribe, 'Tis so pat to all the tribe, Each cries — That was levelld at me.
Seite 50 - This was a good while before the first act was over, and so gave us ease soon ; for...
Seite 171 - I am greatly struck with the tragedy of Douglas, though it has infinite faults : the author seems to me to have retrieved the true language of the stage, which had been lost for these hundred years ; and there is one scene (between Matilda and the old peasant) so masterly, that it strikes me blind to all the defects in the work.
Seite 144 - To remark the folly of the fiction, the absurdity of the conduct, the confusion of the names and manners of different times, and the impossibility of the events in any system of life, were to waste criticism upon unresisting imbecility, upon faults too evident for detection, and too gross for aggravation.
Seite 360 - There is no scene which does not contribute to the aggravation of the distress or conduct of the action, and scarce a line which does not conduce to the progress of the scene. So powerful is the current of the poet's imagination that the mind which once ventures within it is hurried irresistibly along.
Seite 14 - True,' representing some principal pieces of the reign of Henry VIII, which was set forth with many extraordinary circumstances of pomp and majesty, even to the matting of the stage; the Knights of the order with their Georges and Garter, the guards with their embroidered coats and the like: sufficient, in truth, within a while, to make greatness very familiar, if not ridiculous.
Seite 136 - ... and then discovered his face that the spectators might see how they had transformed him, going on with their singing.
Seite 360 - And perhaps if we turn our thoughts upon the barbarity and ignorance of the age to which this story is referred, it will appear not so unlikely as while we estimate Lear's manners by our own. Such preference of one daughter to another, or resignation of dominion on such conditions, would be yet credible, if told of a petty prince of Guinea or Madagascar.
Seite 69 - D'Ambois" upon the theatre ; but when I had taken up what I supposed a fallen star, I found I had been cozened with a jelly ; * nothing but a cold, dull mass, which glittered no longer than it was shooting...

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