Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
[ocr errors]

No. No.
Pleaders, few of them tolerable company - 197] ... A chief spring of action in most men - 2.94

Pleasant fellows to be avoided - - - 462
Pleasantry, in conversation, the faults it covers 462
Pleasure, when our chief pursuit, disappoints
itself - . - - - 151
The deceitfulness of Pleasure - - 151
Pleasure and pain, a marriage proposed between
them, and concluded - - - - 183
Pliny, the necessary qualifications of a fine
speaker according to that author - -
His letter to his wife's aunt Hispulla - 525
Plutarch, for what reproved by the Spectator 483
Poems in picture - - - - - - 58
The chief things to be considered in epic poem 267
Several poems preserved for their similes 421
Poetesses, (English) wherein remarkable - 51
Poetry has the whole circle of nature for its pro-
vince - - - - - - 419

[blocks in formation]

Printing encouraged by politest nations in Eu-

rope - - - - -
Procrastination, from whence proceeding - 191
Procuress, her trade - - - - - > *
Prodicus, the first inventor of sables - - 183
Professions, the three great ones overburdened
with practitioners - - - - - et

Projector, a short description of one - - 3i
Promisers condemned - - - - - -
Promises, (neglect of) through frivolous false-
hood - - - - - - - 4.48
Pronunciation necessary to an orator - 541
Proper, (Will) an honest tale bearer - -
Prospect, a beautiful one, delights the soul
much as a demonstration - - - 411
Wide ones pleasing to the fancy - - 411
Enlivened by rivers and falls of water - 412
That of hills and valleys soon tires - - 412
Prospect of peace, a poem on that subject eom-
mended by the §: - - -
Prosperity, to what compared by Seneca -
Proverbs (the 7th chapter of) turned into verse 410

Providence demonstrative arguments for it 120
Not to be fathomed by reason - - 237 ×
Prudence, the influence it has on our good or o
ill-sortune in the world . . . oo
; 114th translated - - - - - 461
mist against hypocris - - - 399
Of |. yo y - - - - 441
Punch, out in the moral part - 14

Punchinello frequented more than the church 14

oo:: of the French king's death - - 403
Giles's - - - - - - 403 | Punishments in schools disapproved - - 157
9: Jenny Mans - - - - - - 493. Punning recommended to: practice of all
Of Will's . . . . . . 403 ages - - - - - - - 61
Sof the temple - - - - - - 493. In what age the pun chiefly flourished - 61
Of Fish-street - - - - - 403 || A famous university much infested with it 61
Of Cheapside - - - - - - 403 | Why banished at present out of the learned
Of Garrawaw's - - - - - 403 world - - - - - - - - 61
Poll, a way o ...; - , , - - , - - 239 || The definition of a pun - - - - 61
Polycarpus, a man beloved by everybody - 280 | Whose privilege - - - - - 396
Pontignan, (Mons.) his adventure with two wo- A pun of thought - - - - - 454
naen - - - - - - - 90|.. By whom punning is affected - - - 504
Poor, the scandalous ol. of them - 430 | Punsters, their talents - - - - - 504
Pope, (Mr.) his miscellany commended by the Puss, speculations on an old and a young one 626
Spectator - - - - - - 523 | Puzzle, (Tom) an eminent i...ofdispu-
Popular applause, the vanity of it - - 188 tant - - - - - - - - 475
Posterity, its privilege - - - - , - 101 || Pyramids of Egypt - - - - - 415
Poverty, the inconveniences and mortifications Pythagoras, his epts about the choice of a
usually attending it - - - - 150 course of life - " - - - - - 447
The loss of merit -., - . . . . . . 464 || His advice to his scholars about examining at
row; : to act Alexander the Great on night what they had done in the day - 586
a droin - - - - -
His artifice on. a clap - - - - 40 | QUACK bill - - - - - - - 444
Powell, (junior) his great skill in motions - 14 Doctors, the cheats of them - - - 444
His performance referred to the opera of Ri- An essay against quacks by Dr. Z. P - 572
naldo and Armida - - - - Quakers, project of an act to marry them to the
Power, despotic, an unanswerable argument olive o - - - - - - 395
against it - - - - - - Qualities, what are truly valuable - - 340
Practice and example, their prevalency on youth 337 | Quality no exemption from reproof - - 34
Praise, the love of it implanted in us - 38, 467 || | Is either of fortune, body, or mind - - 219
A generous mind the most sensible of it - 238 Queries in love answered - - - - 635

