Comly's Reader and Book of Knowledge: With Exercises in Spelling and Defining, Intended for the Use of Schools, and for Private Instruction

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Thomas L. Bonsal, 1849 - 212 Seiten
 

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Seite 152 - They mount up to the heaven, they go down again to the depths: their soul is melted because of trouble." "They reel to and fro, and stagger like a drunken man, and are at their wits
Seite 17 - Blessed is the man that walketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor standeth in the way of sinners, nor sitteth in the seat of the scornful. But his delight is in the law of the Lord, and in his law doth he meditate day and night.
Seite 152 - Such as sit in darkness, and in the shadow of death, being bound in affliction and iron...
Seite 153 - Let them exalt him also in the congregation of the people, and praise him in the assembly of the elders.
Seite 152 - Oh that men would praise the Lord for his goodness, And for his wonderful works to the children of men I For he hath broken the gates of brass, And cut the bars of iron in sunder.
Seite 143 - I then came home and went whistling all over the house, much pleased with my whistle, but disturbing all the family. My brothers, and sisters, and cousins, understanding the bargain...
Seite 20 - And they said one to another, We are verily guilty concerning our brother, in that we saw the anguish of his soul, when he besought us, and we would not hear; therefore is this distress come upon us.
Seite 143 - I, too much for his whistle. If I knew a miser, who gave up every kind of comfortable living, all the pleasure of doing good to others, all the esteem of his fellow-citizens, and the joys of benevolent friendship, for the sake of accumulating wealth, Poor man, said I, you pay too much for your whistle.
Seite 153 - He poureth contempt upon princes, and causeth them to wander in the wilderness, where there is no way.
Seite 143 - I saw any one too ambitious of court favours, sacrificing his time in attendance on levees, his repose, his liberty, his virtue, and perhaps his friends, to attain it, I have said to myself, This man gives too much for his whistle.

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