Stratagems of Chess: Or, A Collection of Critical and Remarkable Situations, Selected from the Works of Eminent Masters, Illustrated on Plates, Describing the Ingenious Moves by which the Game is Either Won, Drawn, Or Stale-mate Obtained. Taken from the Celebrated French Work, Intituled, Stratagèmes Des Échecs. Carefully Revised and Improved. To which is Prefixed, an Introduction to the Game of Chess

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T. and J. Allman, 1817 - 229 Seiten
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Seite 28 - ... would prevent it. 10. Whenever you can make an opening with two or three pawns on the adversary's king, you then are almost sure of the game. 11. If ever the strength of your game consists of pawns, strive to take the adversary's bishops, because they, much more than the castles, could prevent the advancement of your pawns.
Seite 12 - The castles, in the two corners of the board, next to the knights ; and the eight pawns, or common men, upon the eight squares of the second line. (See Frontispiece.) The pieces, and pawns, on the side of each king, take their names from him, as those on the side of the queen do from her, and are called the black or white king's bishop...
Seite 17 - HOYLE'S RULES FOR CHESS. 1. Move your pawns before your pieces, and afterwards bring out the pieces to support them ; therefore the king's, queen's, and bishop's pawns should be the first played, in order to open the game well. 2. Do not, therefore, play out any of your pieces early in the game, because you thereby lose moves, in case your adversary can, by playing a pawn, make them retire, and...
Seite 22 - ... 22. When the adversary has no more than his king and one pawn on the board, and you a king only, you can never lose that game if you bring and keep your king opposite to your adversary's, when he is immediately either before or on one side of his pawn, and only one house between the kings. This must then either be a drawn game, or if the opponent persists in his endeavours to win, he will lose by a stalemate, by drawing you upon the last square.
Seite 22 - ... 24. When you have only your queen left in play, and your king happens to be in the position of stale-mate, keep giving check to your adversary's king, always taking care not to check him where he can interpose any of his pieces that make the stale...
Seite 34 - ... can afterwards recal it. 4. If you misplace your men, and play two moves, it lieth in your adversary's power whether he will permit you to begin the game afresh. 5. When the adversary gives check without warning, you are not obliged to notice it until he does : but if on his next move he warns you, each party must then retract his last move, and the king be removed off check. 6. Should the opponent warn you of a check...
Seite 13 - ... his queen, (viz. the rook is moved into the next square to the king; and the king moves to the square on the other side of him, which is also called castling ;) provided nevertheless no piece is between him and the rook ; nor after this rook hath been played ; nor after the king hath been moved; nor when the king is in check ; nor when the square over which he means to leap is viewed by an adverse man, who would check him in his passage. The...
Seite 20 - When the kings have castled on different sides of the board, attack with the pawns you have on that side where the adversary has castled, advancing the pieces, especially the queen and rooks, to support them ; and if the adversary's king has three pawns on a line in front, he should not stir them till forced to it. 17.
Seite 25 - ... a piece, you either get a pawn or two, or such a situation as ends in his discomfiture. 7. Supposing your queen and another piece are attacked at the same time, and by removing your queen you must lose...
Seite 24 - ... 44 in addition) that make a square, with the help of other pieces, well managed, form an invincible strength, and probably may produce you a queen : on the contrary, two pawns, with an interval between (as on 35 and 37), are no better than one...

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