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HE Epidemics of Hippocrates appear to be a kind of jour

| mal, in which, among other matters, that attentive and exact observer kept an account of the medical constitution of the seasons, and of the different cases which fell under his observation; the symptoms and events of which are related with great conciseness; but with very little attention to the medical treatment of the patients. The task of translating this work, we are told, was originally undertaken by the present Translator “for his own emolument;’ and when he had finished it, he “was desirous to communicate it to mankind, to save them the same trouble, and perhaps too great an occupation of their time.” He ‘was at the same time furnished with a number of commentators, and a variety of editions of the Works of Hippocrates; and therefore made the translation rather a study than a mere verbal interpretation: being willing to translate rather as a physician than as a grammarian.’ o Dr. Farr has not however merely confined himself to the task of translating his Author; as he has annexed to his translation a large body of notes and observations. Speaking of preceding translators and commentators, of whose iabours however he acknowledges that he has availed himself, he takes notice of many deficiencies in all the writers that he has consulted,—“Some,’ says he, “have erred in the Latin translations which they have given us, preferring elegance of language to the real interpretation, which sometimes is to be conveyed in a vulgar and barbarous expression. Others have contented themselves with a mere commentary, or enlarging the verbage of their author, rather than illustrating his meaning by apt allusions or judicious illustrations. Others, indeed, as Dr. Freind and Dr. Glass, &c. have gone upon a much better plan, by determining the propriety of the pračtice of Hippocrates, and accommodating it to experience and reason. But still their commentary is too much separated from the Author; and for want of having him always before you, the judgment of the Reader is in some measure deprived of its proper exercise. Upon these accounts, I have thought that a more connected body of notes joined immediately to a faithful translation of this useful work, would answer every purpose which might be required; would convey the sen- - - - - timents

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