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A

DICTIONARY

OF THE

ENGLISH LANGUAGE:

IN WHICH

THE WORDS ARE DEDUCED FROM THEIR ORIGINALS,

AND

ILLUSTRATED IN THEIR DIFFERENT SIGNIFICATIONS BY EXAMPLES FROM

THE BEST WRITERS.

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LONDON:
PRINTED FOR LONGMAN, HURST, REES, AND ORME, PATERNOSTER-ROW;
S, LOHNSON W. J. AND J. RICHARDSON; J. WALKER; R. BALDWIN;

P. AND C. RIVINGTON; T. PAYNP.;
B. BANDER, WALOWNDES; H. NANSON ANWARRERASONE SCAYCNÉRE AND LETTERMAN; I. EGERTON
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AND ,

, YORK.

1805.

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А

DICTIONARY

OF THE

ENGLISH LANGUAGE.

tions.

DIABOʻLICAL.
DIABOʻLICK.

DIA

DIA
DIABETES. r. s. (9.2641ns.) A mor-

Brings dangers, troubles, cares, and sleeples bid copiousness of urine; a fatal col

nights,

Milton. liquation by the urinary passages.

To him who wears the regal diadem.
An increase of that secretion may accompany

Why should he ravish then that diadem
the general colliquations ;
as in íuxes, hectic
From your grey temples, which the hand of time

Denbain. sweats and coughs, diabetes, and other consump

Must shortly plant on his?
Derbem's Physico-Theology.

Faction, that once made diadems her prey,

And stopt our prince in his triumphant way, adj. (trom diabolu.

Fled like a mist before this radiant day. Roscom. taking of the qualities of the devil ; imá

Lat.] Devilish; pai- : DIADEMED. adj. (froin diadem.] Adorned picus ; atrocious; nefarious ; pertaining

with a diadem ; crowned.
to the devil,

Not so, wheri diaden'd with rays divine,
This in other beasts observed,

Tach'd with the time that breaks from virtue's

slirinę,
Doubt might beget of diabclick pow'r,

Her yjestless muise forbids the good to die,
Active within, beyond the sense of brute. Mill; And opes tre temple of eternity;

Popes Does not the ambitious, the envious, and the DIABROm. nis. [doceocon éw] The time revengeful man know very well

, that the thirst of blood, and affectation of dominion by vio

in whick any notion is performed ; the lence and oppression, is a most diabolical

outrage

time in which a pendulum performs its Hpon the laws of God and Nature. L' Estrange.

vibration.
The practice of lying is a diabolical exercise,
and they that use it are the devil's children. Ray.

A gry is one tenth of a line, a line one tenth
Damned spirits must needs be all envy, de

of an inch, an inch one tenth of a philosophical spair and rage ; and have so much of a dialolical

foot, a philosophical foot one third of a pendu

lum; whose diadroms, in the latitude of fortynature in them, as to wish all men to share their

five degrees, are each equal to one second of Atterbury. time, or a of a minute.

Locke, ration or disjunction of syllables; as (draxeçmà.] The

aër,
DIAGNOʻstick. n, s. [orcyáoxw.) A

symptom by which a disease is distinan ensign of royalty bound

guished from others.

I shall lay down some indisputable marks of this vice, that whenever we see the tokens, we

may conclude the plague is in the house :-let
Sponser.
us hear your diagnosticks.

Collier on Pride.
One of our physicians proved disappointed of
his prognosticks, or rather diagnosticks. Hervey.
DIA'GONAL. adj. [Sizyósos.] Reach-

ing from one angle to another, so as to
divide a parallelogram into equal parts.

The monstrosity of the badger is ill-contrived,
and with some disadvantage; the shortness being
Sxed unto the legs of one side, that might have

B.

misery.
syrup of poppies.
Diaco'USTICS. 1. s.

doctrine of sounds.
DIADEM. n. s. (diadema, Latin.)
1. A tiara;
about the head of eastern monarchs.

The sacred diader in pieces rent,
And purple robe gored with many a wound.

A list the coblers' temples ties,
To keep the hair out of their eyes;
From whence 'tis plain the diadem,
"That princes wear, derives from them. Swift.
3. The mark of royalty worn on the
head; the crown.

A crown,
Hulden in shew, is bus a wreath of thorns ;
VOL. II.

movers.

Shakspears.

been more properly placed upon the diagonal If the conferring of a kindness did not bind

Brown's Vulgar Errors. the pesson upon whom it was conferred to the All sorts of stone coniposed of granules, will returns of gratitude, why, in the universal diacut and rive in any direction, as well in a per lect of the world, are kindnesses still called oblipendicular, or in a diagonal, as horizontally and gations ?

South. parallel to the side of ine strata. Woodward. DiALE'CTICAL. adj. [from dialectick.) DIAGONAL. 1. s. (trom the adjective. Logical ; argumental.