Why not freely conferred on men till dead 349
When changed into fame - -, --, - 551
Prayers, Phoenix's allegorical description of them
to Achilles in Homer - - - -
The folly and extravagance of our prayers in
general, make set forms necessary - -
Precipice,distant, why its prospect pleases -
Prediction, the many arts of it in use among the
vulgar - - - - - - - -
Prejudice, the prevalency of it - - - -
A .." about it, as it respects parties in Eng-
an - - - - - - -
Prerogative, when and how asserted with ho-
hour - - - - - -
Pride, a great enemy to a fine face - -
A man crazed with it, a mortifying sight

[ocr errors]

101

Question, a curious one started by a schoolman
about the choice of present and future hap-
o and misery - - - 575
Quidnunc, (Thos.) his letters to the Spectator
about news - - - - - 6:5
Quir, (Peter de) his letter to the Spectator about

puns - - - , , - - - - -
Quixotte, (Don) patron of the Sighers' Club

§o. his #: - - - -
ck, a knotty syllogism - - - -
Raillery in conversation, the absurdity of it
Rainbow, the figure of one contributes to its
magnifice:nce as much as the colours to its
- - - - 415

33
201

beauty - -
Rake, a character of one - - - 5.5

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]

tor - - -
The excellence of his pictures - -
Rattling Club, got into the church - -
Read, '. Wis. his operations on the eyes 472
Readers divided by the Spectator into the mer-

curial and saturnine - - - - 179
Reason, instead of governing passion is often
subservient to it - - - - - 6
Not to be found in brutes - - - - 120
The pilot of the passions - - -
A pretty nice proportion between that and
passion - - - - - - 408
Rebus, a kind of false wit among the ancients 59
And our own countrymen - - - - 59
A rebus at Blenheim-house condemned - 59
Recitative, so not agreeable to an Eng-
no audience - lano - h be 29
itative music in eve age ought to
adapted to the o of the uage - 29
Recreation, the necessity of it. . . . . . . . , 258
Religion, the greatest incentive to good and
worthy actions - - - - - 316
Considered - - - - - - 459
A morose melancholy behaviour, which is ob-
served in several precise professors of reli-
gion, reproved by the Spectator - - , 494

The true spirit of composes and cheers the 494

soul - - - - - - -
Renatus Valentinus, his father and grandfather,

their sto - - - - - -
Rentfree, on, her letter about the green

sickness - - - - - -
Repository for sashions, a building proposed and

descri - - 487

[blocks in formation]

Revenge of a Spanish ladyon a man who boasted
of her favours - - - - -
Rhubarb, (John, Esq.) his memorial from the
country infirmary - - - - 4
Rich, (Mr.) would not suffer the opera of Whit-
tington's cat to be performed in his house,
the reason for it - - - -
Rich: to be rich, the way to please - -
The advantages of riches - - - -
The art of growing rich - - - -
The proper use of riches -, - - -
The defects of rich men overlooked -
Richlieu, (Cardinal) his politics made France
the terror of Europe - - - -
Riches corrupt men's morals - - - 464
Ridicule, the talent of ungenerous tempers 245
Ridicule, the two great branches of, in writing 249
Put to a good use - - - - - 445
Riding, a healthy exercise - - - - 115
Riding-dress of ladies, the extravagance of it 435
Rival mother, the first part of her history - 91
Robin, the porter at Will's coffee-house, his
qualification - - - - - -

