A Disquisition on government and a discourse on the Constitution and government of the United States

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Page 355 - That to this compact each state accede,d as a state, and is an integral party, its co-states forming as to itself, the other party : That the Government created by this compact was not made the exclusive or final judge of the extent of the powers delegated to itself...
Page 354 - ... in case of a deliberate, palpable and dangerous exercise of other powers, not granted by the said compact, the States who are parties thereto, have the right, and are in duty bound to interpose, for arresting the progress of the evil, and for maintaining, within their respective limits, the authorities, rights, and liberties appertaining to them.
Page 325 - States, and the decision is against their validity, or where is drawn in question the validity of a statute of, or an authority exercised under any State on the ground of their being repugnant to the Constitution, treaties, or laws of the United States, and the decision is in favor of their validity...
Page 353 - That this assembly doth explicitly and peremptorily declare that it views the powers of the Federal Government as resulting from the compact to which the States are parties...
Page 318 - By the twenty-filth section of the judiciary act of seventeen hundred and eighty-nine, it is provided, "that a final judgment or decree in any suit in the highest court of law or equity of a state, in which a decision in the suit could be had...
Page 208 - No state shall, without the consent of congress, lay any duty on tonnage, keep troops or ships of war in time of peace, enter into any agreement or compact with another state or with a foreign power, or engage in war, unless actually invaded or in such imminent danger as will not admit of delay.
Page 206 - To exercise exclusive legislation in all cases whatsoever, over such district (not exceeding ten miles square) as may, by cession of particular States, and the acceptance of Congress, become the seat of government of the United States, and to exercise like authority over all places purchased, by the consent of the legislature of the State in which the same shall be, for the erection of forts, magazines, arsenals, dockyards, and other needful 'buildings.
Page 350 - ... general welfare, and for which, under that description, an appropriation of money is requisite and proper. And there seems to be no room for a doubt that whatever concerns the general interests of learning, of agriculture, of manufactures, and of commerce, are within the sphere of the national councils, as far as regards an application of money.
Page 249 - ... be cancelled, abridged, restrained, or modified, by the Congress, by the Senate or House of Representatives, acting in" any capacity, by the President, or any department or officer of the United States, except in those instances in which power is given by the Constitution for those purposes; and that, among other essential rights, the liberty of conscience, and of the press, cannot be cancelled, abridged, restrained, or modified, by any authority of the United States.
Page 136 - In all our deliberations on this subject we kept steadily in our view that which appears to us the greatest interest of every true American, the consolidation of our Union, in which is involved our prosperity, felicity, safety, perhaps our national existence.

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