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" condemn them; but, upon examining the Accu"fation already brought against them, great Difficul"ties occurred. It appeared, that, tho' they had been guilty of numberlefs Extortions in their merciless "Execution of the Penal Laws, in carrying the Laws st even beyond what they would bear, that would not be fufficient to take away their Lives, being in "themselves only Misdemeanours. It was refolved, at laft, to profecute them for Treafon committed "against Henry VIII."

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dicted.

And, to proceed, not long after Empson They are inand Dudley's Commitment, they were feverally indicted both in London and Northampton ; the overt Acts charged against them were, that they had confpir'd against the King and State, and fummoned, during his late Majefty's Illness, some of their Friends to be ready to take Arms at an Hour's Warning, in order, upon his Death, to haften to London; and either destroy or feize the King's Perfon.

On

By GEORGE CAVENDISH, Efq;

CHA P. IV.

The King promoting his Almoner, being made Cardinal, and Lord Chancellor of England.

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Doctor Bambridge, Archbishop of York, died at Rohan in France, being there the King's Ambaffador, unto which See the King prefented the last new Bishop of Lincoln, so that he had three Bishopricks in his hands at one Time, all ' in one Year given him. Then prepared he again for his Tranflation from the See of Lincoln, to that of York, as he did be 'fore to his Installation.

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After which Solemnization done, and being the Archbi 'fhop and Primas Anglia, thought himself fufficient to

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On the 16th of July, Dudley was tried at Guildhall, London, and Empfon at Northampton, on the 14th of October then following, who were feverally found guilty of High Treafon; and the People in general not only rejoiced on their Conviction, but were fo incenfed against them, that, when they were brought out of the Tower, they were followed by the Populace with loud Acclamations of, Hang up the Commiffioners of Forfeitures! Hell-bounds! Blood Suckers, &c. Bishop Burnet, in his Hiftory of the Reformation, tells us, "That Empfon and Dudley, apprehending the Danger they were like to be in upon their "Master's Death, had been practifing with their Partners, to gather about them all the Power they could bring together; whether to fecure themfelves "from popular Rage, or to make themselves "feem confiderable or formidable to the new King; "this

And convicted of High Trea

fon.

Burnet's Obfer

vations on their

Cafe.

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compare with that of Canterbury, and did thereupon ad< vance his Croffes in the Courts, ⚫ and every other Place, as well in the Precinct and Jurifdiction of Canterbury, as any other Place: And forafmuch as Canterbury claimcth a Superiority over York, as well as over any other Bishoprick within England, and for that caufe

reafon whereof there ingendered 'fome Grudge between them : But fhortly after he obtained to be made Cardinal, and Legatus de Latere, unto whom the Pope fent the Cardinal's Cap, and certain Bulls for his Authority in that Behalf, whereupon he was Inftalled at Westminster in great Triumph 'which was executed by all Bi

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⚫ claimeth an Acknowledgment,fhops with their Mitres, Caps,

· as in antient Obedience of Yark, to abate Advancement

• of his Croffes, to the Croffes of Canterbury.

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The SECRET HISTORY of the CARDINAL,

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Notwithstanding York not < defifting to bear the fame, although Canterbury gave York · a Check for the fame, and told him, it was Prefumption, by

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and other Ornaments: And after all this, he was made Chancellor of England, and Canterbury who was the Chancellor, was difmiffed.

Now he being in the Chancellorship, and endowed with the promotions of Archbishop, and Cardinal de Latere, thought

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"this and other Crimes being brought against them, they were found guilty of Treafon in a legal Way."

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A Remark

The Propriety of this we fhall not examine into, but only remark on what the learned thereon. Bishop phrafes found guilty in a legal Way; for, tho' Hiftorians allow, that they met with their deserved Fate, most believed them not guilty of the Crimes they were convicted of; not being able to conceive, that two Perfons, who had made themselves fo hateful to the Nation, could hope for any Support in an Attempt to levy War and fieze the King's Perfon.

Notwithstanding the different Juries, that tried thefe avaricious Commiffioners, found them guilty of Crimes worthy of Death, his Majefty did not think proper to order them immediately for Execution, but directed them to be detained in Cuftody, till their Cases should be laid before the Parliament, which did not meet this Year.

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By GEORGE CAVENDISH, Efq;

himself fo fully furnished, that Dominion, and all other Perhe was now able to fur- fons to the Glory of his Digmount Canterbury in all Junity. Then had he two great rifdictions; and in all Eccle- • Croffes of Silver, whereof one 'fiaftical Powers to Convocate was of his Archbishoprick, Canterbury, and all other Bi- and the other of his Legafie, fhops, and Spiritual Perfons borne before him wherefoever 'to affemble at his Convoca- he rode or went, by two of 'tions, where he would affign, the tallest Priefts that he could ' and take upon him the Con' verfion of all Minifters, and "others within their Jurifdictions,

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and vifited all the Spiritual
Houfes, in their Diocefe, and
'all manner of Spiritual Mi-
• nisters,
as Commiffioners,
Scribes, Apparators, and all

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' other neceffary Officers to fur

'nith his Courts, and did con

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vent by Convention, whom he
pleafed through this Realm and

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in this Realm.