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

4 Scotch, a saying of theirs -

No
Roman and Sabine ladies, their example recom-
mended to the British - - - -
Romans, an instance of the general good under-
standing of the ancient Romans - - 502
Rosalinda, a famous whig partisan, her misfor-
tune - - - - - -
Rosicrucius, the story of his sepulchre - 379
A pretended discovery made by a Rosicrucian 574
Rowley, (Mr.) his proposals for a new pair of
lobes - - - - - 552
69
620
400
449

o - -
Roy: Exchange, the great resort to it -
‘Royal Progress,' a poem - - - -
Rusticity shocking - - - - -
Rusty, (Scabbard) his letter to the Spectator
Rynsault, the unjust governor, in what manner
so. by Charles, Duke of Burgundy,
is sovereign - - - - - -

SAINT Paul's eloquence - - -
Salamanders, an order of ladies described -
Sallust, his excellence - - - -
Salmon, (Mrs.) her ingenuity - - -
Salutation subject to great enormities - -
Salutations in churches censured - -
Sanctorius, his invention - - - -
Santer, (Mrs.) a great snuff-taker - -
Sappho, an excellent poetess - - -
ies for love of Phaon - - - -
Her hymn to Venus - - - - - - - -
A . of Sappho's translated into three
different languages - - - - -
Satire, ‘Whole Duty of Man," turned into one
Satires, English ribaldry and Billingsgate -
Panegyrical on ourselves - - - 473
Satirists best instructus in the manners of their
respective times - - - - -
Scandal, to whom most o - - -
How monstrous it renders us - - -
Scales, (golden) a dream of them - - -
Scaramouch an expedient of his at Paris -
Scarfs, the vanity of some clergymen's wear-
ing them - - - - - - -
Scholar's egg, what so called - - - 58
Schoolmasters, the ignorance and want of di
cernment in the generality of them 157,168,313
Schoolmen their ass case - - - - 191
How applied - - - - - - - 191
Scipio, his judgment of Marius when a boy 157
'Scornful lady," Spectator's observations at that
- - 270
- 447

. 633
198
- 400

play - - - - -
Scot, (Dr.) his christian life, its merits -

- - - 463
Scribblers against Spectator, why neglected by
him - - - - - - - 445
The most offensive 582
Seasons, a dream of them - - - - 425
Self conceit, an inhabitant of the paradise of 60
- 4

fools -

rent fundation of civil virtue 248
Self love transplanted, what - - - 129

The narrowness and danger of self love 588
Semanthe, her character - - - - 404
Semiramis, her prodigious works and powers , 415
Sempronia, a professed admirer of the French
nation - - - - - - - 45
The match maker - - - - - 437
Seneca, his saying of drunkenness - - 569
Sense: some men of, more despicable than beg-
rs - - - - - - -
Toirrent degrees of sense in the several
different species of animals : - - 519
Sentry, (Captain) a member of the Spectator's
3. his character - - - - 2
His account of a soldier's life - - - 152
h discourse with a young wrangler in the
aw - - - - -

He receives a letter from Ipswich, giving an
account of an engagement between a

[ocr errors]

No.
French privateer and a little vessel belong-
ing to that place - - - - -
His reflections on that action - 350

Takes possession of his uncle Sir Roger de
Coverley's estate - - - - 517
September (month) described - - - 425
Servants, the general corruption of their man-
ners - - - - - - -
Assume their master's title - - - 88
Some good among the bad ones , -, - 96
Influenced by the example of their ":

riors - - -
The great merit of some servants in all ages 107
The condition of many servants - . 137
Sexes: amity between agreeable persons of dif.
ferent sexes dangerous - - -
Sexes: the advantages of amity to each - 433
Sextus Quintus, the pope, an instance of his un-

[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small]