A line drawn froin angle to angle, and Those dialecticul subtieties, that the schoolmen dividing a square into equal parts. employ about physiological mysteries, more de

When a man has in his mind one idea of tiro clare the wit of him that uses them, than increase lines, viz. the side and airporal of a square,

the knowledge of sober lovers of truth. Boyle, whereof the diagomi is an inch long, he may DIALECTICK. n. s. [ão chextixn.] Lo. have the idea also of the division of that line gick; the art of reasoning: into a certain number of equal parts.,

Locke.

Di'ALLING. 1. s. [from dial.] The sci. DIA GONALLY. adv. (trom diagonal.]

aterick science; the knowledge of shaIn a digonal direction.

dow; the art of constructing dials on The right and left are not defined by philosophers according to common acceptation, that

which the shadow, may show the hour.

Di'ALIST. n. s. is, respectively from one man uinto another, or

[from dial.] A conany constant site in each, as though that should structer of cials. he the right in onc, which, upon contront or Scientitick dialists, by the geometrick consifacing, stands athwart or diagonally unto the derations of lines, have found out rules to mark other; but were distinguished according unto out the irregular motion of the shadow in all their activity, and predominant locomotion, on latitudes, and on all planes.

Moxon. the either side. Brown's Vulgar Erreurs. Dia’logist. n. s. [from dialogue.] A Di'AGRAM. n. S. [dayçaypa.] A delinea speaker in a dialogue or conference; a

tion of geometrical figures; a mathe writer of dialogues. matical scheine.

DI'ALOGUE. n. s. [8ároyos.) A conMany a fair precept in pectry is like a seem

ference; a conversation between two or ing demonstration in the mathematicks; very

more, either real or feigned. specious in the di gram, but failing in the mechanick operation.

Drydin.

Will you hear the dialogue that the two Why do not these persons make a diagram of

learned men have compiled in praise of the owl

ard cuckoo ? these cogitarive lines and angles, and demenstrate their properties of perception and appetite,

Oh, the impudence of this wicked sex! Las

civious dialogues are innocent with you. Dryden. as plainly as we know the other properties of triangles and circles?

Bentley.

In casy dialogues is Fletcher's praise :

He mor'd the mind, but had not pow'r to raise. DIAGRY'DIATES. 2. S. [from diagryılium,

Dryden Latin.] Strong purgatives made with. Di’ALOGUE. v.a. [from the noun.] diagrydium.

To discourse with another; to confer. Al cholerick humours ought to be evacuated. by diagrydiates, mixed with cálcat oor soepe acid, DIALY'sis. n. s. [dichvors:]

Dost dialoguge with thy shadow? Shakspeare. or rhubarb pouvders,

The figure D’’AL. n.'s. [cliale: Skiriner.] : plate

in rhetorick by which syllables or words marked with lines, wine, a fiind or

are divided. shadow shows the hour.: : :

DIAMETER. n. s. [osà and pitcor.] O, gentlemen, the time of life is shirt

The line which, passing through the To spend that shortness bastle iscie too long, centre of a circle, or other curvilinear Though life did ride upon a dil'spomi,

figure, divides it into equal parts. Still ending at th' arrival of an hour. Shakspeare. The space between the earth and the moon,

If the motion be very slow, we perceive it not: according to Proleny, is seventeen times the we have no sense of the accretive notion of plants diameter of the earthi, which makes, in a gross or animals; and the sly shadow steals away upon account, about one hundred and twenty thouthe dial, and the quickest eye can discover no sand miles.

Raleigh. more than that it is gone.

Glanville. The bay of Naples is the most delightful one DIAL-PLATE. n. s. [dial and plate.]. That

that I ever saw : It lies in almost a round figure on which hours or lines are marked. of about thirty miles in the diameter. Addison.

Strada tells us that the two friends, being each Diametral. adj. [froin diameter.] Deof them possessed of a magnetical needle, made scribing the diameter ; relating to the a kind of dial-plate, inscribing it with the four diameter. and twenty letters, in the same manner as the DIAʼMETRALLY. adv. [from diametral.] hours of the day are marked upon the ordinary dial-plate.

Addison's Spectator.

According to the direction of a diame

ter; in direct opposition. DI'ALECT. n. s. [ddaextos.]

Christian piety is, beyond all other things dia. 3. The subdivision of a language; as the metrally opposed to prophaneness and impiety of Attic, Doric, Ionic, Æolic dialects.

actions,

Hammond. 2. Style ; manner of expression,

DIAME'TRICAL. adj. [from diameter.] When themselves do practise that whereof

3. Describing a diameter. they write, they change their dialect; and those words they shun, as if there were in them

sone

2. Observing the direction of a diameter. secret sting.

Hooker.

· The sin of calumny is set in a most diametrical

opposition to the evangelical precept of loving out 3. Language ; speech.

neighbours as ourselves. In her youth

Gov. of the Tonguito There is a prone and speechloss dialect, DIAME'TRICALLY. adv. [from diametrin Such as moves men.

Sbakspeare. cál.] In a diametrical direction.

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