And to the Increase of his Gain, he had in his Hand the Bishoprick of Durham, and St. • Albans in Commendum: Alfo, when Doctor Fox, Bishop of Winchefter died, he did furrender Durham to the King, and took himself to Winchester. He had alfo, as it were in Farm, the Bishoprick of Bath, Worcester, and Hereford, for

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The Wits in thofe Days employed themselves in making Satyrical Pieces on Empfon and Dudley, particularly, Mr. Cornish, of the King's Chapel, made feveral fevere Verfes on Sir Richard Empfon, at the Request of the Earl of Kent, in Return for fome hard Ufage the Earl had met with from Empfon in the Time of his Ministry.

Stow relates, that Dudley, during his Confinement, wrote a Book, intituled The Tree of Common-Wealth, which he dedicated to the King, a Copy whereof he gave to his Grandfon, the Earl of Leicester, about the Year 1562.

Dudley, at the Time of his Fall, had no lefs in Offices than to the yearly Value of 800 l. befides 20,000 l. in ready Money, over and above Jewels, Plate, and rich Houfhold Goods, to a very great Amount; and all this he gathered in lefs than 13 Years Time.

Empfon

Dudley's large
Fortune.

The SECRET HISTORY

the Incumbents of them were • Strangers. He had alfo attending upon him Men of

of the CARDINAL,

great Poffeffions, and the talleft Yeomen for his Guard in 'the Realm.

Then had he in the HallKitchen two Clarks, a Clark

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СНАР. V.

Of the Orders and Officers of his House and Chapple.

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OW firft for his Houfe

N you fhall understand,

that he had in his Hall three • Boards kept with three feveral Officers (that is to fay) a Steward, that was always a Prieft; a Treasurer, that was ever a Knight; and a Comptroller that was an Esquire: Also a • Confeffor, a Doctor; three Marfhals, three Ufhers in the Hall, befides two Almoners and Grooms.

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bourers, and Children, twelve Perfons; four Men of the Scullery, two Yeoman of the Pastry, with two other Pastlayers under the Yeomen.

Then had he in his Kitchin, a Mafter Cook, who went daily in Velvet or Sattin, with a gold Chain, befides two other

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Cooks,

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Comptroller, and a Surveyor over the Dreffer; a Clark in the Spicery, which kept continually a Mefs together in the Hall; alfo he had in the HallKitchen two Cooks, and La

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The King prefents &c. to his Alma

House,

ner.

Empfon likewife acquired a very great Fortune, and lived in great Splendor to the Time of his Fall, at his House in Fleet-ftreet, near the King's Palace of Bridewell, which the King, upon his Conviction, was pleased to give to his Almoner, Wolfey. This Prefent must have been very confiderable, because, as is mentioned in the Grant, it had ten Gardens belonging to it. Hiftorians fay, the King made Wolfey this Prefent, in order to have him near the Court.

The next Matter of Confequence was, the King's marrying Catherine of Arragon, Prince Arthur's Widow. We have before obferved what at firft prevailed on Hen. the VIIth to contract his Son Henry to this Prin cefs. Those who favoured the Lady took the Liberty to urge, 1. That, if the King perfifted in not marrying her, it might make Spain too formidable, and too much expose his People to be ill used, either by the

Cooks, and fix Labourers in the fame Room.

In the Larder, one Yeoman and a Groom; in the Scullery, one Yeoman and two Grooms; in the Buttery two Yeomen ' and two Grooms; in the Ewry 'fo many; in the Cellar, three 'Yeoman, three Pages; in the Chandlery, two Yeoman; in the Wayfary, two Yeoman; in the Wardrobe of Beds, 'the Master of the Wardrobe, ' and twenty Perfons befides; in 'the Laundery, a Yeoman and 'a Groom, and thirteen Pages,

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two Yeoman Purveyors, and a 'Groom-Purveyor; in the Bake• house, two Yeoman and Grooms; in the Wood-yard one Yeoman and a Groom;

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By GEORGE CAVENDISH, Efq;

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Arguments for and against the King's Marriage.

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in the Barn, one Yeoman; Porters at the Gate, two Yeomen, and two Grooms; a Yeoman in his Barge, and a Master of his Horfe; a Clark of the Stables, and a Yeoman of the fame; a Farrier, and a Yeoman of the Stirrop; a Maltlour and fixteen Grooms, every one of them keeping four Geldings.

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Now will I declare unto you the Officers of his Chapple, and finging Men of the fame. First, he had there a Dean, a great Divine, and a 'Man of excellent Learning, ⚫ and a Sub-Dean, a Repeator of the Quire, a Gofpeller, an Epiftoler of the finging Priefts, a Mafter of the Children; in

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