00 | Solitude: an exemption from passions the only

pleasing solitude - - - -
Few persons capable of a religious, learned,

forgiving temper - - - - - - - or philosophical solitude - -
Shadows realities not mixed in the same ‘Solomon's Song, paraphrase on the second
piece - - - - - - - - 5 chapter - - - - - - 388
Shakspeare, wherein inimitable - - - - 141 §: with notes - - - - - - 470
Excels all writers in his ghosts - - - 419 | Sophocles, his conduct in his tragedy of ‘Elec-
His excellence - - - 562 tra’ - - - - - -

Shalum, the Chinese, his letter to the Princess
Hilpa before the flood - - -
Sherlock, (Dr.) the reason his discourse of death
been so much perused - -
Improved the notion of heaven and hell 447
Shoeing horns, who, and by whom employed , 536
Shovel, (Sir Cloudesley) the ill contrivance of
his monument in Westminster Abbey - 26
Shows and diversions lie properly within the
province of the Spectator - - -
Sickness, a thought on it - - - - 513
Sidney, (Sir Philip) his opinion of the song of
• Chevy Chase' - - - - - 7
Verses on his modesty - - - - 400
Sighers, a club of them at Oxford - - - 30

Sighers, their regulations - - - - 30

Sight, the most perfect sense - - - 41
Pleasures of imagination arise originally

from it - - - - - - 411

Furnishes it with ideas - - - - 411
Sight, second, in Scotland - - - • 604
Sign posts, the absurdity of many of them - 28
Silk-worm, a character of one - - - 454
Similitudes, eminent writers faulty in them 421
The *...* of several poems - - 421
An ill one in a pulpit - - - - 455
Simonides, his satire on women - - ... 209
Sincerity, the great want of it in conversation 103
The advantage osit over dissimulation and de-
ceit - - - - - - - 352
The most compendious wisdom - - - 352
Singularity, when a virtue - - - - 76
An instance of it in a north country gentleman 576
Sippit, (Jack) his character - - - 4.48
Slavery, what kind of government the most re-
moved from it - - - - -
Sloven, a character affected by some, and for
what reason - - - - - 150
The folly and antiquity of it - - - 150
Sly, the haberdasher, advertisement to young
gentlemen in the last year of their appren-

ticeship - - - - - 187
Sly, (John) the tobacconist, his representation
to the Spectator - - - - - 532
His minute - - - - - - 5.
smool bargain in marriage, the inhumanity
of it - - - - - - -
Snape, (Dr.) a quotation from his charity sermon 294
Snarlers - - - - - - - 38
Snuff-box, the exercise of it, where taught - . 138
Socrates, his temper and prudence - - 28
His behaviour at his execution - - - 133
I is specch to his judges - - - 146

His notion of pleasure and pain - - 183

[ocr errors]

Sorites, what sort of figure - - - -
Sorrow the outward signs of it very fallacious 95
Soul, the immortality of it evidenced from seve-

ral proofs - - - - - - 111
Its happiness the contemplation of God - 413
State of it after separation - - - - - 413
Excellency of it considered in relation to
dreams - - - - - - - 487
Sounds, how improper for descri 16

escription - 4
“Speccia della Bestia triomphante,' a book sold

at an auction for thirty pounds - - 38%

Some account of that book - - - 38.9

[ocr errors]

of considering it - , , - , -, - - 554
Sparkish, (Will) a modish husban - - 479
Sparrows bought for the use of the Opera - 9
Spartan virtue acknowledged by the Athenians 6

Spartan justice, an instance of it - -
Spartans, the method used by them in the edu-
cation of their children - - -

Spectator, (The) his prefatory discourse - -
His great taciturnity - - -
His vision of public credit - - - -
His entertainment at the table of an acquaint-
tance - - - - - - -
His recommendation of his speculations - 10

[ocr errors]

