The Poultry Book: A Treatise on Breeding and General Management of Domestic Fowls

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Phillips, Sampson, 1851 - 310 Seiten
 

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Seite 17 - gainst that season comes Wherein our Saviour's birth is celebrated, The bird of dawning singeth all night long...
Seite 145 - ... requiring its services writes a small billet upon thin paper, which is placed lengthwise under the wing, and fastened by a pin to one of the feathers, with some precautions to prevent the pin from pricking, and the paper from filling with air, so as to retard and weary the bird. On being released, the carrier ascends to a great height, takes one or two turns in the air, and then commences its forward career. According to one account, it can fly...
Seite 68 - I have yet seen ; their bodies being very long, full, and well-fleshed in the breast and other valuable parts. They are short-legged, thickly feathered, with fine delicate heads, both double and single combs, and a shining, beautiful plumage. The color of their legs is white, or fleshcolored, having five, instead of four toes, the fifth being apparently superfluous, and rising like a spur from the same root as the heel toe in the common varieties. This is a distinguishing mark of the variety. They...
Seite 209 - ... that it should not be capable of being dissolved by the moisture transpired from the interior, and the varnish fulfilled this condition ; but, unfortunately, though varnish is not very expensive, it is not a common article in country places where eggs are most abundantly produced, while the country people, besides, are not easily brought to make use of anything to which they have not been accustomed. In order to get over this difficulty, M. Reaumur was led to try other substances, and soon found...
Seite 216 - This air-bag is of such great importance to the development of the chick, probably by supplying it with a limited atmosphere of oxygen, that, if the blunt end of an egg be pierced with the point of the smallest needle, (a stratagem which malice not unfrequently suggests,) the egg cannot be hatched, but perishes.
Seite 239 - ... a neat pavilion, with a large arched window. These pavilions are united to the centre of the design by a colonnade of small castiron pillars, painted white, which support a cornice and a slate roof, covering a paved walk, and a variety of conveniences for the poultry, for keeping corn, eggs, &o.
Seite 240 - Highland breed, published in the Transactions of the Highland and Agricultural Society of Scotland...
Seite 57 - Philanthropists are in the habit of declaiming much against the practice of cock-pit battles, but, on reflection, the cruelty of that sport will be found among the least, wherein the feelings of animals are concerned, since fighting, in the game cock, is...
Seite 145 - Though the carrier-pigeon is naturally prompted to revert to the place of its ordinary residence, man has adopted various precautionary measures in order to make its return on particular occasions more certain. A male and female are usually kept together, and treated well ; and one of these, when taken elsewhere, is supposed to have the greater inducement to come back. It is even considered necessary by some, that the bird should have left eggs in the process of incubation, or unfledged young ones...

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