The Quarterly Journal of Science, Band 4

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John Churchill and Sons, 1867
 

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Seite 157 - The most insignificant insects and reptiles are of much more consequence, and have much more influence in the economy of Nature, than the incurious are aware of; and are mighty in their effect, from their minuteness, which renders them less an object of attention: and from their numbers and fecundity. Earthworms, though in appearance a small and despicable link in the chain of Nature, yet, if lost, would make a lamentable chasm.
Seite 604 - SOUND : a Course of Eight Lectures delivered at the Royal Institution of Great Britain. By JOHN TYNDALL, LL.DFRS New Edition, crown 8vo.
Seite 395 - The Calculus of Chemical Operations ; ' being a method for the investigation, by means of symbols, of the laws of the distribution of weight in chemical change ; Part I., on the construction of chemical symbols, 'Phil.
Seite 121 - I tell you, captain, if you look in the maps of the 'orld, I warrant you shall find, in the comparisons between Macedon and Monmouth, that the situations, look you, is both alike. There is a river in Macedon ; and there is also moreover a river at Monmouth...
Seite 494 - The Exhibition of 1851 is to give us a true test and a living picture of the point of development at which the whole of mankind has arrived in this great task, and a new starting point from which all nations will be able to direct their further exertions.
Seite 283 - ... -0067 in diameter, by its making a powerful electro-magnet, by its decomposing water, and by other tests. The explanation of these effects is as follows : — The electro-magnet always retains a slight residual magnetism, and is therefore in the condition of a weak permanent magnet ; the motion of the armature occasions feeble currents in alternate directions in the coils thereof, which, after being reduced to the same direction, pass into the coil of the electro-magnet in such...
Seite 142 - A General Dictionary of Geography, Descriptive, Physical, Statistical, and Historical ; forming a complete Gazetteer of the World. By A. KEITH JOHNSTON, FRSE 8vo. 31s. 6d. M'Culloch's Dictionary, Geographical, Statistical, and Historical, of the various Countries, Places, and principal Natural Objects in the World.
Seite 158 - ... worms seem to be the great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibres of plants, by drawing straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into it ; and, most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called worm-casts, which, being their excrement, is a fine manure for grain and grass.
Seite 15 - ... type in a great many groups of animals of long-continued geological existence. In these groups there is abundant evidence of variation — none of what is ordinarily understood as progression; and, if the known geological record is to be regarded as even any considerable fragment of the whole, it is inconceivable that any theory of a necessarily progressive development can stand, for the numerous orders and families cited afford no trace of such a process.
Seite 481 - A crest of topaz is no better in the struggle for existence than a crest of sapphire. A frill ending in spangles of the emerald is no better in the battle of life than a frill ending in the spangles of the ruby.

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