Advertised in the Daily Courant - - 12
His encounter with a lion behind the scenes 13
The design of his writings - - - 15
No party man - - - , . . . .- - 15
A little unhappy in the mould of his face 17
His artifice - - - - - - 19
His desire to correct impudence - - 20
And resolution to march on in the cause

[blocks in formation]

the sudd d No. Spring, the pl fth §
His soliloquy upon the sudden and unexpect- pring, the pleasantest season of the year -
ed . # ''. - - - pe - 133 | "A #. of it - - - y - - 423
His artifice to engage his different readers 179 || His attendants - - - - - 423
The character given of him in his own §§§. a kind of Mahometan paradise 383
sence, at a coffee-house near Aldgate - 218 Spy, the mischief of one in a family - - 202
His aversion to pretty fellows, and the reason Squeezing the hand, by whom in used in
of it - - - - - - - 261 making love - - - - -
His acknowledgments to the public - - 262 | Squires, (rural) their want of learning - - 529
His advice to the British ladies - - 265 §. how fatal to weekly historians - 445
His adventure with a woman of the town 266 | Starch, political, its use - - - - - 305

His description of a French puppet newly ar-
rived - - - - - - -

Starers reproved - - - - - 20
Stars, (fixed) how their immensity and magnifi-
- - - 420

His opinion of our form of government and re- cence confound us -
ligion - - - - - - - - 287| A contemplation of the stars - - - 565
Sometimes taken for a parish sexton, and why 289 || State, (future) the refreshments a virtuous per-
His reflections upon Clarinda's journal . . . . 323 son enjoys in prospect and contemplation
Accompanies Sir Roger to Westminster Abbey 329 of it - - - - - - -
His sacrifices to humanity - - - 355 | Statira, in what proposed as a pattern to the fair
His behaviour under reproach, and reasons sex - - - - - - -
for not returning an answer to those who Statuary the most natural representation - 416
have animadverted on his paper - 355 | Stint (Jack) and will Trap, their adventure 448
His contemplations on Good Friday - - 356 Stoics discarded all passions - - - 397
The benefits accruing to the public from his Stores of Providence, what - - - - 248
speculations - T - - T - - - 367 || Story tellers, their ridiculous punctuality - 138
His papers much sought for about Christmas, Strife, the spirit of it - - - - - - 197
by all his neighbours - - - - 367 | Stripes, the use of them on perverse wives 479
His comparison of the world to a stage : 370|Stroke, to strike a bold one, what meant by it ;

He accompanies Sir Roger to Spring garden 383
His zeal for the Hanover succession - 384
ii.invitation to all sorts of people to assist 442

m - -
About the stamps - - - - - 445
Guardian of the fair sex - - - - 449
His advertisements - - - - - 461
About the price of his paper - - - 461
Put into the golden scales - - - - 463
A sort of news letter - - - - 468

IIis account of a coffee-house debate, relating
to the difference between Count Rechteran
and Monsieur Mesnager - - -
The different sense of his readers upon the
rise of his paper, and the Spectator's propo-
sal upon it - - - - - - - - 4
His observations on our modern poems
His edict - - - - -
The effects of his discourses on marriage
His deputation to J. Sly, haberdasher of hats

Sublime in writing what it is - , , -, -
Sudden, (Thomas esq.) his memorial from the
country infirmary - - - -
Sukey's adventure with Will Honeycomb and
Sir Roger de Coverley - - - - - 410
Sun, the first eye of consequence - , -, - 250
Sun-rising and setting most glorious show in na-
ture - - - - - - - 412
so reduced to the notion of quality 219
o be founded only on merit and virtue - 202
Superstition, the folly of it described - -
n error arising from a mistaken devotion 201

Has something in it destructive of religion 213
Surprise, the life of stories - - - 538
“Susanna, or Innocence Betrayed,’ to be ex-
hibited by Powell, with a new pair of El-
ders - - - - - - - - 14
Sweaters, a species of the Mohock club • 332

