The Federalist Papers

Cover
Cosimo, Inc., 01.12.2006 - 656 Seiten
The Federalist papers -- 85 essays written by Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison in support of the adoption of the U.S. Constitution -- began appearing in New York newspapers beginning in the autumn of 1787. And though controversy still swirls around authorship of certain individual essays, and the impact the papers had on the public opinion of the time remains open to debate, it's clear that the dramatic impact on global civilization of these spirited defenses of the nation's founding document cannot be exaggerated. As masterful examinations of the fundamental principals of the U.S. system of government, they are unrivaled -- as works of political philosophy, they have moved and influenced peoples and nations around the world in their battles toward freedom and democracy.This edition also includes The Articles of Confederation of the United States, and The Declaration of Independence.ALEXANDER HAMILTON (1757-1804), JOHN JAY (1745-1829), and JAMES MADISON (1751-1836) are among the most revered of America's Founding Fathers, men whose animated advocacy of the new nation continues to reverberate in political thought today.
 

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Inhalt

GENERAL INTRODUCTION
6
CONCERNING THE GENERAL POWER OF TAXA
10
CONCERNING DANGERS FROM FOREIGN FORCE
13
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
22
NO 7THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
34
THE UNION AS A SAFEGUARD AGAINST DOMESTIC
47
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
53
THE UTILITY OF THE UNION IN RESPECT
62
THE STRUCTURE OF THE GOVERNMENT MUST
317
OVER EACH OTHER
321
NO 52THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
341
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
347
THE APPORTIONMENT OF MEMBERS AMONG
353
THE TOTAL NUMBER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRE
359
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
365
OBJECTION THAT THE NUMBER OF MEMBERS
377

THE UTILITY OF THE UNION IN RESPECT
70
NO lg ADVANTAGE OF THE UNION IN RESPECT
76
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED 119
85
THE INSUFFICIENCY OF THE PRESENT CONFED
86
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
95
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
101
MANY CONSIDERED IN CONNECTION WITH REPRESEN
115
OTHER DEFECTS OF THE PRESENT CONFEDERA
125
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
131
OF THE UNION
141
THE POWERS NECESSARY TO THE COMMON
147
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
155
THE IDEA OF RESTRAINING THE LEGISLATIVE
159
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
166
CONCERNING THE MILITIA
175
NO 31THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
188
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
207
MENT
224
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED AND THE
242
THE POWERS OF THE CONVENTION TO FORM
252
GENERAL VIEW OF THE POWERS CONFERRED
259
THE POWERS CONFERRED BY THE CONSTITU
270
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
278
RESTRICTIONS ON THE AUTHORITY OF
289
NO 45THE ALLEGED DANGER FROM THE POWERS
298
THE PARTICULAR STRUCTURE OF THE NEW GOV
312
CONCERNING THE POWER OF CONGRESS
383
THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
389
NO 6l THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
395
THE SENATE CONTINUED
407
THE POWERS OF THE SENATE
416
OBJECTIONS TO THE POWER OF THE SENATE
429
NO 19THE SAME SUBJECT CONTINUED
431
NO 67THE EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT
436
THE REAL CHARACTER OF THE EXECUTIVE
445
THE EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT FURTHER CON
454
1 THE DURATION IN OFFICE OF THE EXECUTIVE
463
of department dependent on Executive and will change
472
THE COMMAND OF THE MILITARY AND NAVAL
481
THE APPOINTING POWER OF THE EXECUTIVE
491
THE APPOINTING POWER CONTINUED AND OTHER
501
THE POWERS OF THE JUDICIARY
515
NO 8l THE JUDICIARY CONTINUED AND THE DISTRI
528
THE JUDICIARY CONTINUED
534
CERTAIN GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS
555
CONCLUDING REMARKS
567
THE CALL FOR THE FEDERAL CONSTITUTIONAL CON
577
RESOLUTION TRANSMITTING THE CONSTITUTION
584
INDEX
605
PERIODICAL APPEALS TO THE PEOPLE CONSID
611
THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
619
Urheberrecht

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Über den Autor (2006)

Alexander Hamilton was born on January 11, 1757 on the West Indian Island of Nevis. His mother died in 1769, around the same time his father went bankrupt. Hamilton joined a counting house in St. Croix where he excelled at accounting. From 1772 until 1774, he attended a grammar school in Elizabethtown, New Jersey, and went on to study at King's College. Hamilton entered the Revolutionary movement in 1774 at a public gathering in New York City with a speech urging the calling of a general meeting of the colonies. That same year, he anonymously wrote two pamphlets entitled, A Full Vindication of the Measures of Congress from the Calumnies of Their Enemies and The Farmer Refuted. When the Revolutionary War began, Hamilton joined the army and became a Captain of artillery, where he served with distinction in the battles of Long Island, White Plains, Trenton and Princeton. He was introduced to George Washington by General Nathaniel Greene with a recommendation for advancement. Washington made Hamilton his aide-de-camp and personal secretary. He resigned in 1781 after a dispute with the General, but remained in the army and commanded a New York regiment of light infantry in the Battle of Yorktown. Hamilton left the army at the end of the war, and began studying law in Albany, New York. He served in the Continental Congress in 1782-83, before returning to practice law, becoming one of the most prominent lawyers in New York City. In 1786, Hamilton participated in the Annapolis Convention and drafted the resolution that led to assembling the Constitutional Convention in 1787. He then helped to secure the ratification of the Constitution of New York with the help of John Jay and James Madison, who together wrote the collection of 85 essays which would become known as The Federalist. Hamilton wrote at least 51 of the essays. In 1789, Washington appointed him the first Secretary of the Treasury, a position at which he excelled at and gained a vast influence in domestic and foreign issues, having convinced Washington to adopt a neutral policy when war broke out in Europe in 1793. In 1794, Hamilton wrote the instructions for a diplomatic mission which would lead to the signing of Jay's Treaty. He returned to his law practice in 1795. President John Adams appointed Hamilton Inspector General of the Army at the urging of Washington. He was very much involved with the politics of the country though, and focused his attentions on the presidential race of 1800. Hamilton did not like Aaron Burr and went out of his way to make sure that he did not attain a nomination. Similarly, when Burr ran for mayor of New York, Hamilton set about to ruin his chances for that position as well. Burr provoked an argument with Hamilton to force him to duel. Hamilton accepted and the two met on July 11, 1804 at Weehawken, New Jersey. Hamilton was shot and mortally wounded and died on July 12, 1804.

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