History of England: From the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace of Aix-la-Chapelle, Band 2

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Baudry's European Library, 1841

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Seite 187 - Prince, his colour went and came, his eyes sparkled, he shifted his place, and grasped his sword. Charles observed his demeanour, and, turning briskly towards him, called out, ' Will not you assist me ?' 'I will, I will,' said Ranald, ' though no other man in the Highlands should draw a sword ; I am ready to die for you.
Seite 31 - This Convention, Sir, I think from my soul, is nothing but a stipulation for national ignominy ; an illusory expedient to baffle the resentment of the nation ; a truce, without a suspension of hostilities, on the part of Spain ; on the part of England, a suspension, as to Georgia, of the first law of nature, self-preservation and self-defence...
Seite 403 - ... answered my own questions in my lord's voice as nearly as I could imitate it. I walked up and down, as if we were conversing together, till I thought they had time enough thoroughly to clear themselves of the guards. I then thought proper to make off also. I opened the door, and stood half in it, that those in the outward chamber might hear what I said ; but held it so close, that they could not look in. I bid my lord a formal farewell for that night...
Seite 211 - Charles put himself at the head of the second line, which was close behind the first, and addressed them in these words: — "Follow me, gentlemen, and by the " blessing of God, I will this day make you a free and happy people!
Seite 139 - Such a shameful degree of profligacy prevailed, that the retailers of this poisonous compound set up painted boards in public, inviting people to be drunk for the small expense of one penny ; assuring them they might be dead drunk for two-pence, and have straw for nothing.
Seite 231 - Cameron having assured her that they would not injure either her, or her little children, or any person whatever, she looked at him for some moments with an air of surprise, and then opened a press, calling out with a loud voice, ' Come out, children, ' the gentleman will not eat you...
Seite 270 - ... unluckily was with him), in the Duke's army, fighting for the liberties of his country at Culloden, where his unhappy father was in arms to destroy them.
Seite 273 - I was an absolute pedant; when I talked my best, I quoted Horace; when I aimed at being facetious, I quoted Martial; and when I had a mind to be a fine gentleman, I talked Ovid.
Seite 234 - ... and every little article of value she possessed ; the price of which, in a purse, she laid at the feet of Prince Charles, while, straining her dim eyes to gaze on his features, and pressing his hand to her shrivelled lips, she exclaimed, with affectionate rapture, in the words of Simeon, "Lord! now lettest " thou thy servant depart in peace ! " It is added that she did not survive the shock when, a few days afterwards, she was told of the retreat.
Seite 220 - British sovereign can grant, we hereby for ourselves, as heir-apparent to the crown, ratify and confirm the same in our own name, before Almighty God, upon the faith of a Christian and the honour of a Prince. " Let me now expostulate this weighty matter with you, my father's subjects...

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