88
- 523
- 523
523

and tobacconist - - - - - 526
The different judgments of his readers con-
cerning his speculations -., - 2 - - 542
His reasons for often casting his thoughts into
a letter - - - - - - - 542
His project for forming a new club - 550
Visits Mr. Motteux's warehouses - - 552
The great concern the city is in upon his d
sign of laying down his paper - - 553
He takes leave of the town - - - 555
Breaks a fifty years' silence - - - 556
How he recovered his speech - - 556
His politics - - - - - - 556
Loquacity - - - - - - 556
Of no party - - - - - - 556
A calamity of his - - - - - 558
Critics upon him - - - - - 568
He sleeps as well as wakes for the public 599
His dream of Trophonius' cave - - - 599
Why the eighth volume published . 632
Speech, the several organs of it ... - - - 231
Spenser, his advice to young ladies under th
distress of defamation - - - -
His whole creation of shadowy persons - 419
Spies, not to be trusted . - - - - 439
Despised by great men - - - - 489
Spirit, a high one, a great enemy to candour 382
Spirits, the appearance of them not fabulous 110

Several species in the world besides ourselves 419

Spleen, a common excuse for dulness - - 5:
Its effects - - - - - - - 558
Vol. II. 58

Swingers, a set of familiar romps at Tunbridge 492
Symmetry of objects, how it strikes - - 411
Syncopists modern ones - - - - - 567
Syncroplus, the passionate, his character - 438
"Syracusan prince, jealous of his wife, how he
served her - - - - - -

TALE-BEARERS censured - - -
Talents to be valued according as they are ap.
- - - - - 17
what attribut-
- - 140,208
Taste of writing, what it is, and how acquired 409
The perfection of a man's taste as a sense 409
Defined - - 409
That of the English - - - - 409
Tears not always the sign of true sorrow - 95
Temper, serious, the advantage of it - -
Temperance, the best preservative of health
What kind of temperance the best - -
Templar, one of the Spectator's club, his cha-
racter - - - - - - - 2
Temple, (Sir William) his rule for drinking - 195
Ten, called by Platonic writers the complete
number - - - - - - - 221

579
439

plied - - - -
Townpo of the age to
e - -

398
195
195

Tender hearts, an entertainment for them - 627
Tenure, the most slippery in England - 623
Terence, Spectator's observations on one of his
plays - - - - - - - - 502
Terror and pity, why those passions please - 418
Thales, his saying of truth and falsehood - 594

Thames, its banks, and the boats on it described 454
80

That, his remonstrance - - - -

[ocr errors][merged small]

No.

Theatre, (English) the practice of it in several
instances censured - - - 42, 44, 51
Of making love in a Theatre - - - 602

Themistocles, his answer to a question relating
to the martving his daughter - - 3
us and Constantia, their adventures 164
Theognis, a beautiful saying of his - - 464
Thumbleton. (Ralph, his leiter to the Spectator 43?
Thinking aloud, what - - - - 2
Thoughts of the highest importance to sift them 399
Thrash (Will, and his wife, an insipid couple 52
Thunder, of great use on the stage - - -
Thunderer to the playhouse, the hardships put
upon him, and his desire to be unde a
cannan - - - - - - -
Tickell, (Mr.) his verses to the Spectator - 532
Tillotson, (Archbishop) improved the notion of
heaven and hell - - - - - 447
Time, our ill use of it - - - - - 93
The Spectator's direction how to spend it 93
} How the time we live ought to be computed 316

Title-page, (Anthony) his peution to the Specia-

[blocks in formation]

night - - - - - - - 49
Tombs in Westminster Abbey visited by Spec-
talur - - - - - - - 25
His reflections upon them - - - - - 26
Toper, (Jack) his recominendatory letter in be-
half of a servant - - - - - 493
Torre, in Devonshire, how unchaste widows
are punished there - - - - - - 614
Torture, why the description of it pleases, and
not the prospect - - - - - 418
Townly, (Frank) his letters to the Spectator 560
Trade, the benefit of it to Great Britain - 69

Trading and landed interest ever jarring 174
The most likely means to make a man's pri-
vate fortune - - - - -
Tradition of the Jews concerning Moses - 237
Tragedy: a perfect tragedy the noblest produc-
tion of human nature - - - -
Wherein the modern tragedy exceeds that of
Greece and Rome - - - - -
Blank verse the most proper for English Tra-
ged - - - - - - -
The Folo tragedy considered - - -
Tragi-comedy, the product of the English thea-
tre, a monstrous invention - - -
igration, what - - - - 211
The transmigration of souls asserted by Will
Honeycomb - - - - - - 343
How believed by the ancients • - 408
Trap, (Mr.) his letter to Mr. Stint - - - 449
Travel, highly necessary to a coquette - 45
The behaviour of a travelled lady in the
playhouse - - - - - -
At what time travelling is to be undertaken.
and the true ends of it - - -
Travellers, the generality of them exploded 47
Trees, more beautiful in all their luxuriancy
than when cut and trimmed - - 414
Trimming, the Spectator unjustly accused of it 445
Trueby, (Widow) her water recommended by
Sir Roger, as good against the stone and
gravel - - - - - - - -
Truepenny, (Jack) strangely good-natured -
to: a greatman i. the upper gallery
in the playhouse - - - - - 235
an enemy to false wit - - - 63

[ocr errors]

3.29
82

The everlasting good effect truth has even
upon a man's fortune and interest - -

Always consistent with itself - -
The excellence of it - - - - -
Tryphidorus, the great li ist of ano-
quity - - - - - - -
Tully praises himself - - - -
What he said of the immortality of the scu:
Of uttering a jest - - - - -
Of the force of novelty - - - -
What he required in his orator - -
Turner, (Sir William) his excellent marim -
Tyrants, why so called - - - -
VAINLOVES, the family of - - -
Valentinus (Basilius) and Alexandrinus, their
story - - - - - - -
Valerio, his character - - - - -
Valetudinarians in chastity - - - -
Valetudinarians in society, who - - -

Not to be admitted into company but on con-
ditions - - - -
Vanity the paradise of fools - - -
A vision of her and her attendants - -
Vapours in women, to what to be ascribed
Variety of men's actions proceeds from the pes-

[blocks in formation]

On Phebe and Colin - - - - -
Verses, translation of pedantic, out of Italian
The Royal Progress - - - - -

To Mrs. —, on her grotto - - -
Vertumnus, an attendant on the spring - -
Ugliness, some speculations upon it - -
Vice, as laborious as virtue - - - -
Villacerse, (Madame de) an account of her
death, and manner of it - -

283 Vinci, (Leonardo) his many accomplishments.

and remarkable circumstance at his death
Viner, (Sir R.) his familiarity with king
Charles II. - - - - - -
Virgil, his beautiful allegories founded on the
Platonic philosophy - - - -
Wherein short of Homer - - -
His fable examined in relation to Halirartis-
sus's history of Æneas - - -
§: genius oth H - - - - -
ompared wi onner - - - -
When he is best pleased - - -
Virtue, the exercise of it recommended - -
Its influence - - - - - -
Its near relation to decency - - -
The most reasonable and genuine source of
honour - - - - - - -
Of a beautiful nature - - - -
The great ornaments of it - - - -
To be esteemed in a foe - - - -

When sincerity may reasonably be suspected
The way to preserve it in its integrity -
The use of it in our afflictions - - -
Virtues, supposed ones not to be relied on -
Vision of human misery - - - -
isit: a visit to a travelled lady, which she re-
ceived in her bed, described - - -
Vocifer, the qualifications that make him
for a fine gentleman - - -
Volumes: the advantage an author receives of
publishing his works in volumes rather
than in single pieces - - -

[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]
« ZurückWeiter »